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The 1906 British Home Championship was the 22nd edition of the annual international football tournament played between the British Home Nations. The trophy was shared between the two sides which regulaly dominated the competition, England and Scotland who each gained four points.

England and Ireland began the tournament in February 1906, with England scoring five goals without reply and riing to the head of the table. Wales joined them after their match with Scotland which they won in Edinburgh 2–0. Scotland recovered to beat Ireland by a single goal and England then moved ahead by beating Wales with an identical scoreline. Playing for lower rankings, Wales and Ireland fought out a thrilling 4–4 draw in Cardiff before the deciding game between England and Scotland. England needed only a draw to take the trophy undisputed, but Scotland played well and in flowing match triumphed 2–1 to share the honours.

Table

Team Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
 England 4 3 2 0 1 7 2 +5
 Scotland 4 3 2 0 1 3 3 0
 Wales 3 3 1 1 1 6 5 +1
 Ireland 1 3 0 1 2 4 10 −6

The points system worked as follows:

  • 2 points for a win
  • 1 point for a draw

Results


17 February 1906
Ireland  0 – 5  England Solitude Ground, Belfast
  Dicky Bond 2, Arthur Brown, Stanley Harris, Samuel Day

3 March 1906
Scotland  0 – 2  Wales Tynecastle Park, Edinburgh
  Lot Jones, James Jones

17 March 1906
Ireland  0 – 1  Scotland Dalymount Park, Dublin
  Thomas Fitchie

19 March 1906
Wales  0 – 1  England Cardiff Arms Park, Cardiff
  Samuel Day

2 April 1906
Wales  4 – 4  Ireland Racecourse Ground, Wrexham
William Green 3, Hugh Morgan-Owen Jimmy Maxwell 2, Harold Sloan 2

7 April 1906
Scotland  2 – 1  England Hampden Park, Glasgow
James Howie 2 Albert Shepherd

References

  • Guy Oliver (1992). The Guinness Record of World Soccer. Guinness. ISBN 0-851129-54-4.  
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