1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament: Wikis

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1983 NCAA Men's Division I
Basketball Tournament
Teams 52
Finals Site The Pit
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Champions NC State (2nd title)
Runner-Up Houston (1st title game)
Semifinalists Georgia (1st Final Four)
Louisville (6th Final Four)
Winning Coach Jim Valvano (1st title)
MOP Hakeem Olajuwon Houston
Attendance 364,356
Top scorer Dereck Whittenburg NC State
(120 points)
NCAA Men's Division I Tournaments
«1982  1984»

The 1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 52 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 2, 1983, and ended with the championship game on April 4 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A total of 51 games were played.

North Carolina State, coached by Jim Valvano, won the national title with a 54-52 victory in the final game over Houston, coached by Guy Lewis. The ending of the final is one of the most famous in college basketball history, with Lorenzo Charles' dunk at the buzzer off a high, arching air ball from 30 feet out by Dereck Whittenburg providing the final margin. This contributed to the nickname given to North Carolina State, the "Cardiac Pack", a reference to their often close games that came down to the wire — in fact, the team won 7 of its last 9 games after trailing with a minute left in the game. Both Charles' dunk and Valvano's running around the court in celebration immediately after the game have been staples of NCAA tournament coverage ever since. North Carolina State's victory has often been considered one of the greatest upsets in college basketball history.

Hakeem Olajuwon of Houston was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player, becoming the last player to date to earn this award while playing for a team that failed to win the national title.

Contents

Locations

Region Site Other Locations
East Syracuse, New York Greensboro, North Carolina, Hartford, Connecticut, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Mideast Knoxville, Tennessee Dayton, Ohio, Evansville, Indiana, Tampa, Florida
Midwest Kansas City, Missouri Dayton, Ohio, Houston, Texas, Louisville, Kentucky
West Ogden, Utah Boise, Idaho, Corvallis, Oregon, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Finals Albuquerque, New Mexico

Teams

Region Seed Team Coach Finished Final Opponent Score
East
East 1 St. John's Lou Carnesecca Sweet Sixteen 4 Georgia L 70-67
East 2 North Carolina Dean Smith Elite Eight 4 Georgia L 82-77
East 3 Ohio State Eldon Miller Sweet Sixteen 2 North Carolina L 64-51
East 4 Georgia Hugh Durham National Semifinals 6 North Carolina State L 67-60
East 5 Virginia Commonwealth J.D. Barnett Round of 32 4 Georgia L 56-54
East 6 Syracuse Jim Boeheim Round of 32 3 Ohio State L 79-74
East 7 West Virginia Gale Catlett Round of 64 10 James Madison L 57-50
East 8 Southwestern Louisiana Bobby Paschal Round of 64 9 Rutgers L 60-53
East 9 Rutgers Tom Young Round of 32 1 St. John's L 66-55
East 10 James Madison Lou Campanelli Round of 32 2 North Carolina L 68-49
East 11 Morehead State Wayne Martin Round of 64 6 Syracuse L 74-59
East 12 Boston University Rick Pitino Preliminary Round 12 La Salle L 70-58
East 12 La Salle Lefty Ervin Round of 64 5 Virginia Commonwealth L 76-67
Mideast
Mideast 1 Louisville Denny Crum National Semifinals 1 Houston L 94-81
Mideast 2 Indiana Bob Knight Sweet Sixteen 3 Kentucky L 64-59
Mideast 3 Kentucky Joe B. Hall Elite Eight 1 Louisville L 80-68
Mideast 4 Arkansas Eddie Sutton Sweet Sixteen 1 Louisville L 65-63
Mideast 5 Purdue Gene Keady Round of 32 4 Arkansas L 78-68
Mideast 6 Illinois State Bob Donewald Round of 64 11 Ohio L 51-49
Mideast 7 Oklahoma Billy Tubbs Round of 32 2 Indiana L 63-49
Mideast 8 Tennessee Don DeVoe Round of 32 1 Louisville L 70-57
Mideast 9 Marquette Hank Raymonds Round of 64 8 Tennessee L 57-56
Mideast 10 UAB Gene Bartow Round of 64 7 Oklahoma L 71-63
Mideast 11 Ohio Danny Nee Round of 32 3 Kentucky L 57-40
Mideast 12 Georgia Southern Frank Kerns Preliminary Round 12 Robert Morris L 64-54
Mideast 12 Robert Morris Matt Furjanic Round of 64 5 Purdue L 55-53
Midwest
Midwest 1 Houston Guy Lewis Runner Up 6 North Carolina State L 54-52
Midwest 2 Missouri Norm Stewart Round of 32 7 Iowa L 77-63
Midwest 3 Villanova Rollie Massimino Elite Eight 1 Houston L 89-71
Midwest 4 Memphis State Dana Kirk Sweet Sixteen 1 Houston L 70-63
Midwest 5 Georgetown John Thompson Round of 32 4 Memphis State L 66-57
Midwest 6 Alabama Wimp Sanderson Round of 64 11 Lamar L 73-50
Midwest 7 Iowa Lute Olson Sweet Sixteen 3 Villanova L 55-54
Midwest 8 Maryland Lefty Driesell Round of 32 1 Houston L 60-50
Midwest 9 Tennessee-Chattanooga Murray Arnold Round of 64 8 Maryland L 52-51
Midwest 10 Utah State Rod Tueller Round of 64 7 Iowa L 64-59
Midwest 11 Lamar Pat Foster Round of 32 3 Villanova L 60-58
Midwest 12 Alcorn State Davey Whitney Round of 64 5 Georgetown L 68-63
Midwest 12 Xavier Bob Staak Preliminary Round 12 Alcorn State L 81-75
West
West 1 Virginia Terry Holland Elite Eight 6 North Carolina State L 63-62
West 2 UCLA Larry Farmer Round of 32 10 Utah L 67-61
West 3 UNLV Jerry Tarkanian Round of 32 6 North Carolina State L 71-70
West 4 Boston College Gary Williams Sweet Sixteen 1 Virginia L 95-92
West 5 Oklahoma State Paul Hansen Round of 64 12 Princeton L 56-53
West 6 North Carolina State Jim Valvano Champion 1 Houston W 54-52
West 7 Illinois Lou Henson Round of 64 10 Utah L 52-49
West 8 Washington State George Raveling Round of 32 1 Virginia L 54-49
West 9 Weber State Neil McCarthy Round of 64 8 Washington State L 62-52
West 10 Utah Jerry Pimm Sweet Sixteen 6 North Carolina State L 75-56
West 11 Pepperdine Jim Harrick Round of 64 6 North Carolina State L 69-67
West 12 North Carolina A&T Don Corbett Preliminary Round 12 Princeton L 53-41
West 12 Princeton Pete Carril Round of 32 4 Boston College L 51-42

Bracket

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East region

  First round Second round Sweet Sixteen Elite Eight
                                     
8  Southwest Louisiana 53  
9  Rutgers 60  
  9  Rutgers 55  
    1  St. John's 66  
      
        
  1  St. John's 67  
  4  Georgia 70  
        
        
  4  Georgia 56
    5  Virginia Commonwealth 54  
5  Virginia Commonwealth 76
12  La Salle 67  
  4  Georgia 82
  2  North Carolina 77
6  Syracuse 74  
11  Morehead State 59  
  6  Syracuse 74
    3  Ohio State 79  
      
        
  3  Ohio State 51
  2  North Carolina 64  
        
        
  2  North Carolina 68
    10  James Madison 49  
7  West Virginia 50
10  James Madison 57  

West region

  First round Second round Sweet Sixteen Elite Eight
                                     
8  Washington State 62  
9  Weber State 52  
  8  Washington State 49  
    1  Virginia 54  
      
        
  1  Virginia 95  
  4  Boston College 92  
        
        
  4  Boston College 51
    12  Princeton 42  
5  Oklahoma State 53
12  Princeton 56  
  1  Virginia 62
  6  North Carolina State 63
6  North Carolina State 69  
11  Pepperdine 67  
  6  North Carolina State 71
    3  UNLV 70  
      
        
  6  North Carolina State 75
  10  Utah 56  
        
        
  2  UCLA 61
    10  Utah 67  
7  Illinois 49
10  Utah 52  

Mideast region

  First round Second round Sweet Sixteen Elite Eight
                                     
8  Tennessee 57  
9  Marquette 56  
  8  Tennessee 57  
    1  Louisville 70  
      
        
  1  Louisville 65  
  4  Arkansas 63  
        
        
  4  Arkansas 78
    5  Purdue 68  
5  Purdue 55
12  Robert Morris 53  
  1  Louisville 80
  3  Kentucky 68
6  Illinois State 49  
11  Ohio 51  
  11  Ohio 40
    3  Kentucky 57  
      
        
  3  Kentucky 64
  2  Indiana 59  
        
        
  2  Indiana 63
    7  Oklahoma 49  
7  Oklahoma 71
10  UAB 63  

Midwest region

  First round Second round Sweet Sixteen Elite Eight
                                     
8  Maryland 52  
9  Tennessee-Chattanooga 51  
  8  Maryland 50  
    1  Houston 60  
      
        
  1  Houston 70  
  4  Memphis State 63  
        
        
  4  Memphis State 66
    5  Georgetown 57  
5  Georgetown 68
12  Alcorn State 63  
  1  Houston 89
  3  Villanova 71
6  Alabama 50  
11  Lamar 73  
  11  Lamar 58
    3  Villanova 60  
      
        
  3  Villanova 55
  7  Iowa 54  
        
        
  2  Missouri 63
    7  Iowa 77  
7  Iowa 64
10  Utah State 59  

Final Four

  National Semifinals National Championship Game
                 
E4  Georgia 60  
W6  North Carolina State 67  
    W6  North Carolina State 54
  MW1  Houston 52
ME1  Louisville 81
MW1  Houston 94  

Tournament notes

The Louisville vs Houston semi-final was a matchup of the #1 vs. #2 team.[1] The #1 ranked Houston Cougars (nicknamed Phi Slama Jama) vs. #2 the Louisville Cardinals (nicknamed "The Doctors of Dunk") was considered likely to produce the national champion. It featured two strong offensive teams that specialized in the slam dunk.[2] Both teams put on a show of offense, with Houston winning out over Louisville 94-81. This would have been the biggest game of the tournament had it not been eclipsed by the North Carolina State win over Houston in the championship game.

Another historically significant game in this tournament was the Mideast Regional final between Kentucky and Louisville, in-state rivals that had not played one another in basketball since the 1959 NCAA tournament, and had not played in the regular season since 1922. After regulation time ended with Kentucky tying the game at the buzzer, Louisville dominated the overtime to advance to the Final Four. This result directly led to the start of the Battle for the Bluegrass annual basketball series between the two schools that November.[2]

A historically significant run in the tournament was that of Georgia, who became the last team to date to advance to the Final Four in its first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance. But the North Carolina State team led by Jim Valvano became the archetype of the "Cinderella team", the underdog that many fans look to as a possible spoiler over top-ranked teams. This label has, since then, been applied to many programs, including Gonzaga, Saint Joseph's and George Mason. Not only did North Carolina State beat Houston to win the championship, but they also beat West #1 Virginia to advance to the Final Four.

External links

References

  1. ^ Johnson, Gary K.; Gary K. Johnson, Associate Director of Statistics, Sean W. Straziscar, Associate Director of Statistics, Jeff Williams, Assistant Director of Statistics, Kevin Buerge, Statistics Assistant (2007). Official 2007 NCAA Men's Basketball Records Book. NCAA Records Books. National Collegiate Athletic Association. ISSN 1089-5280. http://www.ncaa.org. 
  2. ^ a b Weintraub, Robert - Jamfest for the Ages. E-Ticket - ESPN.COM the magazine, March 29, 2007

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