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1892 Major League Baseball season: Wikis

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1892 throughout the world.  

Contents

Champions

National League final standings

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First half of season

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Boston Beaneaters 52 22 .702 --
Brooklyn Grooms 51 26 .662 2.5
Philadelphia Phillies 46 30 .605 7
Cincinnati Reds 44 31 .587 8.5
Cleveland Spiders 40 33 .548 11.5
Pittsburgh Pirates 37 39 .487 16
Washington Senators 35 41 .461 18
Chicago Colts 31 39 .443 19
St. Louis Browns 31 42 .425 20.5
New York Giants 31 43 .419 21
Louisville Colonels 30 47 .390 25.5
Baltimore Orioles 20 55 .267 34.5

Second half of season

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Cleveland Spiders 53 23 .697 --
Boston Beaneaters 50 26 .658 3
Brooklyn Grooms 44 33 .571 9.5
Pittsburgh Pirates 43 34 .558 10.5
Philadelphia Phillies 41 36 .532 12.5
New York Giants 40 37 .519 13.5
Chicago Colts 39 37 .513 14
Cincinnati Reds 38 37 .507 14.5
Louisville Colonels 33 42 .440 19.5
Baltimore Orioles 26 46 .361 25
St. Louis Browns 25 52 .325 28.5
Washington Senators 23 52 .307 29.5

Overall record

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Boston Beaneaters 102 48 .680 --
Cleveland Spiders 93 56 .624 8.5
Brooklyn Grooms 95 59 .617 9
Philadelphia Phillies 87 66 .569 16.5
Cincinnati Reds 82 68 .547 20
Pittsburgh Pirates 80 73 .523 23.5
Chicago Colts 70 76 .479 30
New York Giants 71 80 .470 31.5
Louisville Colonels 63 89 .414 40
Washington Senators 58 93 .384 44.5
St. Louis Browns 56 94 .373 46
Baltimore Orioles 46 101 .313 54.5

Events

  • October 17 - The first-half champion Boston Beaneaters and second-half champion Cleveland Spiders begin a five-game series to determine the overall championship. The first game, pitched by Jack Stivetts for the Beaneaters and Cy Young for the Spiders, ends in a 0-0 tie after 11 innings.
  • November 17 - National League magnates conclude a four-day meeting in Chicago where they agree to shorten the 1893 schedule to 132 games and drop the double championship concept. They also pledge to continue to reduce player salaries and other team expenses.

Births

January-February

March-April

May-June

July-August

September-October

  • September 5 - Cap Crowell
  • September 7 - Ginger Shinault
  • September 9 - Tiny Graham
  • September 11 - Ernie Koob
  • September 15 - Harry Lunte
  • September 17 - Tommy Taylor
  • September 21 - Elmer Smith
  • October 3 - Jack Richardson
  • October 4 - Delos Brown
  • October 7 - Adam Debus
  • October 8 - Harry Baumgartner
  • October 9 - Arnie Stone
  • October 10 - Rich Durning
  • October 12 - Rupert Mills
  • October 13 - Chris Burkam
  • October 17 - Frank Madden
  • October 17 - Ted Welch
  • October 18 - Coonie Blank
  • October 18 - Bill Johnson
  • October 19 - Michael Driscoll
  • October 22 - Norm McNeil
  • October 24 - Dick Niehaus
  • October 28 - Bill McCabe
  • October 31 - Ray O'Brien

November-December

Deaths

  • January 14 - Silver Flint, 36, catcher with the Chicago White Stockings for eleven seasons who batted .310 for 1881 champions
  • March 11 - Cinders O'Brien, 24, pitcher for four seasons. Won 22 games for the 1889 Cleveland Spiders.
  • April 18 - Ned Bligh, 27, catcher for four seasons, died of Typhoid fever.
  • May 21 - Hub Collins, 28, second baseman for the 1889-90 champion Brooklyn teams who led league in doubles and runs once each
  • July 12 - Alexander Cartwright, 72, pioneer of the sport who formulated the first rules in 1845, developing a new sport for adults out of various existing playground games; established distance between bases at 90 feet, introduced concept of foul territory, set the number of players at nine per team, and fixed the number of outs at three per side and innings at nine; founded Knickerbocker Base Ball Club, the sport's first organized club, in New York City, and spread the sport across the nation into the 1850s
  • November 3 - Edgar Smith, 30, played in four seasons with four different teams from 1883 to 1885, and 1890.
  • December 20 - John Fitzgerald, 26, pitcher for the 1890 Rochester Broncos

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