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1966 St. Louis Cardinals season: Wikis

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1966 St. Louis Cardinals
Major league affiliations
Location
1966 Information
Owner(s) August "Gussie" Busch
Manager(s) Red Schoendienst
Local television KSD-TV
Local radio KMOX
(Harry Caray, Jack Buck, Jerry Gross)
Stats ESPN.com

BB-reference

The St. Louis Cardinals 1966 season was the team's 85th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 75th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 83-79 during the season and finished sixth in the National League, 12 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

This season marked the final time the Cardinals played in Sportsman's Park/Busch Stadium I, as they played their final home game at that ballpark on May 8, losing to the San Francisco Giants, 10-5. The Cardinals moved into Busch Memorial Stadium four days later, and defeated the Atlanta Braves, 4-3 in 12 innings. On July 12, the Cardinals hosted the 1966 MLB All-Star Game at their new stadium, in 105 degree heat and humidity, with the NL defeating the AL, 2-1 in ten innings. Busch Memorial Stadium was where the Cardinals would play baseball until the end of 2005.

Pitcher Bob Gibson and outfielder Curt Flood won Gold Gloves this year.

Contents

Offseason

Regular season

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Season standings

National League W L GB Pct.
Los Angeles Dodgers 95 67 -- .586
San Francisco Giants 93 68 1.5 .578
Pittsburgh Pirates 92 70 3 .568
Philadelphia Phillies 87 75 8 .537
Atlanta Braves 85 77 10 .525
St. Louis Cardinals 83 79 12 .512
Cincinnati Reds 76 84 18 .475
Houston Astros 72 90 23 .444
New York Mets 66 95 28.5 .410
Chicago Cubs 59 103 36 .364

Notable transactions

Roster

1966 St. Louis Cardinals roster
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Gibson, BobBob Gibson 35 280.1 21 12 2.44 225

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO

Awards and records

  • Tim McCarver, National League leader, Triples, (13). McCarver became the second catcher in the history of the National League to lead the league in triples.[7]

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Tulsa Oilers Pacific Coast League Charlie Metro
AA Arkansas Travelers Texas League Vern Rapp
A St. Petersburg Cardinals Florida State League Sparky Anderson
A Cedar Rapids Cardinals Midwest League Ron Plaza
A Rock Hill Cardinals Western Carolinas League Jack Krol
Short-Season A Eugene Emeralds Northwest League Hugh Luby
Rookie GCL Cardinals Gulf Coast League George Kissell

Eugene affiliation shared with Philadelphia Phillies[8]

Notes

  1. ^ Charley Smith page at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ Dick Groat page at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Nate Colbert page at Baseball Reference
  4. ^ Jimy Williams page at Baseball Reference
  5. ^ a b Willie Montañez page at Baseball Reference
  6. ^ Orlando Cepeda page at Baseball Reference
  7. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.96, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, NY, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  8. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References


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