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The 1948 Republican National Convention was held at the Municipal Auditorium, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from June 21 to June 25, 1948.

New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey had paved the way to win the Republican presidential nomination in the primaries where he had beaten Minnesota Governor Harold E. Stassen and the victorious World War II General Douglas MacArthur. In Philadelphia he was nominated on the third ballot over the opposition from die-hard conservative Ohio Senator Robert A. Taft, from the future "minister of peace" Harold E. Stassen of Minnesota, Michigan Senator Arthur Vandenberg and California Governor Earl Warren. In all Republican conventions after 1948, the nominee was selected on the first ballot. Warren was nominated for Vice President. Together the Republican ticket of Thomas Dewey and Earl Warren surprisingly went on to lose the general election to the Democratic ticket of Harry S. Truman and Alben W. Barkley.

Contents

The Platform

Candidates before the Convention

The Balloting

The tally:
Ballot 1 2 3
NY Governor Thomas E. Dewey 434 515 1094
OH Senator Robert Taft 224 274 0
Frm. MN Governor Harold Stassen 157 149 0
MI Senator and President pro tem Arthur Vandenberg 62 62 0
CA Governor Earl Warren 59 57 0
House Speaker Joseph Martin 18 10 0
General Douglas MacArthur 11 7 0
Others 127 20 0

Vice-Presidential Nomination

Dewey had a long list of potential running-mates, including Senator John Bricker of Ohio, Congressman Charles Halleck of Indiana, and Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota. Dewey however, chose two-term California Governor Earl Warren as his running-mate, Warren was nominated unopposed.

See also

Preceded by
1944
Chicago, Illinois
Republican National Conventions Succeeded by
1952
Chicago, Illinois
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