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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century20th century21st century
Decades: 1900s  1910s  1920s  – 1930s –  1940s  1950s  1960s
Years: 1935 1936 193719381939 1940 1941
1938 by topic
Subject: ArchaeologyArchitectureArtAviationFilmLiterature (Poetry) – MeteorologyMusic (Country) – Rail transportRadioScienceSportsTelevision
Countries: AustraliaCanada – Ecuador – France – Germany – IndiaIreland – Italy – Malaysia – New ZealandNorway – Philippines – Singapore – South Africa– Soviet Union – UKUSA – Zimbabwe
Leaders: Sovereign statesState leadersReligious leadersLaw
Categories: BirthsDeathsWorksIntroductionsEstablishmentsDisestablishmentsAwards

Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar.

Contents

Events of 1938

January–February

January 20: King Farouk
January 16: Benny Goodman in NYC.
January 27: Niagara Bridge collapses in ice.

March–April

May–June

July–August

September–October

  • September – The European crisis over German demands for annexation of the Sudeten borderland of Czechoslovakia heats up.
  • September 2 – Soviet Ambassador to Britain Ivan Maisky calls on Winston Churchill, to tell him that Soviet Foreign Commissar Maxim Litvinov has expressed to the French charge d'affaire in Moscow that the Soviet Union is willing to fight over the territorial integrity of Czechoslovakia.
  • September 4 – During the ceremony marking the unveiling of a plaque at Pointe de Grave, France celebrating Franco-American friendship, American Ambassador William Bullitt in a speech states, "France and the United States were united in war and peace", leading to much speculation in the press that if war did break out over Czechoslovakia, then the United States would join the war on the Allied side.
  • September 5 – Czechoslovakian President Edvard Beneš invites mid-level representatives of the Sudeten Germans to the Hradcany palace, to tell them he will accept whatever demands they care to make, provided the Sudetenland remains part of the Republic of Czechoslovakia.
  • September 6 – What eventually proves to be the last of the "Nuremberg Rallies" begins. It draws worldwide attention because it is widely assumed Hitler, in his closing remarks, will signal whether there will be peace with or war over Czechoslovakia.
  • September 7 – The Times publishes a lead article which calls on Czechoslovakia to cede the Sudetenland to Germany.
  • September 9 - U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt disallows the popular interpretation of Bullitt’s speech at a press conference at the White House. Roosevelt states it is “100% wrong” the U.S. would join a “stop-Hitler bloc” under any circumstances, and makes it quite clear that in the event of German aggression against Czechoslovakia, the U.S. would remain neutral.
  • September 10 – Hermann Göring, in a speech at Nuremberg, calls the Czechs a "miserable pygmy race" who are "harassing the human race." That same evening, Edvard Beneš, President of Czechoslovakia, makes a broadcast in which he appeals for calm.
  • September 12 – Hitler makes his much-anticipated closing address at Nuremberg, in which he vehemently attacks the Czech people and President Beneš. American news commentator Hans von Kaltenborn begins his famous marathon of broadcast bulletins over the CBS Radio Network with a summation of Hitler's address.
  • September 13 – The followers of Konrad Henlein begin an armed revolt against the Czechoslovak government in Sudetenland. Martial law is declared and after much bloodshed on both sides order is temporarily restored. Neville Chamberlain personally sends a telegram to Hitler urgently requesting that they both meet.
  • September 15 – Neville Chamberlain arrives in Berchtesgaden to begin negotiations with Hitler over the Sudetenland.
  • September 17 – Neville Chamberlain returns temporarily to London to confer with his cabinet.
  • September 18 – During a meeting between Neville Chamberlain and the recently elected Premier of France, Édouard Daladier, and Daladier's Foreign Minister, Georges Bonnet, it becomes apparent that neither the English nor the French governments are prepared to go to war over the Sudetenland.
  • September 21
    • In the early hours of the day, representatives of the French and British governments call on Czechoslovak President Edvard Beneš to tell him France and Britain will not fight Hitler if he decides to annex the Sudetenland by force. Late in the afternoon the Czechoslovak government capitulates to the French and British demands.
    • Winston Churchill warns of grave consequences to European security if Czechoslovakia is partitioned. The same day, Soviet Foreign Commissar Maxim Litvinov makes a similar statement in the League of Nations.
    • The New England Hurricane of 1938 strikes Long Island and southern New England, killing over 300 along the Rhode Island shoreline and 600 altogether.
  • September 22
    • Unable to survive the previous day's capitulation to the demands of the English and French governments, Czechoslovak premier Milan Hodža resigns. General Jan Syrovy takes his place.
    • Neville Chamberlain arrives in the city of Godesberg for another round of talks with Hitler over the Sudetenland crisis. Hitler raises his demands to include occupation of all German Sudeten territories by October 1. That night after a telephone conference, Chamberlain reverses himself and advises the Czechoslovaks to mobilize.
    • Olsen and Johnson's musical comedy revue Hellzapoppin' begins its 3-year run on Broadway.
  • September 23 – The Czechoslovak army mobilizes.
  • September 24 -
    • Sir Eric Phipps, British Ambassador to France, reports to London that "all that is best in France is against war, almost at any price", being opposed only by a "small, but noisy and corrupt, war group". Phipp's report creates major doubts about the ability and/or willingness of France to go to war.
    • At 1:30 AM, Adolf Hitler and Neville Chamberlain conclude their talks on the Sudetenland. Chamberlain agrees to take Hitler's demands, codified in the Godesberg Memorandum, personally to the Czech Government. The Czech Government rejects the demands, as does Chamberlain's own cabinet. The French Government also initially rejects the terms and orders a partial mobilizaton of the French army.
  • September 26 – In a vitriolic speech at Berlin's Sportpalast, Hitler defies the world and implies war with Czechoslovakia will begin at any time.
  • September 28 – As his self-imposed October 1 deadline for occupation of the Sudetenland approaches, Adolf Hitler invites Italian Duce Benito Mussolini, French Premier Edourd Deladier, and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain to one last conference in Munich. The Czechs themselves are not invited.
  • September 29
    • Colonel Graham Christie, assistant British military attaché in Berlin, is informed by Carl Friedrich Goerdeler that the mobilization of the Royal Navy has badly damaged the popularity of the Nazi regime, as the German public realizes that Fall Grün is likely to cause a world war.
    • Munich Agreement: German, Italian, British and French leaders agree to German demands regarding annexation of the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia. The Czechoslovak government is largely excluded from the negotiations and is not a signatory to the agreement.
    • The Republic of Hatay is declared in Syria
  • September 30 – Neville Chamberlain returns to Britain from meeting with Adolf Hitler and declares "Peace In Our Time".
  • October – The Japanese Imperial Army largely overruns Canton.
  • October 1 – German troops march into the Sudetenland. The Polish government gives the Czech government an ultimatum stating that Zaolzie region must be handed over within twenty-four hours. The Czechs have little choice but to comply.
  • October 2
  • October 4 – The Republican forces in the Spanish Civil War begin withdrawing their foreign volunteers from combat as agreed on July 5.
  • October 5 – Edvard Beneš, president of Czechoslovakia, resigns.
  • October 10 – The Blue Water Bridge opens, connecting Port Huron, Michigan and Sarnia, Ontario.
  • October 16 – Winston Churchill, in a broadcast address to the United States, condemns the Munich Agreement as a defeat and calls upon America and western Europe to prepare for armed resistance against Hitler.
  • October 18 The German government expels 12,000 Polish Jews living in Germany; the Polish government accepts 4,000 and refuses admittance to the remaining 8,000, who are forced to live in the no-man’s land on the German-Polish frontier.
  • October 21 – In direct contravention of the recently signed Munich Agreement, Hitler circulates among his high command a secret memorandum stating that they should prepare for the "liquidation of the rest of Czechoslovakia" and the occupation of Memel.
  • October 24
  • October 27 – Du Pont announces a name for its new synthetic yarn: "nylon".
  • October 30 – Orson Welles's radio adaptation of The War of the Worlds is broadcast, causing panic in various parts of the United States.
  • October 31 – Great Depression: In an effort to try restore investor confidence, the New York Stock Exchange unveils a 15-point program aimed to upgrade protection for the investing public.

November–December

Undated

Ongoing

Births

1938 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1938
MCMXXXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2691
Armenian calendar 1387
ԹՎ ՌՅՁԷ
Bahá'í calendar 94 – 95
Bengali calendar 1345
Berber calendar 2888
Buddhist calendar 2482
Burmese calendar 1300
Byzantine calendar 7446 – 7447
Chinese calendar 丁丑年十一月三十日
(4574/4634-11-30)
— to —
戊寅年十一月初十日
(4575/4635-11-10)
Coptic calendar 1654 – 1655
Ethiopian calendar 1930 – 1931
Hebrew calendar 56985699
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1993 – 1994
 - Shaka Samvat 1860 – 1861
 - Kali Yuga 5039 – 5040
Holocene calendar 11938
Iranian calendar 1316 – 1317
Islamic calendar 1356 – 1357
Japanese calendar Shōwa 13
(昭和13年)
Korean calendar 4271
Thai solar calendar 2481

January–February

March–April

May–June

July–August

September–October

November–December

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

July–December

November 10 : Mustafa Kemal Atatürk

Nobel Prizes

References

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

This page is a placeholder for a page about the year 1938. The Wikiquote community has not yet come to a consensus on what this page, and calendar-year pages generally, ought to say. Please discuss any suggestions for the contents of year pages at the Village pump. In the meantime, Wikipedia's 1938 article offers a list of noteworthy events of this year.

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1900s  1910s  1920s  - 1930s -  1940s  1950s  1960s

Years: 1935 1936 1937 - 1938 - 1939 1940 1941
1938 by topic:
Subject:      Archaeology - Architecture - Art
Aviation - Film - Literature (Poetry)
Meteorology - Music (Country)
Rail transport - Radio - Science
Sports - Television
Countries:      Australia - Canada - India - Ireland - Malaysia - New Zealand - Norway - Singapore - South Africa - Soviet Union - UK - Zimbabwe
Leaders:    Sovereign states - State leaders
Religious leaders - Law
Categories: Births - Marriages - Deaths - Introductions
Establishments - Disestablishments - Awards

Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar.


Contents  (full)
1 Events of 1938
Jan. . Feb. . March . April
May . June . July  .  Aug.
Sept. . Oct. . Nov. .  Dec.
Undated . Ongoing
2 Births
3 Deaths
4 Nobel prizes
5 Ship events
6 See also -  Notes -  External links

Events of 1938

January-February

January 27: Niagara Bridge collapses in ice.

March-April

May-June

July-August

Crete

September-October

November-December

Undated

Ongoing

Births

1938 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1938
MCMXXXVIII

Ab urbe condita 2691
Armenian calendar 1387
ԹՎ ՌՅՁԷ
Bahá'í calendar 94 – 95
Buddhist calendar 2482
Coptic calendar 1654 – 1655
Ethiopian calendar 1930 – 1931
Hebrew calendar 5698 – 5699
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1993 – 1994
 - Shaka Samvat 1860 – 1861
 - Kali Yuga 5039 – 5040
Holocene calendar 11938
Iranian calendar 1316 – 1317
Islamic calendar 1356 – 1357
Japanese calendar Shōwa 13


(昭和 13年)

 - Imperial Year Kōki 2598
(皇紀2598年)
Julian calendar 1983
Korean calendar 4271
Thai solar calendar 2481

January-February

March-April

May-June

July-August

September-October

November-December

Date unknown

Deaths

January - June

July - December

Nobel prizes

Notes

People of the year 1938 at Familypedia

6 people were born in 1938

Father Mother Age mother at birth
Beatrix van Oranje-Nassau (1938-) Bernhard zur Lippe-Biesterfeld (1911-2004) Juliana van Oranje-Nassau (1909-2004) 2929
Geertruida Oudshoorn (1938-) Gijsbertus H. Oudshoorn (1919-1995) Jacoba M. van der Blom (1921-)
Antonius Tol (1938-) Paulus Tol (1909-1976) Dora Peereboom (1914-) 2424
Juan Carlos I de España (1938-) Juan de España (1913-1993) María Mercedes of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1910-2000)
Juan Carlos I de España (1938-) Juan de España (1913-1993) María Mercedes of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1910-2000)
Sophia of Greece (1938-) Paul of Greece (1901-1964) Frederica of Hanover (1917-1981)

3 children were born to the 2 women born in 1938

28 people died in 1938

Father Mother Age at death
Rachel Anthoney (1872-1938) Richard Anthoney (c1837-1929) Ann Betts (c1846-1902) 6666
Nina Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinck (1862-1938) Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck (1817-1865) Caroline Louise Burnaby (c1832-1918) 7676
Charles Henry Eldridge (1886-1938) James Jury Eldridge (1845-1918) Matilda Sophia Payne (1850-1921) 5252
Annie Maria Evenden (1870-1938) Edward Evenden (1848-1928) Emma Unicomb (1847-1928) 6868
Alfred Francis (1854-1938) Thomas Francis (1832-1880) Mary Ann Wooller (1834-1867) 8484
Daniel John Francis (c1877-1938) Thomas Francis (1845-1914) Emma Augusta Angel (1857-1884) 6161
Stella Jane Gillies (1890-1938) Duncan Gillies (1846-1933) Alice Ann Bath (1857-1925) 4848
Thomas David Grenfell (1887-1938) David Grenfell (?-?) Harriet Hampton (1865-1906) 5151
Jane Grieve (1865-1938) William Grieve (1828-1913) Jean Flett (1833-1912) 7373
Malcolm Grieve (1863-1938) William Grieve (1828-1913) Jean Flett (1833-1912) 7575
Alice Hampton (c1875-1938) William Henry Hampton (c1835-1911) Eliza Jane Stevens (c1839-1903) 6363
Muhammad Iqbal (1877) Shaikh Nur Muhammad 6161
Alice Victoria Joyce (1863-1938) Benjamin Joyce (1821-1890) Ann Trotter (1827-1907) 7575
William Charles Llewellyn (1858-1938) Robert Llewellyn (1810-1875) Mary Ann Stevens (c1820-1891) 8080
Florence Camelia Parkes (1865-1938) Thomas Parkes (1824-1899) Sarah Gearside (1830-1891) 7373
… further results


1418 people lived in 1938

Father Mother
George VI of the United Kingdom (1895-1952) George V of the United Kingdom (1865-1936) Victoria Mary of Teck (1867-1953)
Geertje Aangeenbrug (1871-1947) Pieter Aangeenbrug 1834-1908
Frederika Ahrens (c1866-1940) Heinrich Ahrens (c1815-1891) Sophia Fischer (c1826-1886)
George Ahrens (c1886-1970) Charles Ahrens (c1849-c1935) Elizabeth T Turner (?-?)
Arthur John Albury (1875-1952) John William Albury (1849-1889) Mercy Cause (1852-1912)
Henrietta Albury (1878-1954) Henry Albert Albury (1852-1878) Caroline Allen Unicomb (1857-1952)
Thomas Goldsborough Alford (1873-1940) Stephen Goldsborough Alford (?-c1893) Clarissa Jane Hilliar (?-c1883)
Rosa Algeo (1883-1965) Charles Lockhart Algeo (1857-1943) Fanny Crossingham (1856-1943)
Bertha Marion Allen (1872-1967) Thomas Allen (?-?) Mary Unknown (?-?)
Caroline Allen (1856-1940) Robert Allen (?-?) Mary Unknown (?-?)
Carl David Anderson (1905-1991) Carl David Anderson (1878) Emma Adolfina Ajaxson (1878)
Nellie Anderson (1873-1950) Ander Unknown (c1850-aft1873)
Ethel May Anlezark (1889-1967) Louis Napoleon Anlezark (1863-1951) Elizabeth Susan Baker (c1864-1942)
Minnie Victoria Anlezark (1883-1964) Joseph Wilson Anlezark (1845-c1932) Amanda Jane Thompson (1855-c1933)
Adella May Anthoney (1907-1990) Charles Anthoney (c1867-1955) Esther Louisa Long (1871-1946)
… further results

Events of the year 1938 at Familypedia

9 people were married in 1938.

Joined with
Orville Garfield Lhotka (1915-2001) Evelyn Mabel Marshall (1920-2006)
Evelyn Mabel Marshall (1920-2006) Orville Garfield Lhotka (1915-2001)
Geertruida Oudshoorn (1938-) Jacobus N. Tol (1937-)
Otto Arthur Saidat (1918-2001) Elsie Florence Stadtler
Jacobus N. Tol (1937-) Geertruida Oudshoorn (1938-)
Byron Joseph Woolsey (1911-1996) Anamay Moore Redfern
Kira of Russia (1909-1967) Louis Ferdinand von Preußen (1907-1994)
Louis Ferdinand von Preußen (1907-1994) Kira of Russia (1909-1967)
Paul of Greece (1901-1964) Frederica of Hanover (1917-1981)


There were 0 military battles in 1938.

0.0042313117066291 1.5 0.019746121297602
1938

External links

Table of contents

Contents


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at 1938. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about 1938RDF feed
Birth rate 0.00423  +
Births 6  +
Deaths 28  +
Fertility 1.5  +
Mortality 0.0197  +
People 1,418  +
Year 1,938  +

This article uses material from the "1938" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1900s  1910s  1920s  - 1930s -  1940s  1950s  1960s
Years: 1935 1936 1937 - 1938 - 1939 1940 1941

Contents

Events

Births

Deaths

Films released

Hit songs

  • "Thanks For The Memory" - by Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger, from the movie Big Broadcast 1935, won the Academy Award for the best song.

Nobel Prize








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