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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1970 Pacific typhoon season

Season summary map
First storm formed: February 19, 1970
Last storm dissipated: November 29, 1970
Strongest storm: Hope – 889 hPa (mbar),
Total storms: 24
Typhoons: 12
Super typhoons: 7
Total fatalities: Unknown
Total damage: Unknown
Pacific typhoon seasons
1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972

The 1970 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1970, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1970 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

Contents

Storms

27 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. 12 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 7 reached super typhoon strength.

Typhoon Nancy (Atang)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Super Typhoon Olga

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Super Typhoon Olga, the first of the season, moved northeastward after its peak of 160 mph on July 1. Dry air approached the system as it neared Japan, and Olga struck the country on the 5th as a 60 mph tropical storm. Olga brought heavy rains and mudslides to the area, causing 8 deaths in Japan, 29 casualties in South Korea, and $10 million in damage (1970 USD).

Tropical Storm Pamela

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Ruby (Emang)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Sally

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Therese

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Violet (Heling)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Typhoon Wilda (Iliang)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

A broad surface trough developed into Tropical Storm Wilda on August 9. After drifting to the west-southwest, it turned to the north, where it reached a peak of 120 mph winds on the 12th near Okinawa. Wilda continued northward, and weakened slightly to a 105 mph typhoon before making landfall on western Kyūshū on the 14th. Wilda accelerated to the northeast, and became extratropical on the 15th. The typhoon caused heavy rain, killing 11 people.

Super Typhoon Anita

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

An upper level low contributed to the formation of Tropical Depression 11W on August 16 over the northern Marianas Islands. It quickly intensified, reaching typhoon status that night. Anita's intensification rate slowed initially, but as it continued northwestward late on the 18th and 19th, Anita rapidly strengthened to a 155 mph super typhoon. It weakened as it accelerated to the north-northwest, and hit western Shikoku in Japan on the 21st as a 115 mph typhoon. Anita, which became extratropical on the 22nd, caused 23 deaths and sank 31 vessels.

Typhoon Billie

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Typhoon Clara

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Clara developed on August 26 southeast of Japan from an upper tropospheric circulation that separated from the Mid-Pacific trough. It quickly strengthened, and became a typhoon on the 27th at 31.9º North, one of only 16 Western Pacific typhoons to reach that strength north of 30º. Clara peaked at 95 mph before coming close to Japan, when a shortwave trough forced it sharply eastward. The storm maintained its intensity until becoming extratropical on September 3. An interesting fact about Clara was a reconnaissance mission flown into Hurricane Dot in the central Pacific also flew into Clara on the same flight, an unusual accomplishment not normally seen.

Tropical Storm Ellen

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Fran

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Super Typhoon Georgia (Pitang)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

On September 11, Super Typhoon Georgia, which formed on the 8th, struck northern Luzon with winds of 160 mph. It weakened over the island, turned to the northwest, and hit southern China as a strong tropical storm on the 13th. Georgia produced little rain over the Philippines, but its strong winds caused 95 casualties (with 80 missing) and damage at $1.4 million (1970 USD).

Super Typhoon Hope

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Typhoon Iris

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Super Typhoon Joan (Sening)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

A tropical disturbance organized into Tropical Storm Joan on October 9, east of the Philippines. Conditions favored strengthening, and Joan reached typhoon status on the 11th. From late on the 11th to early on the 13th, Typhoon Joan rapidly intensified to a 175 mph Super Typhoon. It struck the southeastern Luzon at that intensity on the 13th, and crossed the archipelago. After weakening to a minimal typhoon, Joan turned to the northwest, where it reintensified to a 115 mph typhoon. It made landfall on eastern Hainan Island on the 16th, and dissipated on the 18th over China. Joan left 575 people dead (with 193 missing), and caused $74 million in damage (1970 USD), mostly from agricultural losses.

Super Typhoon Kate (Titang)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Kate developed just behind Typhoon Joan, east of the southern Philippines on October 14. It tracked westward as a small cyclone, and strengthened into a typhoon on the 15th. It made landfall twice, once in the Philippines and once in Vietnam, resulting in at least 631 fatalities (with 284 missing) and $50 million in damage.

Tropical Storm Louise

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Marge

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Tropical Storm Nora

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

The remnants of Tropical Storm Nora caused the 1970 Bhola cyclone to form and devastate Bangladesh.

Tropical Storm Opal

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

Super Typhoon Patsy (Yoling)

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

A tropical disturbance organized into Tropical Depression 27W on November 14 near the Marianas Islands. A strong ridge to its north forced it westward, where it strengthened to tropical storm status later on the 14th. Patsy steadily intensified, reaching typhoon strength on the 16th and peaking at 155 mph on the 18th. Its inflow became disrupted by the Philippines to its west, and Patsy hit Luzon on the 19th with winds of 130 mph, making it the 3rd strong typhoon since September to strike the island. After crossing the island, Patsy traversed the South China Sea, where cooler waters kept the system a tropical storm. On November 22, Patsy struck Vietnam, and dissipated soon after. Typhoon Patsy was one of the deadliest typhoons to strike the Philippines in its history. 106 people were killed (with 351 missing) on the island, and 135 people were killed at sea due to shipping failures. Because the Vietnam War was raging at that time, its difficult to say about the damage or death toll, but estimates say that 30 people died in Vietnam.

Tropical Storm Ruth

Counterclockwise vortex
Duration Unknown – Unknown
Intensity Winds unknown

1970 storm names

Western North Pacific tropical cyclones were named by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The first storm of 1970 was named Nancy and the final one was named Ruth.

  • Agnes
  • Bonnie
  • Carmen
  • Della
  • Elaine
  • Faye
  • Gloria
  • Hester
  • Irma
  • Judy
  • Kit
  • Lola
  • Mamie
  • Nina
  • Ora
  • Phyllis
  • Rita
  • Susan
  • Tess
  • Viola
  • Winnie
  • Alice
  • Betty
  • Cora
  • Doris
  • Elsie
  • Flossie
  • Grace
  • Helen
  • Ida
  • June
  • Kathy
  • Lorna
  • Marie
  • Nancy 1W
  • Olga 2W
  • Pamela 3W
  • Ruby 4W
  • Sally 5W
  • Therese 8W
  • Violet 9W
  • Wilda 10W
  • Anita 11W
  • Billie 12W
  • Clara 13W
  • Dot 14C
  • Ellen 15W
  • Fran 16W
  • Georgia 17W
  • Hope 18W
  • Iris 19W
  • Joan 21W
  • Kate 22W
  • Louise 23W
  • Marge 24W
  • Nora 25W
  • Opal 26W
  • Patsy 27W
  • Ruth 28W
  • Sarah
  • Thelma
  • Vera
  • Wanda
  • Amy
  • Babe
  • Carla
  • Dinah
  • Emma
  • Freda
  • Gilda
  • Harriet
  • Ivy
  • Jean
  • Kim
  • Lucy
  • Mary
  • Nadine
  • Olive
  • Polly
  • Rose
  • Shirley
  • Trix
  • Virginia
  • Wendy

One Central Pacific System developed, Hurricane Dot. The policy at that time was to use Western Pacific Names for the Central Pacific.

References

External links








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