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(90568) 2004 GV9
Discovery[1]
Discovered by NEAT
Discovery date April 13, 2004
Designations
MPC designation (90568) 2004 GV9
Alternate name none
Minor planet
category
Cubewano (MPC)[2]
Extended (DES)[3]
Epoch January 30, 2005 (JD2453400.5)
Aphelion 45.7403 AU
Perihelion 38.7336 AU
Semi-major axis 42.2369 AU
Eccentricity 0.0830
Orbital period 274.5028 y
Mean anomaly 20.3717 °
Inclination 21.9702 °
Longitude of ascending node 250.6281 °
Argument of perihelion 292.9643 °
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 677±70 km[5]
Mass 1.1–5.0 × 1020 kg[6]
Mean density ? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity ? m/s²
Escape velocity ? km/s
Sidereal rotation
period
? d
Albedo 0.08±0.02[5]
Temperature ~? K
Spectral type B-V=0.95, V-R=0.52[7]
B0-V0=0.843[8]
Apparent magnitude 19.9[9]
Absolute magnitude (H) 3.9[4]

(90568) 2004 GV9 (also written (90568) 2004 GV9) is a trans-Neptunian object. It was discovered on April 13, 2004 by NEAT.[1] It is currently listed as a cubewano by the Minor Planet Center.[2]

The Spitzer Space Telescope has estimated it to have a diameter of 677±70 km.[5] This qualifies it as a dwarf planet candidate.

It has been observed 47 times with precovery images back to 1954.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b Spahr, Timothy B. (2004-04-14). "MPEC 2004-G32 : 2004 GV9". IAU Minor Planet Center. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/mpec/K04/K04G32.html. Retrieved 2010-01-06.  
  2. ^ a b "MPEC 2009-R09 : DISTANT MINOR PLANETS (2009 SEPT. 16.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2009-09-04. http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/mpec/K09/K09R09.html. Retrieved 2009-10-04.  
  3. ^ Marc W. Buie (2004-06-09 using 46 of 47 observations). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 90568". SwRI (Space Science Department). http://www.boulder.swri.edu/~buie/kbo/astrom/90568.html. Retrieved 2009-10-04.  
  4. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 90568 (2004 GV9)". 2004-06-09 last obs. http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=90568. Retrieved 2009-08-28.  
  5. ^ a b c John Stansberry, Will Grundy, Mike Brown, Dale Cruikshank, John Spencer, David Trilling, Jean-Luc Margot (2007). "Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope". University of Arizona, Lowell Observatory, California Institute of Technology, NASA Ames Research Center, Southwest Research Institute, Cornell University. http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0702538v2. Retrieved 2008-07-24.  
  6. ^ (Radius of 303.5 km and density of 0.97 = 1.1 × 1020 kg mass. Radius of 373.5 km and density of 2.3 = 5.0 × 1020 kg mass)
  7. ^ Tegler, Stephen C. (2007-02-01). "Kuiper Belt Object Magnitudes and Surface Colors". http://www.physics.nau.edu/~tegler/research/survey.htm. Retrieved 2009-12-30.  
  8. ^ David L. Rabinowitz, Bradley E. Schaefer, Martha W. Schaefer, Suzanne W. Tourtellotte (2008). "The Youthful Appearance of the 2003 EL61 Collisional Family". ArXiv.org. http://arxiv.org/abs/0804.2864. Retrieved 2008-09-20.  
  9. ^ "AstDys (90568) 2004GV9 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. http://hamilton.dm.unipi.it/astdys/index.php?pc=1.1.3.0&n=90568. Retrieved 2009-10-06.  

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