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1,4,6-Androstatrien-3,17-dione
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(8R,9S,10R,13S,14S)-10,13-dimethyl-9,11,12,14,15,16-hexahydro-8H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthrene-3,17-dione
Identifiers
CAS number 633-35-2
ATC code  ?
PubChem 104880
Chemical data
Formula C 19H22O2  
Mol. mass 282
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Metabolism Hepatic
Half life Minutes
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat. X(US)
Legal status  ? (US)
Routes Parenteral

1,4,6-Androstatrien-3,17-dione (ATD) is a potent irreversible aromatase inhibitor that inhibits estrogen biosynthesis by permanently binding and inactivating aromatase in adipose and peripheral tissue.[1] It is used to control estrogen synthesis.[2]

ATD is present in some over-the-counter bodybuilding supplements as well as Topical ATD solutions that work transdermally. While not banned, ATD may cause positive urinanalysis results leading to disqualification from competitive sports. ATD has many names in sports supplements including: 1,4,6 etiollochan-dione, 3, 17-keto-etiochol-triene, androst-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione and many others. These all refer to CAS# 633-35-2.

There is a patent-pending in the United States of America for the use of ATD in some areas (e.g., raising testosterone levels or increasing athletic performance). See U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/590,108, filed Jul. 21, 2004.

A related agent is exemestane (Aromasin).

References

  1. ^ Covey DF, Hood WF. (1981). "Enzyme-generated intermediates derived from 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione and 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione cause a time-dependent decrease in human placental aromatase activity". Endocrinology 108 (4): 1597-9. PMID 7472286.
  2. ^ Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth; Cary H Leung (2006-07-06). "Sex steroids modulate changes in social and sexual preference during juvenile development in zebra finches". Hormones and Behaviour (Elsevier Inc) 50 (5): 772–778. doi:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2006.07.003. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WGC-4KNMB80-2&_user=126523&_coverDate=12%2F31%2F2006&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000010358&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=126523&md5=e8f6a30073440028b6141ba18340af16. Retrieved 2007-10-07.  

Further reading

  1. ^ Covey DF, Hood WF. (1981). "Enzyme-generated intermediates derived from 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione and 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione cause a time-dependent decrease in human placental aromatase activity". Endocrinology 108 (4): 1597-9. PMID 7472286.
  2. Ellinwood WE, Hess DL, Roselli CE, Spies HG, Resko JA (1984). "Inhibition of aromatization stimulates luteinizing hormone and testosterone secretion in adult male rhesus monkeys". J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 59 (6): 1088–96. PMID 6541658.  
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