Óscar Freire: Wikis

  
  

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Óscar Freire
Freire in the 2008 Ronde van Vlaanderen
Freire in the 2008 Ronde van Vlaanderen
Personal information
Full name Óscar Freire Gómez
Nickname The Cat, Oscarito
Date of birth February 15, 1976 (1976-02-15) (age 33)
Country  Spain
Height 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in)
Weight 63 kg (140 lb)
Team information
Current team Rabobank
Discipline Road
Role Rider
Rider type Sprinter
Professional team(s)1
1998–1999
2000–2002
2003–
Vitalicio Seguros
Mapei
Rabobank
Major wins
MaillotMundial.PNG Road Race World Championships (1999, 2001, 2004)
Tour de France, 4 stages
Jersey green.svg Points Classification (2008)

Vuelta a España, 7 stages
Tirreno-Adriatico (2005)
Milan-Sanremo (2004, 2007)
Vattenfall Cyclassics(2006)
Brabantse Pijl (2005, 2006, 2007)
Ghent-Wevelgem (2008)

Infobox last updated on:
September 11, 2008

1 Team names given are those prevailing
at time of rider beginning association with that team.

Óscar Freire Gómez (born February 15, 1976 in Torrelavega, Cantabria) is a Spanish professional road bicycle racer, riding for the UCI ProTeam Rabobank. He is one of the top sprinters in road bicycle racing, having won the world championship a three times, equalling Alfredo Binda, Rik Van Steenbergen and Eddy Merckx. He has also twice won Milan-Sanremo.

Contents

Career

Freire became professional in 1998 with Vitalicio Seguros. He won one race that year, a stage of the Vuelta a Castilla y León. He came 11th in Paris-Tours. In 1999, Freire won little until the world championship in October. He went to Verona to make up numbers in the Spanish team. He spent his prize on an elevator for his grandmother's apartment.

Despite diminutive stature, Freire is a feared sprinter. He is sometimes criticized for his training, since he rides only half the distance of other cyclists.

Freire joined Mapei in 2000. It had been ranked best team since 1994. That year he won 11 races including two stages in the Vuelta a España. He also came third place in the world championship. In 2001 he won two races and took the points competition in the Vuelta a Burgos, before becoming world champion for the second time. In 2002 he won a stage in the Tour de France.

In 2003, Freire moved to Rabobank, where in his first season he won six races. In 2004 he won Milan-Sanremo, Trofeo Luis Puig, a stage and second place overall in Tirreno-Adriatico, a stage in the Vuelta a España and for the third time, and the second time in Verona, the world championship. He started 2005 winning three stages, the points classification and the yellow jersey at Tirreno-Adriatico, as well as the Brabantse Pijl, Trofeo Alcudia and Trofeo Mallorca, all before the end of March. His season was then cut short by a saddle sore.

In 2006, Freire won his second consecutive Brabantse Pijl. His stage 3 win at Tirreno-Adriatico allowed him to lead for two days. At the Tour de Suisse, he survived an early break of four riders to win alone on stage 7.

Freire won the fifth and ninth stages in the 2006 Tour de France and was contesting the points classification when he retired due to illness. During stage twelve, he was in a breakaway with three others. When Yaroslav Popovych, riding for the Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team, rode away for victory, rumours spread that Freire had been ordered by Rabobank not to ride for the victory, to secure help from the Discovery Team in the mountains. Although rumours were denied by both teams, Freire was upset after the stage.

Freire continued his successful year by winning the Vattenfall Cyclassics ahead of German favourite Erik Zabel. Freire had half of Rabobank’s victories in 2006. His season was cut short by neck and spinal injuries, forcing him to miss the Vuelta a España and world championship.

Freire re-signed for Rabobank in late 2006 until the end of 2008, rejecting Saunier Duval-Prodir.

In the 2007 Tour de France, he did not win a stage, partly because Rabobank was defending Michael Rasmussen's lead for a large part of the race. But he won three stages in the Vuelta a España.

In the Tour, Freire wore the green jersey from stage 8. He won stage 14 and the points classification.

In the 2009 Tour he and Julian Dean were shot by an air rifle during the 13th stage from Vittel to Colmar. He was shot in the thigh and finished the stage 117th.[1]

Freire’s career has been blighted with injury and lay-offs. He had back problems, saddle sores and neck problems.

Palmarès

1997
2nd Silver medal blank.svg U23 Road Race World Championships
1998
1st Stage 1 Vuelta a Castilla y León
3rd Spanish National Road Race Championships
1999
1st MaillotMundial.PNG Road Race World Championship
2000
1st Stage 2 Vuelta a España
1st Stage 4 Vuelta a España
1st Stage 1 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Stage 6 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Stage 3 Vuelta a Aragon
1st Stage 4 Vuelta a Aragon
1st Points classification
1st Stage 3 Giro della Provincia di Lucca
1st Stage 3 Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana
1st Trofeo Mallorca
3rd Bronze medal blank.svg Road Race World Championship
3rd Milan-Sanremo
2001
1st MaillotMundial.PNG Road Race World Championship
1st Stage 5 Vuelta a Burgos
1st Points classification
1st Stage 4 Deutschland Tour
2002
1st Stage 2 Tour de France
1st Manacor-Porto Cristo
1st Cala Rajada – Cala Millor
2003
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Giro della Provincia di Lucca
1st Stage 1
1st Stage 2
1st Stage 1 Vuelta a Andalucía
1st Stage 2 Vuelta a Andalucía
1st Points classification
1st Stage 7 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Stage 5 Volta a Catalunya
2004
1st MaillotMundial.PNG Road Race World Championship
1st Milan-Sanremo
1st Stage 6 Vuelta a España
1st Stage 3 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Trofeo Luis Puig
1st Trofeo Cala Millor – Cala Rajada
2005
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Tirenno-Adriatico
1st Stage 2
1st Stage 3
1st Stage 4
1st Points classification
1st Brabantse Pijl
1st Trofeo Alcudia
1st Trofeo Mallorca
2006
1st Stage 5 Tour de France
1st Stage 9 Tour de France
1st Stage 7 Tour de Suisse
1st Stage 4 Vuelta al País Vasco
1st Stage 3 Tirenno-Adriatico
1st Vattenfall Cyclassics
1st Brabantse Pijl
2007
1st Milan-Sanremo
1st Stage 2 Vuelta a España
1st Stage 5 Vuelta a España
1st Stage 6 Vuelta a España
Held Jersey gold.svg Gold jersey wearer From Stages 2-3
1st Trofeo Mallorca
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Vuelta a Andalucía
1st Stage 2
1st Stage 5
1st Points classification
1st Brabantse Pijl
2nd Vattenfall Cyclassics
3rd Gent-Wevelgem
3rd Paris-Tours
2008
1st Stage 1 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Stage 4 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Stage 6 Tirreno-Adriatico
1st Points classification
1st Gent-Wevelgem
1st Stage 1 Tour de Suisse
1st Stage 14 Tour de France
1st Jersey green.svg Points Classification
1st Stage 11 Vuelta a España
2009
1st Stage 2 Tour de Romandie
1st Stage 5 Tour de Romandie
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Oscar Camenzind
Romāns Vainšteins
Igor Astarloa
UCI Road Race World Champion
1999
2001
2004
Succeeded by
Romāns Vainšteins
Mario Cipollini
Tom Boonen
Preceded by
Italy Paolo Bettini
Italy Filippo Pozzato
Winner of Milan-Sanremo
2004
2007
Succeeded by
Italy Alessandro Petacchi
Switzerland Fabian Cancellara

References

External links








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