The Full Wiki

1980 Winter Olympic Games: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to 1980 Winter Olympics article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

XIII Olympic Winter Games
XIII Olympic Winter Games

The emblem is a line that forms the Adirondacks,
which turns into a column on the left,
paying tribute the ancient Olympic games.
On the top of the column it is serrated
to hold the Olympic rings. This represents
a double cauldron, acknowledging that
the Olympics were also held in Lake Placid in 1932.
Host city Lake Placid, New York, USA
Nations participating 37
Athletes participating 1072
(840 men, 232 women)
Events 38 in 6 sports
Opening ceremony February 14
Closing ceremony February 23
Officially opened by Vice President Walter Mondale
Athlete's Oath Eric Heiden
Judge's Oath Terry McDermott
Olympic Torch Dr.Charles Morgan Kerr
Stadium Lake Placid Equestrian Stadium

The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were a winter multi-sport event which was celebrated in February 13 through February 24, 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. This was the second time the upstate New York village hosted the Games, after 1932. The only other candidate city to bid for the Games was Vancouver-Garibaldi, British Columbia, Canada; they withdrew before the final vote.

The mascots of the Games were "Roni" and "Ronny", the raccoon. The natural mask on a raccoon recalls the goggles and hats worn by many athletes in winter sports.

Contents

Highlights

  • An upstart United States ice hockey team, made up mostly of collegiate players, won the gold medal, defeating the heavily favored Soviet team and Finland in the medal round. Their 4–3 defeat of the Soviet team, which came into the '80 Games having won 4 consecutive Olympic gold medals, became known as the "Miracle on Ice" in the US press. The win captured the hearts of Americans during a time of Cold War tensions, even though it was the win against Finland that captured the gold medal. A film about the event, called Miracle, was released in 2004.
  • Lake Placid 1980 marked the first use of artificial snow in Olympic competition.
  • Although they did not get any medals, the People's Republic of China entered the Olympics Games for the first time after the IOC agreed to designate the Republic of China "Chinese Taipei".
  • Sweden's Ingemar Stenmark won both the giant slalom and the slalom.
  • Hanni Wenzel won the women's giant slalom and slalom, making Liechtenstein the smallest country to produce an Olympic champion.
  • Ulrich Wehling of East Germany and Irina Rodnina of the USSR won their respective events for the third time.
  • Aleksandr Tikhonov of the USSR earned his fourth straight gold medal.
  • Nikolay Zimyatov of the USSR earned three gold medals in cross-country skiing.
  • Eric Heiden won 5 gold medals in speedskating (500m, 1,000m, 1,500m, 5,000m and 10,000m), setting 4 Olympic records and 1 world record (10,000m) in the process. Heiden was the first to win 5 individual gold medals at one Games.
  • Robin Cousins won gold for Great Britain in the men's ice skating
  • East Germany won the most medals overall (23) but had fewer golds (9) than the USSR (10).
  • In possibly the most dramatic duel of the games, Sweden's Thomas Wassberg edged Finland's Juha Mieto in the 15 km cross-country skiing by 0.01 seconds, the closest margin of victory ever in Olympic cross-country skiing. This led the International Ski Federation (FIS) to time all events to the nearest 1/10th second in the future.

Medals awarded

The Olympic cauldron

See the medal winners, ordered by sport:

Venues

Critics decried poorly planned transportation which left spectators waiting for hours in freezing weather, and some athletes complained about lousy accommodations at the Olympic village, where the dorms would later be turned into a prison. The supply and demand for event tickets never merged, as would-be buyers were unable to buy unsold tickets because only those who already had a ticket could enter ticket-sales areas at venues.[1] Unsold tickets are still being sold as souvenirs at several local tourist shops, including the Olympic Regional Development Association's gift shop at the Olympic Arena.

Medal count

(Host nation highlighted)

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Soviet Union 10 6 6 22
2  East Germany (GDR) 9 7 7 23
3 United States 6 4 2 12
4 Austria 3 2 2 7
5 Sweden 3 0 1 4
6 Liechtenstein 2 2 0 4
7 Finland 1 5 3 9
8 Norway 1 3 6 10
9 Netherlands 1 2 1 4
10 Switzerland 1 1 3 5

Participating nations

36 NOCs participated. United States President Jimmy Carter had already called for the boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, leading to a great deal of tension at the Games. Nevertheless, the USSR and its allies participated.

Three NOCs made their Olympic debut at the 1980 Winter Olympics: the People's Republic of China, Costa Rica, and Cyprus. The Republic of China boycotted the Games over the IOC's recognition of the PRC as "China", and its request for the Republic of China to compete as "Chinese Taipei".[2]

Theme song

The official theme song for the 1980 Winter Olympics was "Give It All You Got" by the American flugelhorn player Chuck Mangione, who performed the song live at the Closing Ceremonies.[3]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Winter Sports 2002
  2. ^ Kiat.net
  3. ^ Hyatt, Wesley (1999). The Billboard Book of #1 Adult Contemporary Hits (Billboard Publications)

External links

Preceded by
Denver/Innsbruck
Winter Olympics
Lake Placid

XIII Olympic Winter Games (1980)
Succeeded by
Sarajevo
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message