100 Mile House, British Columbia: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

100 Mile House
—  District Municipality  —
100 Mile House Museum
Motto: We are open for business.
100 Mile House is located in British Columbia
100 Mile House
Location of 100 Mile House in British Columbia
Coordinates: 51°38′31″N 121°17′50″W / 51.64194°N 121.29722°W / 51.64194; -121.29722Coordinates: 51°38′31″N 121°17′50″W / 51.64194°N 121.29722°W / 51.64194; -121.29722
Country  Canada
Province  British Columbia
Region South Cariboo
Regional District Cariboo Regional District
Founded 1862
Incorporated 1965
Government
 - Mayor Mitch Campsall
Area
 - Total 51.34 km2 (19.8 sq mi)
Elevation 927 m (3,041 ft)
Population (2007)
 - Total 1,981
 - Density 38.58/km2 (99.9/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
Highways Highway 97
Waterways Bridge Creek

100 Mile House is a district municipality located in the South Cariboo region of central British Columbia, Canada.

Contents

History

100 Mile House was originally known as Bridge Creek House, named after the creek running through the area. Its origins as a settlement go back to the time when Thomas Miller owned a collection of ramshackle buildings serving the traffic of the fur trade. It acquired its current name during the Cariboo Gold Rush where a roadhouse was constructed in 1862, as a resting point for travellers moving between Kamloops and Fort Alexandria, which was 98 miles (158 km) north of 100 Mile House. The roadhouse was located 100 miles (160 km) up the Old Cariboo Road that originated at Lillooet (the beginning of involved land travel after a series of river, numerous lakes, and portage trails known as the Douglas Road).

In 1930, Lord Martin Cecil left England to come to 100 Mile House and manage the estate owned by his father, the Marquess of Exeter. The town, which at the time consisted of the roadhouse, a general store, a post office, telegraph office and a power plant, had a population of 12. The original road house burned down in 1937.

Economy

100 Mile House's welcome sign

At present, 100 Mile House is the primary service centre for the South Cariboo and has a population of approximately 2,000. The service area has a population roughly ten times the size of the town. It includes the communities of Lac La Hache, Forest Grove, Lone Butte, Bridge Lake, 70 Mile House, Canim Lake, and 108 Mile Ranch, the largest residential centre between Kamloops and Williams Lake.

The primary industries of 100 Mile House are forestry and ranching. Log home building and tourism are also an important part of the community.

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Tourism

100 Mile House is a centre for outdoor activities and is becoming increasingly known for its richness of bird life. The surrounding area features many lakes for boating and fishing including Lac La Hache, Canim Lake, Horse Lake, Green Lake, and Bridge Lake. The Cariboo ski marathon attracts a large and international field of cross-country (Nordic) skiers.

Climate

Weather data for 100 Mile House
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 12
(54)
13.5
(56)
21
(70)
30
(86)
34.5
(94)
34.5
(94)
35.5
(96)
36
(97)
36
(97)
29
(84)
18.3
(65)
12.5
(55)
Average high °C (°F) -3.2
(26)
1.6
(35)
6.6
(44)
12
(54)
16.6
(62)
20
(68)
23
(73)
23
(73)
18.2
(65)
11.2
(52)
2.2
(36)
-2.8
(27)
10.7
(51)
Average low °C (°F) -13.5
(8)
-10.1
(14)
-6.2
(21)
-2.1
(28)
2
(36)
5.6
(42)
7.4
(45)
6.5
(44)
2.5
(37)
-1.6
(29)
-6.7
(20)
-12.5
(10)
-2.4
(28)
Record low °C (°F) -44.5
(-48)
-40.5
(-41)
-37.8
(-36)
-15
(5)
-9
(16)
-4
(25)
-1.5
(29)
-6
(21)
-10
(14)
-32
(-26)
-40.5
(-41)
-48
(-54)
Precipitation mm (inches) 38.1
(1.5)
23.4
(0.92)
16.6
(0.65)
23.6
(0.93)
40.9
(1.61)
56.6
(2.23)
59.7
(2.35)
45.4
(1.79)
33.8
(1.33)
29.2
(1.15)
39.2
(1.54)
46.9
(1.85)
453.3
(17.85)
Source: Environment Canada[1] 2009-22-10

See also

References

External links


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