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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 9th century10th century11th century
Decades: 970s  980s  990s  – 1000s –  1010s  1020s  1030s
Years: 997 998 99910001001 1002 1003
1000 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
1000 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1000
M
Ab urbe condita 1753
Armenian calendar 449
ԹՎ ՆԽԹ
Bahá'í calendar -844 – -843
Bengali calendar 407
Berber calendar 1950
Buddhist calendar 1544
Burmese calendar 362
Byzantine calendar 6508 – 6509
Chinese calendar 己亥年十一月廿二日
(3636/3696-11-22)
— to —
庚子年十二月初三日
(3637/3697-12-3)
Coptic calendar 716 – 717
Ethiopian calendar 992 – 993
Hebrew calendar 4760 – 4761
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1055 – 1056
 - Shaka Samvat 922 – 923
 - Kali Yuga 4101 – 4102
Holocene calendar 11000
Iranian calendar 378 – 379
Islamic calendar 390 – 391
Japanese calendar
Korean calendar 3333
Thai solar calendar 1543

Year 1000 (M) of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium of the Christian era ending on December 31st. According to the then used Julian Calendar, AD 1000 was a leap year starting on Monday. In the Gregorian Calendar (not invented at the time) the year would have been a common year starting on Wednesday.

Contents

Overview

China

In what is today China the Song "Dynasty" remained the worlds strongest empire and continued to thrive under Emperor "Zhenzong" of Song China. By the late 11th century the Song Dynasty had a total population of some 101 million people an average annual iron output of 125,000 tons and had bolstered its Economy of the Song Dynasty enormous economy with the worlds first known "Banknote" paper printed money.

Muslim world

The Islamic world was experiencing a Golden Age around the year 1000 and continued to flourish under the Islamic Empire (including the Ummayad, Abbasid and Fatimid caliphates), which included what is now the Middle East, North Africa, Central Asia and Iberian Peninsula. By 1000, Muslim traders and explorers had established a global economy across the Old World leading to a Muslim Agricultural Revolution, establishing the Arab Empire as the world's leading extensive economic power.

The scientific achievements of the Islamic civilization also reaches its zenith during this time, with the emergence of the first experimental scientists and the scientific method, which would form the basis of modern science.

Most of the leading scientists around the year 1000 were Muslim scientists, including Ibn al-Haytham (Alhacen), Abu Rayhan al-Biruni, Avicenna, Abu al-Qasim (Abulcasis), Ibn Yunus, Abu Sahl al-Quhi (Kuhi), Abu-Mahmud al-Khujandi, Abu Nasr Mansur, Abu al-Wafa, Ahmad ibn Fadlan, Al-Muqaddasi, Ali Ibn Isa, and al-Karaji (al-Karkhi), among others.

In particular, Ibn al-Haytham, Avicenna, Abu Rayhan al-Biruni, and Abu al-Qasim, who all flourished around the year 1000, are considered to be among the greatest scientists in history.

Events

By place

Africa

Americas

  • Charles C. Mann’s 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (Vintage Books, 2005) gives a guided tour and map of “Native America, 1000 A. D.,“ (pp. 22-30) describing the numerous, populous and highly developed cultures of what we now call South America, Meso-America, and North America.

Asia

Europe

Europe in 1000

By topic

Art

Religion

Science and Technology

World Population

Births

Deaths

See also

Further reading

  • Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium (1999) ISBN 0-316-55840-0
  • John Man Atlas of the Year 1000 (1999) ISBN 0-14-051419-8

References


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

This page is a placeholder for a page about the year 1000. The Wikiquote community has not yet come to a consensus on what this page, and calendar-year pages generally, ought to say. Please discuss any suggestions for the contents of year pages at the Village pump. In the meantime, Wikipedia's 1000 article offers a list of noteworthy events of this year.

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

Translingual

Symbol

1000 (previous 999, next 1001)

  1. the number one thousand
    Exponential notation: 103

Alternative forms

See also

  • 10000/10,000/1,0000/10 000/10.000
  • 1,000/1 000/1.000
  • 100

Simple English

Centuries: 9th century · 10th century · 11th century
Decades: 970s 980s 990s 1000s 1010s 1020s 1030s
Years: 997 998 999 1000 1001 1002 1003
1000 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar1000
Ab urbe condita1753
Chinese calendar3636 – 3637
Hebrew calendar4759 – 4760
Hindu calendars
Vikram Samvat
Shaka Samvat
Kali Yuga

1055 – 1056
922 – 923
4101 – 4102
Iranian calendar378 – 379
Islamic calendar420 – 421
Runic calendar1250

1000 (M) of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium of the Christian era ending on December 31. According to the then used Julian Calendar, AD 1000 was a leap year starting on Monday. In the Gregorian Calendar (not invented at the time) the year would have been a common year starting on Wednesday.

It is one of only seven years to use just one Roman numeral. The seven are 1 AD (I), 5 AD (V), 10 AD (X), 50 AD (L), 100 AD (C), 500 AD (D), and 1000 AD (M).

Events

Births

Deaths








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