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The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world.  

Contents

Champions

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Dale Alexander BOX .367 Lefty O'Doul BRO .368
HR Jimmie Foxx PHA 58 Chuck Klein PHI
Mel Ott NYG
38
RBI Jimmie Foxx PHA 169 Don Hurst PHI 143
Wins Alvin Crowder WSH 26 Lon Warneke PIT 22
ERA Lefty Grove PHA 2.84 Lon Warneke PIT 2.37
Ks Red Ruffing NYY 190 Dizzy Dean STL 191

Major league baseball final standings

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American League final standings

American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
New York Yankees 107 47 .695 --
Philadelphia Athletics 94 60 .610 13
Washington Senators 93 61 .604 14
Cleveland Indians 87 65 .572 19
Detroit Tigers 76 75 .503 29.5
St. Louis Browns 63 91 .409 44
Chicago White Sox 49 102 .325 56.5
Boston Red Sox 43 111 .279 64

National League final standings

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Chicago Cubs 90 64 .584 --
Pittsburgh Pirates 86 68 .558 4
Brooklyn Dodgers 81 73 .526 9
Philadelphia Phillies 78 76 .506 12
Boston Braves 77 77 .500 13
New York Giants 72 82 .468 18
St. Louis Cardinals 72 82 .468 18
Cincinnati Reds 60 94 .390 30

Negro League Baseball final standings

East-West League standings

East-West League*
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Detroit Wolves 38 12 .760
Homestead Grays 54 28 .659
Baltimore Black Sox 41 41 .500
Cuban Stars (West) 16 19 .471
Philadelphia Hilldale 19 31 .380
Washington Pilots 16 35 .318
Cleveland Stars 5 11 .313

Pittsburgh Crawfords


54

32

.628
New York Black Yankees 14 11 .560

* The East-West League folded before the end of the season, so a championship was not awarded.

† Pittsburgh and New York were not in the league, but their games are included in the statistics compiled by John Holway.

Source: Holway, John B. (2001). The Complete Book of Baseball's Negro Leagues: The Other Half of Baseball History. Fern Park, FL: Hastings House Publishers. p. 288. ISBN 0803820070.  

Events

  • May 30 - The New York Yankees unveil a plaque dedicated to their former manager, Miller Huggins. It is the first of what will eventually be a large number of plaques and other monuments to Yankee personnel.[1 ]
  • October 1 - Lou Gehrig hits two home runs, as does teammate Babe Ruth, as the New York Yankees defeat the Chicago Cubs, 7–5 in Game 3 of the World Series. It is Ruth's second home run that is historic. Batting against Charlie Root in the fifth inning, with two strikes, Ruth is seen to gesture, according to some toward the outfield fence, before hitting the home run. While it is not universally accepted that Ruth was predicting a home run, it is referred to as "the called shot".[1 ]
  • November 22 - St. Louis Cardinals shortstop Charlie Gelbert shatters his leg in a hunting accident. He will return as a part-time infielder in 1935, playing until 1940.

Births

January-April

May-August

September-December

Deaths

  • February 5 - Barney Dreyfuss, 66, owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates since 1900 who was principal force in creation of the World Series; Pirates won six NL pennants and two World Series (1909, 1925) under his leadership; built Forbes Field, first modern steel and concrete stadium, in 1909
  • February 21 - John Peters, 48, catcher for the Detroit Tigers, Cleveland Indians and Philadelphia Phillies between 1915 and 1922
  • March 3 - Ed Morris, 32, pitcher for the Chicago Cubs and Boston Red Sox between 1922 and 1931, who won 19 games for the last place Red Sox in 1928
  • March 23 - Charles F. Daniels, 83, one of the NL's original 1876 umpires; career of 25 years included ten major league seasons
  • April 2 - Honest John Morrill, 79, first baseman and manager of Boston's 1883 NL champions who batted .300 twice and was among first ten players to reach 1000 hits
  • April 10 - Fred Pfeffer, 72, second baseman for Chicago and Louisville who in 1884 was one of first players to hit 20 home runs; led league in putouts nine times and double plays seven times
  • April 16 - Johnny Lucas, 29, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox from 1931-32
  • April 18 - Ike Benners, 75, left fielder for the 1884 Brooklyn Atlantics and the Wilmington Quicksteps.
  • April 23 - Lon Knight, 78, right fielder and manager of Philadelphia's 1883 American Association champions
  • July 21 - Bill Gleason, 73, shortstop for three different teams of the Amertican Association from 1882-89, and a member of three St. Louis Browns champion teams from 1885-87
  • August 2 - Dan Brouthers, 74, first baseman who was 19th century's greatest slugger, winning five batting titles and retiring with a .342 lifetime average; .519 career slugging percentage was record until 1920s, led NL in HRs twice and doubles three times; third player to hit 100 home runs and fourth to reach 2000 hits; batted .338 with league-leading 153 runs for 1887 Detroit champions
  • August 16 - Candy LaChance, 63, first baseman of the 1903 World's championship team Boston Americans
  • September 19 - Otto Neu, 38, shortstop for the 1917 St. Louis Browns

References

  1. ^ a b c d Total Baseball V; Thorn, John et al editors; Viking Penguin; 1997; p. 2008
  2. ^ Total Baseball V; Thorn, John et al editors; Viking Penguin; 1997; p. 2006

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