1955 World Series: Wikis

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1955 World Series
1955 next year.jpg
Don Hoak (from left), Johnny Podres and Roy Campanella celebrate the Dodgers' World Championship.
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Brooklyn Dodgers (4) Walt Alston 98–55, .641, GA: 13½
New York Yankees (3) Casey Stengel 96–58, .623, GA: 3
Dates: September 28–October 7
MVP: Johnny Podres (Brooklyn)
Television: NBC. This was the first World Series televised in color.
TV announcers: Mel Allen and Vin Scully
Radio: Mutual
Radio announcers: Al Helfer and Bob Neal
Umpires: Bill Summers (AL), Lee Ballanfant (NL), Jim Honochick (AL), Frank Dascoli (NL), Red Flaherty (AL: outfield only), Augie Donatelli (NL: outfield only)
Future Hall of Famers: Dodgers: Walt Alston (mgr.), Roy Campanella, Sandy Koufax (dnp), Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider.
Yankees: Casey Stengel (mgr.), Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle, Phil Rizutto.
 < 1954 World Series 1956 > 

The 1955 World Series matched the Brooklyn Dodgers against the New York Yankees, with the Dodgers winning the Series in seven games to capture their first championship in franchise history. It would be the only Series the Dodgers won in Brooklyn (the team relocated to Los Angeles after the 1957 season). The last time the Brooklyn franchise won a World Championship was in 1900. The team was called the Brooklyn Superbas, the event was called the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup, and the opponent was their fellow National League Pittsburgh Pirates.

This series would also mark the end of a long period of invulnerability for the Yankees in the World Series. It was the Yankees' first loss in a World Series since 1942 and only their second since 1926. While the Yankees were 15-2 in Series Appearances during that time, they would lose again in 1957, 1960, 1963, and 1964, for a record of 4-5 in World Series over the next decade.

The two teams were meeting in a World Series for the fifth time in nine years, with the Yankees having won in 1947, 1949, 1952 and 1953.

Contents

Summary

NL Brooklyn Dodgers (4) vs. AL New York Yankees (3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance
1 September 28 Brooklyn Dodgers – 5, New York Yankees – 6 Yankee Stadium (I) 2:31 63,869[1]
2 September 29 Brooklyn Dodgers – 2, New York Yankees – 4 Yankee Stadium (I) 2:28 64,707[2] 
3 September 30 New York Yankees – 3, Brooklyn Dodgers – 8 Ebbets Field 2:20 34,209[3] 
4 October 1 New York Yankees – 5, Brooklyn Dodgers – 8 Ebbets Field 2:57 36,242[4] 
5 October 2 New York Yankees – 3, Brooklyn Dodgers – 5 Ebbets Field 2:40 36,796[5] 
6 October 3 Brooklyn Dodgers – 1, New York Yankees – 5 Yankee Stadium (I) 2:34 64,022[6] 
7 October 4 Brooklyn Dodgers – 2, New York Yankees – 0 Yankee Stadium (I) 2:44 62,465[7]

Matchups

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Game 1

Wednesday, September 28, 1955 at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 5 10 0
New York 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 X 6 9 1

WP: Whitey Ford (1–0)  LP: Don Newcombe (0–1)  SV: Bob Grim (1)  
HRs:  BRO – Carl Furillo (1), Duke Snider (1)  NYY – Elston Howard (1), Joe Collins 2 (2)

The Yankees took Game 1 behind homers from Joe Collins (2) and one by rookie Elston Howard in his first World Series at bat. Carl Furillo homers for Brooklyn and Duke Snider hits his first of the series, all of which will eventually help establish a new HR record for a seven-game series (17). Jackie Robinson steals home, but Whitey Ford wins with relief help in the ninth from Bob Grim.

Game 2

Thursday, September 29, 1955 at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 5 2
New York 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 X 4 8 0

WP: Tommy Byrne (1–0)  LP: Billy Loes (0–1)  

Tommy Byrne tosses a five-hit complete game victory and singles in New York's final run during the Yank's big four-run fourth inning, putting New York up 2–0.

Game 3

Friday, September 30, 1955 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 0
Brooklyn 2 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 X 8 11 1

WP: Johnny Podres (1–0)  LP: Bob Turley (0–1)  
HRs:  NYY – Mickey Mantle (1)  BRO – Roy Campanella (1)

Johnny Podres goes all the way and wins with home run help from Roy Campanella. A limping Mickey Mantle hits his only home run of the series. As of 2009, this is the last World Series game to take place in September.

Game 4

Saturday, October 1, 1955 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 5 9 0
Brooklyn 0 0 1 3 3 0 1 0 X 8 14 0

WP: Clem Labine (1–0)  LP: Don Larsen (0–1)  
HRs:  NYY – Gil McDougald (1)  BRO – Roy Campanella (2), Gil Hodges (1), Duke Snider (2)

Brooklyn evens the series at 2–2 as Roy Campanella, Gil Hodges and Duke Snider all hit home runs.

Game 5

Sunday, October 2, 1955 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 6 0
Brooklyn 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 X 5 9 2

WP: Roger Craig (1–0)  LP: Bob Grim (0–1)  SV: Clem Labine (1)  
HRs:  NYY – Bob Cerv (1), Yogi Berra (1)  BRO – Sandy Amoros (1), Duke Snider 2 (4)

Duke Snider hits two home runs (four in the series) and Sandy Amoros helps the Dodgers beat the Yankees for the third straight day. Dodgers rookie Roger Craig wins in his first World Series start. Bob Cerv and Yogi Berra hit Yankee homers off Craig and reliever Clem Labine.

Snider became the only player from either league with four home runs in two different Series.

Game 6

Monday, October 3, 1955 at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1
New York 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 5 8 0

WP: Whitey Ford (2–0)  LP: Karl Spooner (0–1)  
HRs:  NYY – Bill Skowron (1)

Whitey Ford holds the Dodgers to four hits and a single run while striking out eight as the Yankees even the series even at 3–3. New York scored all five runs in the first inning, led by Bill Skowron's three-run blast.

Game 7

Tuesday, October 4, 1955 at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 0
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1

WP: Johnny Podres (2–0)  LP: Tommy Byrne (1–1)  

The Dodgers scored one run in the fourth and sixth innings on a single and sac fly, both by Gil Hodges.

With runners on first and second and one out, Left fielder Sandy Amorós made a dramatic game-saving catch of a deep fly ball down the left field line off the bat of Yogi Berra in the sixth inning of Game 7, to start a double play (as Amoros threw to Pee Wee Reese to Gil Hodges, who tagged Yankee Gil McDougald before making it back to first.) and stymie the Yankees' best chance of the day. Amorós, who was left-handed; that is, he wore his glove on his right hand, closest to the left-field foul line, had just been inserted in left field for Jim Gilliam. Assuming the right-handed Gilliam had been in the same position as Amorós, it is doubtful that he would have made the catch. Amorós' glove and the ball seemed to meet at the same place at the same time; Gilliam, who wore his glove on his left hand, would have had to extend his glove across his body, likely throwing off his timing to make the play.

Elston Howard grounded out to Reese for the final out; the two share the dubious record for playing in the most losing World Series (six each).

This would be the only World Series game Jackie Robinson did not play in during his career. Don Hoak played third base in place of Robinson.

For the first time in Series history, an MVP was selected - Johnny Podres (winning Games 3 and 7). He was 2–0, with two complete games and an ERA of 1.00, Game 7 was a shutout.

Composite box

1955 World Series (4–3): Brooklyn Dodgers (N.L.) over New York Yankees (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn Dodgers 2 6 3 8 5 1 3 3 0 31 58 6
New York Yankees 6 5 1 7 0 4 2 1 0 26 55 2
Total attendance: 362,310   Average attendance: 51,759
Winning player’s share: $9,768   Losing player’s share: $5,599[8]

Series quotes

Ladies and gentlemen, the Brooklyn Dodgers are the champions of the world.
Vin Scully's simple announcement of the result after the last out.
In Brooklyn that day, it was the Liberation of Paris, Vee Jay Day, New Years Day all rolled into one.
Author Pete Hamill on Brooklyn the day the Dodgers won.

Notes

References

  • Neft, David S., and Richard M. Cohen. The World Series. 1st ed. New York: St Martins, 1990. (Neft and Cohen 254–258)
  • Reichler, Joseph, ed. (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.), p. 2163. MacMillian Publishing. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.
  • Forman, Sean L.. "1955 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Information.. http://www.baseball-reference.com/postseason/1955_WS.shtml. Retrieved 2007-12-09.  

External links


Simple English

The 1955 World Series was played between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees. The Dodgers won the Series in seven games. This was their first championship in team history. It would be the only Series the Dodgers won in Brooklyn. The team moved to Los Angeles after the 1957 season. The last time the Brooklyn team won a World Championship was in 1900. The team was called the Brooklyn Superbas. The series was called the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup. Their opponent then was fellow National League competitor Pittsburgh Pirates.

This series would also end a long period of success for the Yankees in the World Series. It was the Yankees' first loss in a World Series since 1942. It was only their second loss since 1926. The Yankees were 15-2 in the series during that time. They would lose again in 1957, 1960, 1963, and 1964. The Yankees would have a record of 4-5 in World Series over the next decade.

The two teams were meeting in a World Series for the fifth time in nine years. The Yankees had won in 1947, 1949, 1952 and 1953.



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