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1992 Republican National Convention
1992 Presidential Election
George H. W. Bush, President of the United States, 1989 official portrait.jpg Quayle.jpg
Convention
Date(s) August 17 - August 20
City Houston, Texas
Venue Astrodome
Candidates
Presidential Nominee George H. W. Bush of Texas
Vice Presidential Nominee Dan Quayle of Indiana
1988  ·  1996

The 1992 National Convention of the Republican Party (GOP) of the United States was held in the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, from August 17 to August 20, 1992. The convention re-nominated President George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Vice President Dan Quayle of Indiana.

Contents

Overview

The convention is most notable in that it featured the last major address of former President Ronald Reagan's long political career. In his address, Reagan told Americans that

whatever else history may say about me when I'm gone, I hope it will record that I appealed to your best hopes, not your worst fears, to your confidence rather than your doubts. My dream is that you will travel the road ahead with liberty's lamp guiding your steps and opportunity's arm steadying your way. My fondest hope for each one of you—and especially for the young people here—is that you will love your country, not for her power or wealth, but for her selflessness and her idealism. May each of you have the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct, and the hand to execute works that will make the world a little better for your having been here.

Lagging in the polls by double digits to the Clinton-Gore team after a highly successful Democratic Convention, and with Ross Perot temporarily out of the race, the Republican Party worked hard to rally its base of social conservatives. The convention is also remembered for the perception it reinforced of a Republican Party committed to social conservative values. This perception was emphasized by Pat Buchanan's famous opening night "culture war" speech where he argued that a great battle of values was taking place in the United States. Some considered the speech to be racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic and generally intolerant in character. (Molly Ivins memorably quipped that the speech "probably sounded better in the original German."[1]). Arguably, the speech ended up alienating more moderate Republican voters and many speculate caused them to move over to the Bill Clinton camp, while Ross Perot was out of the race at this point. However, polls by ABC News and the Los Angeles Times showed an increase in Bush support in the days following Buchanan's speech.

Republican National Committee chairman Rich Bond when talking about the Democrats also claimed that "we are America, they are not America". Marilyn Quayle dismissed Bill Clinton's claim to a new generation of leadership by saying, "Not everyone demonstrated, dropped out, took drugs, joined in the sexual revolution or dodged the draft."[2] The Clinton campaign criticized and used it to their advantage to portray Bush and the GOP as being out of touch and too far to the right for the general public in the post-Cold War era.

During Bush's acceptance speech he thanked former President Richard Nixon for his advice and contributions to the administration's foreign policy. This would be Nixon's last RNC, as he died in 1994.

The convention energized the Republican base, giving the Bush-Quayle ticket a short-lived bounce in the polls.[3] The bounce faded, and the race returned to a lopsided double digit Clinton-Gore lead.[4] However, the race narrowed considerably when Ross Perot rebooted his insurgent campaign.[5]

The official Tally

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President

Vice President

Vice President Dan Quayle was renominated by voice vote.

See also

References

External links

Preceded by
1988
New Orleans, Louisiana
Republican National Conventions Succeeded by
1996
San Diego, California

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