The Full Wiki

1984: Wikis

  
  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on 1984

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century20th century21st century
Decades: 1950s  1960s  1970s  – 1980s –  1990s  2000s  2010s
Years: 1981 1982 198319841985 1986 1987
1984 by topic
Subject: ArchaeologyArchitectureArtAviationFilmHome videoLiterature (Poetry) – MeteorologyMusic (Country, Metal) – Rail transportRadioScienceSpaceflightSportsTelevisionVideo gaming
Countries: AustraliaCanada – Ecuador – France – Germany – IndiaIreland – Italy – LuxembourgMalaysiaNew ZealandNorwayPakistan – Philippines – SingaporeSouth Africa– Soviet Union – UKUSAZimbabwe
Leaders: Sovereign statesState leadersReligious leadersLaw
Categories: BirthsDeathsWorksIntroductionsEstablishmentsDisestablishmentsAwards

1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year that started on a Sunday, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar.

Contents

  1. Events of 1984
    Jan. · Feb. · March · April ·
    May · June · July · Aug. ·
    Sept. · Oct. · Nov. · Dec. ·
    Undated · Ongoing
  2. Births
  3. Deaths
  4. Nobel Prizes
  5. See also · Notes · External links

Events of 1984

January

January
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31

February

February
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29

March

March
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31

April

April
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30

May

May
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31

June

June
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30

July

July
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31
Newspaper vending machine featuring news of the 1984 Summer Olympics, which opened on July 28.

August

August
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31
The launch of Shuttle Discovery on STS-41-D, its first mission.

September

September
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October

October
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31

November

November
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30

December

December
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31

Undated

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Ship events

Nobel Prizes

Templeton Prize

In fiction

Notes

  1. ^ [1]

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Nineteen Eighty-Four article)

From Wikiquote

BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU

Nineteen Eighty-Four is a dystopian novel by the English writer George Orwell, published in 1949. The story, which focuses on the life of Winston Smith, was Orwell's vision of a totalitarian state which has absolute control over every action and thought of its people through propaganda, secrecy, constant surveillance, and harsh punishment. In some editions it is retitled 1984.

Contents

Part One

Spoiler warning: Plot, ending, or solution details follow.

Chapter 1

The horrible thing about the Two Minutes Hate was not that one was obliged to act a part, but that it was impossible to avoid joining in. Within thirty seconds any pretence was always unnecessary.
  • It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.
  • DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER
  • The Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education and the fine arts. The Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war. The Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order. And the Ministry of Plenty, which was responsible for economic affairs.
  • The horrible thing about the Two Minutes Hate was not that one was obliged to act a part, but that it was impossible to avoid joining in. Within thirty seconds any pretence was always unnecessary. A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledge hammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, screaming lunatic. And yet the rage that one felt was an abstract, undirected emotion which could be switched from one object to another like the flame of a blowlamp.
  • Then the face of Big Brother faded away again and instead the three slogans of the Party stood out in bold capitals:
    WAR IS PEACE
    FREEDOM IS SLAVERY
    IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH
  • Whether he went on with the diary, or whether he did not go on with it, made no difference. The Thought Police would get him just the same. He had committed— would still have committed, even if he had never set pen to paper— the essential crime that contained all others in itself. Thoughtcrime, they called it. Thoughtcrime was not a thing that could be concealed forever.

Chapter 2

Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimetres inside your skull.
  • To the future or to the past, to a time when thought is free, when men are different from one another and do not live alone — to a time when truth exists and what is done cannot be undone: From the age of uniformity, from the age of solitude, from the age of Big Brother, from the age of doublethink — greetings!
  • Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimetres inside your skull.

Chapter 3

  • Tragedy, he perceived, belonged to the ancient time.
  • If all records told the same tale — then the lie passed into history and became truth.
  • He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.

Chapter 4

Chapter 7

If there is hope... it lies in the proles.
  • If there is hope... it lies in the proles.
  • Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.
  • He wondered, as he had many times wondered before, whether he himself was a lunatic. Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one.

Part Two

Chapter 5

  • The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep people frightened."
  • "You're only a rebel from the waist downwards," he told her.

Chapter 7

  • "Confession is not betrayal. What you say or do doesn't matter: only feelings matter. If they could make me stop loving you—that would be the real betrayal."
    She thought it over. "They can't do that," she said finally. "It's the one thing they can't do. They can't make you believe it. They can't get inside you."
    "No," he said a little more hopefully, "no; that's quite true. They can't get inside you. If you can feel that staying human is worth while, even when it can't have any result whatever, you've beaten them."

Chapter 9

All rulers in all ages have tried to impose a false view of the world upon their followers.
  • The empirical method of thought, on which all the scientific achievements of the past were founded, is opposed to the most fundamental principles of Ingsoc.
  • There was truth and there was untruth, and if you clung to the truth even against the whole world, you were not mad.
  • The book fascinated him, or more exactly it reassured him. In a sense it told him nothing that was new, but that was part of the attraction. It said what he would have said, if it had been possible for him to set his scattered thoughts in order. It was the product of a mind similar to his own, but enormously more powerful, more systematic, less fear-ridden. The best books, he perceived, are those that tell you what you know already.
  • All rulers in all ages have tried to impose a false view of the world upon their followers.
  • War was a sure safeguard of sanity, and so far as the ruling classes were concerned it was probably the most important of all safeguards. While wars could be won or lost, no ruling class could be completely irresponsible.
  • Sanity is not statistical.
  • The Ministry of Peace concerns itself with war, the Ministry of Truth with lies, the Ministry of Love with torture, and the Ministry of Plenty with starvation.

Part Three

Chapter 2

  • I tell you Winston, that reality is not external. Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else. Not in the individual mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the mind of the party, which is collective and immortal. Whatever the party holds to be truth, is truth. It is impossible to see reality except by looking through the eyes of the Party.
  • "How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and two are four."
    "Sometimes, Winston. Sometimes they are five. Sometimes they are three. Sometimes they are all of them at once. You must try harder. It is not easy to become sane."
  • We do not destroy the heretic because he resists us: so long as he resists us we never destroy him. We convert him, we capture his inner mind, we reshape him. We burn all evil and all illusion out of him; we bring him over to our side, not in appearance, but genuinely, heart and soul. We make him one of ourselves before we kill him. [...] we make the brain perfect before we blow it out.
  • The command of the old despotisms was Thou shalt not. The command of the totalitarians was Thou shalt. Our command is Thou art.
  • Never again will you be capable of ordinary human feeling. Everything will be dead inside you. Never again will you be capable of love, or friendship, or joy of living, or laughter, or curiosity, or courage, or integrity. You will be hollow. We shall squeeze you empty and then we shall fill you with ourselves.

Chapter 3

  • The Party seeks power entirely for its own sake. We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power. Not wealth or luxury or long life or happiness: only power, pure power. What pure power means you will understand presently. We are different from all the oligarchies of the past, in that we know what we are doing. All the others, even those who resembled ourselves, were cowards and hypocrites.
  • We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it. Power is not a means; it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power.
  • He also felt that his mother’s love for him and his awareness of her death as a tragedy belonged to a bygone age when words like love and tragedy had some real meaning just as human individuals possessed some real dignity.
  • The old civilizations claimed that they were founded on love or justice. Ours is founded upon hatred. In our world there will be no emotions except fear, rage, triumph, and self-abasement. Everything else we shall destroy— everything.
  • We shall abolish the orgasm. Our neurologists are at work upon it now. There will be no loyalty, except loyalty towards the Party. There will be no love, except the love of Big Brother. There will be no laughter, except the laugh of triumph over a defeated enemy. There will be no art, no literature, no science.
  • There will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasures will be destroyed. But always— do not forget this, Winston— always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless.
    If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face— forever.
  • If you are a man, Winston, you are the last man. Your kind is extinct; we are the inheritors. Do you understand that you are alone? You are outside history, you are non-existent.

Chapter 4

  • To die hating them, that was freedom.

Chapter 5

  • "You asked me once," said O'Brien, "what was in Room 101. I told you that you knew the answer already. Everyone knows it. The thing that is in Room 101 is the worst thing in the world."

Chapter 6

Under the spreading chestnut tree
I sold you and you sold me.
There lie they, and here lie we
Under the spreading chestnut tree.
  • "They can't get inside you," she had said. But they could get inside you. "What happens to you here is forever," O'Brien had said. That was a true word. There were things, your own acts, from which you could never recover. Something was killed in your breast: burnt out, cauterized out.
  • Under the spreading chestnut tree
    I sold you and you sold me.
    There lie they, and here lie we
    Under the spreading chestnut tree.
  • But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother.

Appendix

  • The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

WARNING: Nineteen Eighty-Four will NOT enter the public domain in the United States of America until 2044 and in the European Union until 2020, although it is public domain in countries such as Canada, Russia, and Australia.


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Etymology

From George Orwell’s book Nineteen Eighty-Four

Adjective

1984

  1. dystopic, Orwellian

Quotations

  • 1984 I don’t want to support Mr Studds in his statement, but it is a 1984 kind of Orwellian argument you get into. — United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs — The Role of Arms Control in U.S. Defense Policy: Hearings Before the Committee on Foreign...

Wikibooks

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Nineteen Eighty-Four article)

From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection

This is a study guide for the book Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell. The entire book is available online at [1].

Table of Contents

  • Part 2
  • Part 3
  • Part 3/Chapter 1
  • Part 3/Chapter 2
  • Part 3/Chapter 3
  • Part 3/Chapter 4
  • Part 3/Chapter 5
  • Part 3/Chapter 6

A Note on Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is considered cheating. Don't use other people's words or ideas without proper citations.


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Category:1984 article)

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Games released in 1984.

Subcategories

This category has the following 12 subcategories, out of 12 total.

A

D

E

I

M

N

T

U


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1950s  1960s  1970s  - 1980s -  1990s  2000s  2010s

Years: 1981 1982 1983 - 1984 - 1985 1986 1987
1984 by topic:
Subject:      Archaeology - Architecture - Art
Aviation - Film - Home video - Literature (Poetry)
Meteorology - Music (Country, Metal)
Rail transport - Radio - Science
Sports - Television - Video gaming
Countries:      Australia - Canada - India - Ireland - Malaysia - New Zealand - Norway - Pakistan - Singapore - South Africa - Soviet Union - UK - Zimbabwe
Leaders:    Sovereign states - State leaders
Religious leaders - Law
Categories: Births - Marriages - Deaths - Introductions
Establishments - Disestablishments - Awards

Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar).


Contents  (full)
1 Events of 1984
Jan. . Feb. . March . April
May . June . July  .  Aug.
Sept. . Oct. . Nov. .  Dec.
Undated . Ongoing . Fictional
2 Births
3 Deaths  -  Ship events
4 Nobel prizes -  Templeton Prize
5 See also -  Notes -  External links

Events of 1984

January

January
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31

February

February
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29

March

March
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31

April

April
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30

May

May
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31

June

June
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30

July

July
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31

August

August
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31
The launch of Shuttle Discovery on STS-41-D, its first mission.

September

September
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October

October
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31

November

November
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30

December

December
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31

Undated

  • Famine in Ethiopia begins and kills a million people by the end of 1984. (1984 Famine in Ethiopia).
  • Crack, a smokeable form of cocaine, is first introduced into the Los Angeles area and soon spreads across the United States in what came to be known as the Crack Epidemic.
  • A peace agreement between Kenya and Somalia was signed in the Egyptian capital Cairo in December 1984. With this agreement, in which Somalia officially renounced its historical territorial claims, relations between the two countries began to improve.
  • Chatham Dockyard in Medway, England closed after being used a shipbuilding yard for over 400 years since the reign of King Henry VIII.
  • Homosexual Acts between consenting adults decriminalized in NSW+ NT, Australia.
  • Brothels legalized in Victoria.

Ongoing

Fictional

The events about 1984 in popular fiction are:

  • Film:
  • Literature:
  • Television:
  • Computer/video games:
  • Set in 1984: Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories (2006)
1984 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1984
MCMLXXXIV

Ab urbe condita 2737
Armenian calendar 1433
ԹՎ ՌՆԼԳ
Bahá'í calendar 140 – 141
Buddhist calendar 2528
Coptic calendar 1700 – 1701
Ethiopian calendar 1976 – 1977
Hebrew calendar 5744 – 5745
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 2039 – 2040
 - Shaka Samvat 1906 – 1907
 - Kali Yuga 5085 – 5086
Holocene calendar 11984
Iranian calendar 1362 – 1363
Islamic calendar 1404 – 1405
Japanese calendar Shōwa

59


(昭和 59年)

 - Imperial Year Kōki 2644
(皇紀2644年)
Julian calendar 2029
Korean calendar 4317
Thai solar calendar 2527

Births

January-February

March-April

May-June

July-August

September-October

November-December

Deaths

January - June

July - December

Unknown dates

  • (none)

Ship events

Nobel prizes

Templeton Prize

See also

People of the year 1984 at Familypedia

4 people were born in 1984

Father Mother Age mother at birth
Eldon Sebastian Kozaks (1984- 2109) Brent Eugene Johnston Lori Kay Denison
Amanda Leigh Moore (1984) Don Moore Stacy
Jackson Rathone (1984) Monroe Jackson Rathbone IV
Eric Trump (1984) Donald John Trump (1946) Ivana Marie Zelničkova (1949)

0 children were born to the 1 women born in 1984

11 people died in 1984

Father Mother Age at death
Henry Jefferson Percival Bate (1906-1984) Henry John Bate (1881-1967) Lily Percival (?-?) 7878
Gertrude Winifred Bray (1894-1984) George Bray (1867-1947) Fanny Seranna Doust Munsie (1868-1914) 9090
Roy Vincent Bulley (1909-1984) George Bulley (1869-1919) Louisa Amelia Everingham (1868-1944) 7575
Ralph Edward Denning (1907-1984) Ellis Dea Denning (1883-1959) Elizabeth Stevens (1888-1963) 7777
Minnie Ellem (1889-1984) Francis William Ellem (1858-1944) Sarah Ann Sneesby (1863-1931) 9595
Keith Everingham (1909-1984) Sydney Ernest Everingham (1865-1944) Elizabeth Marion Bulley (1871-1936) 7575
Maud M Hoy (1899-1984) Arthur Osborn Hoy (1875-1966) Eva Mary Bowden (1878-1963) 8585
Hazel Johns (1901-1984) William Johns (?-?) Emily J Woodlands (1869-1942) 8383
Minnie Maud Kennewell (1895-1984) John Kennewell (1859-1909) Sarah Furner (1863-1925) 8989
Conrad LeRoy Klawuhn (1915-1984) Conrad Herman Klawuhn (1891-1965) Julia Louise Zehnder (1891-1979) 6969
Piet Tol (1915-1984) Jacob Tol (1870-1920) Marijtje Spek (1872-1949) 6969


250 people lived in 1984

Father Mother
Carl David Anderson (1905-1991) Carl David Anderson (1878) Emma Adolfina Ajaxson (1878)
Adella May Anthoney (1907-1990) Charles Anthoney (c1867-1955) Esther Louisa Long (1871-1946)
Ruby Apps (1906-1991) William Apps (1861-1941) Olive Mary Hannah Crouch (1877-1926)
Grace Enid Baglin (1933-2006) Edward William Burgess Baglin (1906-1969) Florence Eveline Jenner (1901-1994)
Marion Zena Baker (1908-1996) William Josiah Baker (1875-1957) Lydia Jessie Tracey (1877-1964)
James Edward Purcell Baldwin (1905-1990) John Henry Baldwin (1877-1948) Agnes Agatha Purcell (1875-1948)
Arthur Allan Bang (1922-2004) Hans Bang (1897-1972) Clara Anna Bertha Andersen (1897-1968)
Henry Jefferson Percival Bate (1906-1984) Henry John Bate (1881-1967) Lily Percival (?-?)
Geertje Beentjes (1907-1991) Johannes Beentjes (?-?) Maria Catharine de Boer (?-?)
Donald E. Beers (1923-1998) Pearl A. Beers (1888-1962) Mary B. Nichols (1895-1960)
Eleanor C. Beers (1916-2004) Pearl A. Beers (1888-1962) Mary B. Nichols (1895-1960)
Ingrid of Sweden (1910-2000) Gustav VI Adolf of Sweden (1882-1973) Margaret of Connaught (1882-1920)
Bernhard zur Lippe-Biesterfeld (1911-2004) Bernhard zur Lippe (1872-1934) Armgard von Sierstorpff-Cramm (1883-1971)
Annie Elizabeth Bonney (c1902-1986)
Ethel Maud Bowden (1891-1986) George Bowden (1859-1943) Emma Jane May (1861-1947)
… further results

Events of the year 1984 at Familypedia

3 people were married in 1984.

Joined with
James Robert Duggar (1965) Michelle Ruark (1966)
Myrtle Louise Stickler (1902-?) George Clough (c1916-?)+Reuben Lee (1902-1993)
Joop Tol (1956-) Edith de Jong (1963-)+Theresia M. Schep (1958-)


There were 0 military battles in 1984.

0.016 0 0.044
1984

Notes

External links

Table of contents

Contents


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at 1984. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about 1984RDF feed
Birth rate 0.016  +
Births 4  +
Deaths 11  +
Fertility 0  +
Mortality 0.044  +
People 250  +
Year 1,984  +

This article uses material from the "1984" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

This article is about the year. For the book by George Orwell, see Nineteen Eighty-Four

1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1950s  1960s  1970s  - 1980s -  1990s  2000s  2010s
Years: 1981 1982 1983 - 1984 - 1985 1986 1987

Contents

Events

  • March 22 – People said the teachers at the McMartin preschool in Manhattan Beach, California were abusing the children in the school. The police found out that this was not true.
  • March 23 – Sarah Tisdall, who told The Guardian newspaper that cruise missiles were coming to Britain, was sentenced to six months imprisonment.
  • March 24 – The Wran Government was chosen in NSW for a 4th term.
  • April 4President Ronald Reagan said that no one should use chemical weapons.
  • April 12 – Four young Palestinians took an Israeli bus hostage. Israeli special forces got onto the bus and freed the hostages. They killed 1 hostage and two of the hijackers. Two other hijackers were captured and killed by Ehud Yatom. He crushed their skulls while they were tied up. Shin Bet chief Abraham Shalom told them to do this. It caused a major scandal (Kav 300 affair).
  • April 13 – India started Operation Meghdoot. They took control of most of the Siachen Glacier in Kashmir.
  • April 17 – WPC Yvonne Fletcher was shot dead by a hidden gunman outside the Libyan Embassy in London during the event known as the 1984 Libyan Embassy Siege.
  • April 19Advance Australia Fair was named as Australia's national anthem, and green and gold as the national colours.
  • April 25 – The end of Sultan Haji Ahmad Shah Al-Mustain Billah ibni Almarhum Sultan Sir Abu Bakar Riayatuddin Al-Muadzam Shah's as the 7th Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia.
  • April 26 – Baginda Almutawakkil Alallah Sultan Iskandar Al-Haj ibni Almarhum Sultan Ismail, the Sultan of Johor becomes the 8th Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia.
  • May 2 – The Liverpool Garden Festival opens in Liverpool.
  • May 8 – The Soviet Union announced that it was not going to the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California.
  • May 8 – Denis Lortie killed three people who worked for the government in the National Assembly of Quebec building.
  • May 11 – A transit of Earth from Mars takes place.
  • May 14 – The one dollar coin is introduced in Australia.
  • May 19 – Game show contestant Michael Larson won $100,000 on the game show Press Your Luck. Later, people found out that he won the money by mainly using only two squares of the Press Your Luck "Big Board."
  • May 22 – Helen Branch was declared legally dead (she disappeared 1977)
  • May 27Fluminense won the Brazilian soccer league, against the Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama.
  • June 5 – The Indian government began Operation Blue Star. It was a planned attack on the Golden Temple in Amritsar.
  • June 6Indian troops attack the Golden Temple at Amritsar, the Sikh's holiest shrine. They killed about 1,000 people.
  • June 8 – A deadly tornado almost destroyed Barneveld, Wisconsin. It killed nine people, injured almost 200 people, and caused over $25,000,000 in damage.
  • June 8 – The film Ghostbusters comes out in theaters. It becomes a summer blockbuster hit. The song "Ghostbusters" by Ray Parker Jr. became a Top 40 hit.

Births

Deaths

Films released

  • Amadeus
  • Splash
  • Missing in Action
  • Revenge of the Nerds
  • Ghostbusters

Hit songs

  • Van Halen – Jump
  • Ray Parker, Jr. – Ghostbusters (Los Cazafantasmas)
  • Phil Collins – Against All Odds

New books

  • L'Amant – Marguerite Duras
  • The Aquitaine ProgressionRobert Ludlum
  • The Big U – Neal Stephenson (debut novel)
  • Brother in the Land – Robert Swindells
  • The Butter Battle BookDr. Seuss
  • Empire of the Sun – James Ballard
  • First Among Equals – Jeffrey Archer
  • The Fourth Protocol – Frederick Forsyth
  • Full CircleDanielle Steel
  • Lincoln: A Novel – Gore Vidal
  • Love and War – John Jakes
  • Hotel du Lac – Anita Brookner
  • The Lover – Marguerite Duras
  • MoneyMartin Amis
  • NeuromancerWilliam Gibson
  • The Outsider – Howard Fast
  • The Practice Effect – David Brin
  • Random Hearts – Warren Adler
  • Role of Honour – John Gardner
  • A Shock to the System – Simon Brett
  • The Sicilian – Mario Puzo
  • Slow Learner: Early Stories – Thomas Pynchon
  • Stanley and the WomenKingsley Amis
  • The TalismanStephen King, Peter Straub
  • Thinner – Richard Bachman (nom de plume for Stephen King)
  • The Tie That Binds – Kent Haruf
  • The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
  • White NoiseDon DeLillo
  • The Witches of EastwickJohn Updikekrc:1984 джыл








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message