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105th United States Congress
USCapitol.jpg
United States Capitol (2002)

Duration: January 3, 1997 – January 3, 1999

President of the Senate: Al Gore
President pro tempore: Strom Thurmond
Speaker of the House: Newt Gingrich
Members: 100 Senators
435 Representatives
5 Non-voting members
Senate Majority: Republican Party
House Majority: Republican Party

Sessions
1st: January 7, 1997 – November 13, 1997
2nd: January 27, 1998 – December 19, 1998
<104th 106th>

The One Hundred Fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1997 to January 3, 1999, during the fifth and sixth years of Bill Clinton's presidency. Apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-first Census of the United States in 1990. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

Contents

Major events

Major legislation

Major resolutions

Party summary

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Senate

There was no change in the parties during this Congress.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Vacant
End of previous Congress 53 47 100 0
105th Congress 55 45 100 0
Final voting share 55% 45%
Beginning of the next Congress 55 45 100 0

House of Representatives

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Independent Vacant
End of previous Congress 231 203 1 435 0
Begin 228 206 1 435 0
End 227 207
Final voting share 52.2% 47.6% 0.2%
Beginning of the next Congress 223 211 1 435 0
Non-voting members 1 4 0 5 0
House seats by party holding plurality in state
     80.1–100% Republican      80.1–100% Democratic
     60.1–80% Republican      60.1–80% Democratic
     50.1–60% Republican      50.1–60% Democratic
     striped: 50–50 split      1 independent

Leadership

Contents: Senate: Majority (R), Minority (D)House: Majority (R), Minority (D)

Senate

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

House of Representatives

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

Skip to House of Representatives, below

Senate

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

House of Representatives

The names of members of the House of Representatives are preceded by their district numbers.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Non-voting delegations

Changes in membership

Senate

There were no changes in Senate membership during this Congress.

House of Representatives

Four members of the House of Representatives died, and four resigned.

Date seat became vacant District Previous Reason for change Subsequent Date of successor's taking office
January 30, 1997 Texas's 28th Frank Tejeda (D) Died Ciro D. Rodriguez (D) April 12, 1997
February 13, 1997 New Mexico 3rd Bill Richardson (D) Resigned to become Ambassador to the United Nations Bill Redmond (R) May 20, 1997
August 2, 1997 New York 13th Susan Molinari (R) Resigned to become a television journalist for CBS Vito Fossella (R) November 5, 1997
October 28, 1997 California 22nd Walter H. Capps (D) Died Lois Capps (D) March 17, 1998
November 11, 1997 Pennsylvania 1st Thomas M. Foglietta (D) Resigned to become Ambassador to Italy Robert A. Brady (D) May 21, 1998
November 17, 1997 New York 6th Floyd H. Flake (D) Resigned to return full time to his duties as pastor of Allen A.M.E. Church Gregory Meeks (D) February 5, 1998
January 5, 1998 California 44th Sonny Bono (R) Died Mary Bono (R) April 21, 1998
February 6, 1998 California 9th Ronald Dellums (D) Resigned Barbara Lee (D) April 21, 1998
March 25, 1998 New Mexico 1st Steven Schiff (R) Died Heather Wilson (R) June 25, 1998

Employees

Senate

House of Representatives

External links


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