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2011 ICC Cricket World Cup
World cup logo 11.gif
Logo of the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One-Day International
Tournament format(s) Round robin and Knockout
Host(s)  India
 Bangladesh
 Sri Lanka
Champions TBD
Participants 14 (from 104 entrants)
Matches played 49 (to be played)
Official website ICC World Cup Site
2007 (Previous) (Next) 2015

The 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup will be the tenth Cricket World Cup, and will be hosted by three South Asian Test cricket playing countries: India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. It will be Bangladesh's first time co-hosting a Cricket World Cup. The World Cup will use cricket's One Day International format, with fourteen national cricket teams scheduled[1] to compete. The World Cup will take place during the months of February and March 2011, with the first match being played on 19 February 2011.[2]

The World Cup was also to be co-hosted by Pakistan, but in the wake of the 2009 attack on the Sri Lanka national cricket team in Lahore, the capital of the Pakistani province of Punjab, the International Cricket Council (ICC) were forced to strip Pakistan of its hosting rights.[3] The headquarters of the organising committee were originally situated in Lahore, but have now been shifted to Mumbai.[4] Pakistan was supposed to hold 14 matches, including one semi-final.[5] Eight of Pakistan's matches have been awarded to India, four to Sri Lanka and two to Bangladesh.[6]

Contents

Host selection

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Bids

The ICC originally announced its decision on which countries would host the 2011 World Cup on 30 April 2006. Australia and New Zealand also bid for the tournament, and a successful Australasian bid for the 2011 World Cup would have seen a 50-50 split in games, with the final still up for negotiation. The Trans–Tasman bid, Beyond Boundaries, was the only bid for 2011 delivered to ICC headquarters in Dubai ahead of the 1 March deadline. Considerable merits of the Australasian bid were the superior venues and infrastructure and the total support of both the New Zealand and Australian governments on tax and customs issues during the tournament, according to Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland[7]. The New Zealand government had also given assurance that Zimbabwe would be allowed to compete in the tournament, following political discussions in the country whether their cricket team should be allowed to tour Zimbabwe in 2005. The Australian bid also won the support of former West Indies captain Shivnarine Chanderpaul[8]

ICC President Ehsan Mani said the extra time taken by the Asian bloc to hand over its bid compliance book had harmed the four-nation bid. However, when the time came to vote, Asia won the hosting rights by ten votes to three[7]. The Pakistan Cricket Board has revealed that it was the vote of the West Indies Cricket Board that swung the matter, as the Asian bid had the support of the four bidding countries along with South Africa and Zimbabwe[9]. It was reported in Pakistani newspaper Dawn that the Asian countries promised to hold fund-raising events for West Indian cricket during the 2007 World Cup, which may have influenced the vote[10]. However, chairman of the Monitoring Committee of the Asian bid, I. S. Bindra, said it was their promise of extra profits in the region of US$ 400 million that swung the vote[11], that there "was no quid pro quo for their support"[12], and that playing the West Indies had "nothing to do with the World Cup bid"[12].

International cricket politics lie at the heart of the dispute. Since cricket is the most popular sport in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, Asia is of fundamental financial importance to the International Cricket Council[13]. However, historically, international cricket has been controlled by the "Old Commonwealth" nations of England, Australia, and New Zealand, supported by South Africa.[citation needed] The centre of cricketing politics has moved, over time, with the money, and the Asian nations, particularly India under the guidance of Jagmohan Dalmiya, looking for greater control in the direction of international cricket, and in 2005 Dalmiya said that the Indian subcontinent should host every third World Cup[13].

Staging of matches

Pakistan stripped of co-host status

Pakistan were stripped of its rights as co-host of the 2011 World Cup by the ICC on 17 April 2009 [14] due to ongoing concerns about the "uncertain security situation" prevailing in the country, especially in the aftermath of the attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore.

The Pakistan Cricket Board has hinted that it may refuse to participate in the World Cup if they are asked to play in India [15]. However, there is no concrete evidence whether this will actually happen.

It is estimated that the PCB will lose $10.5 million due to the tournament being taken away from them.[16] This figure only includes the match-fee of $750,000 per match guaranteed by the ICC. The overall loss to the PCB and the Pakistani economy is expected to be much greater.

On 9 April 2009, PCB chairman Ijaz Butt revealed that they had issued a legal notice to oppose ICC's decision.[17] However, the ICC claims that the PCB is still a co-host and they have only shifted the matches out of Pakistan.[18] Pakistan have proposed that South Asia host the 2015 World Cup and Australia/New Zealand host 2011, however this option has not found favour with their co-hosts and hence seems unlikely.[19]

Allocation of matches

On 11 April 2005, Pakistan Cricket Board chairman Shaharyar Khan announced an agreement about the allocation of games [20]. The original plan involved India hosting the final, while Pakistan and Sri Lanka would host the semi-finals.[21] and the opening ceremony will take place in Bangladesh.[22]

After being stripped of its co-host status, Pakistan made the bid to host its home games in the cities of UAE as a neutral home venue. This is in response to the fact that the last few months of cricket that Pakistan has played, has been in the cities of Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Sharjah. The pitches in these stadia have also been developed to suit the Pakistani players. This would not harm any timing schedules as there are regular flights from the city of Mumbai to Dubai.

However, on 28 April 2009, the ICC announced the re-allocation of matches originally intended to be played in Pakistan. As a result, India will now host 29 matches across eight venues including the final and one semi-final; Sri Lanka will host 12 in three venues, including one semi-final; while Bangladesh will stage eight at two grounds as well as the opening ceremony on 18 February 2011.[23]

Format

Late in 2007, the four host nations agreed upon a revised format for the 2011 World Cup, in which 14 teams will participate instead of 16. The first round of the tournament will be a round-robin similar to the one held in South Africa in the 2003 edition in which the 14 teams are divided into 2 groups of 7 teams each. The 7 teams play each other once with the top four from each group qualifying for the quarter-finals. The format ensures that each team gets to play a minimum of six matches even if they are ruled out of the tournament due to early defeats. One semi-final of the tournament was officially handed over to India, after Pakistan were stripped of its rights to host the tournament.

Qualification

As per ICC regulations, all 10 full members automatically qualify for the World Cup, including Zimbabwe who have given up their test playing status until the standard of their team improves.[24]

Team Mode of Qualification
 Australia ICC Full Member
 Bangladesh ICC Full Member
 England ICC Full Member
 India ICC Full Member
 New Zealand ICC Full Member
 Pakistan ICC Full Member
 South Africa ICC Full Member
 Sri Lanka ICC Full Member
 West Indies ICC Full Member
 Zimbabwe ICC Full Member

The ICC also organised a qualifying tournament in South Africa to determine which Associate teams would participate in 2011 event. Ireland who had been the best performing Associate nation since the last World Cup, won the tournament, beating Canada in the final. The Netherlands and Kenya also qualified by virtue of finishing third and fourth respectively.

Team Mode of Qualification
 Ireland 1st place in 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier
 Canada 2nd place in 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier
 Netherlands 3rd place in 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier
 Kenya 4th place in 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier

Venues

Although all the Indian stadiums for the 2011 World Cup had been finalised [25] before but the venues of Bangladesh and Sri Lanka were finalised on 9 November 2009. A detailed release about venues of the World Cup will be released later.

Venues in Sri Lanka
Venues in Bangladesh
Kolkata Colombo New Delhi Kandy Ahmedabad
Eden Gardens
Capacity: 95,000
R. Premadasa Stadium
Capacity: 37,000
Feroz Shah Kotla
Capacity: 48,000
Pallekele International Cricket Stadium
Capacity: 35,000
(new stadium)
Sardar Patel Stadium
Capacity: 54,000
Eden Gardens.jpg Image not available.png Image not available.png Sardar Patel Stadium.JPG
Chittagong Chennai Dhaka
Chittagong Divisional Stadium
Capacity: 26,000
M. A. Chidambaram Stadium
Capacity: 50,000
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium
Capacity: 47,000
Image not available.png MAC Chepauk stadium.jpg Ispahani End, Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium.jpg
Mumbai Hambantota Mohali Nagpur Bangalore
Wankhede Stadium
Planned capacity: 45,000
(being upgraded)
Hambantota International Cricket Stadium
Capacity: 33,000
(new stadium)
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium
Capacity: 30,000
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium
Capacity: 45,000
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium
Capacity: 42,000
Wankhede-night.jpg Image not available.png LightsMohali.png VCA stadium.jpg MChinnaswamy-Stadium.jpg

Media coverage

The World Cup has grown as a media event with each tournament. International Cricket Council has sold the rights for broadcasting of 2011 Cricket World Cup for around US$ 2 Billion to ESPN Star Sports. The tournament would be broadcasted all around the world in about 220 countries.

Matches

Group Stage

Group A

Team sc Pld W T L NR NRR PCF
 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Kenya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Pakistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Sri Lanka 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Zimbabwe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
20 February 2011

New Zealand 
v  Kenya
M. A. Chidambaram Stadium, Chennai

Attendance:

20 February 2011

Sri Lanka 
v  Canada
Hambantota International Cricket Stadium, Hambantota

Attendance:

21 February 2011

Australia 
v  Zimbabwe
Sardar Patel Stadium, Ahmedabad

Attendance:

23 February 2011

Pakistan 
v  Kenya
Hambantota International Cricket Stadium, Hambantota

Attendance:

25 February 2011

New Zealand 
v  Australia
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur

Attendance:

26 February 2011

Sri Lanka 
v  Pakistan
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

28 February 2011

Zimbabwe 
v  Canada
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur

Attendance:

1 March 2011

Sri Lanka 
v  Kenya
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

3 March 2011

Pakistan 
v  Canada
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

4 March 2011

New Zealand 
v  Zimbabwe
Sardar Patel Stadium, Ahmedabad

Attendance:

5 March 2011

Sri Lanka 
v  Australia
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

7 March 2011

Kenya 
v  Canada
Feroz Shah Kotla, Delhi

Attendance:

8 March 2011

Pakistan 
v  New Zealand
Pallekele International Cricket Stadium, Kandy

Attendance:

10 March 2011

Sri Lanka 
v  Zimbabwe
Pallekele International Cricket Stadium, Kandy

Attendance:

13 March 2011

New Zealand 
v  Canada
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai

Attendance:

13 March 2011

Australia 
v  Kenya
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bengaluru

Attendance:

14 March 2011

Pakistan 
v  Zimbabwe
Pallekele International Cricket Stadium, Kandy

Attendance:

16 March 2011

Australia 
v  Canada
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bengaluru

Attendance:

18 March 2011

Sri Lanka 
v  New Zealand
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai

Attendance:

19 March 2011

Pakistan 
v  Australia
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

20 March 2011

Zimbabwe 
v  Kenya
Eden Gardens, Kolkata

Attendance:

Group B

Pts Pld W T L NR NRR PCF
 Bangladesh 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 England 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 India 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Netherlands 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 South Africa 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 West Indies 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
19 February 2011

India 
v  Bangladesh
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium, Dhaka

Attendance:

22 February 2011

England 
v  Netherlands
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur

Attendance:

24 February 2011

South Africa 
v  West Indies
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi

Attendance:

25 February 2011

Bangladesh 
v  Ireland
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium, Dhaka

Attendance:

27 February 2011

India 
v  England
Eden Gardens, Kolkata

Attendance:

28 February 2011

West Indies 
v  Netherlands
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi

Attendance:

2 March 2011

England 
v  Ireland
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bengaluru

Attendance:

3 March 2011

South Africa 
v  Netherlands
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali

Attendance:

4 March 2011

Bangladesh 
v  West Indies
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium, Dhaka

Attendance:

6 March 2011

India 
v  Ireland
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bengaluru

Attendance:

6 March 2011

England 
v  South Africa
M. A. Chidambaram Stadium, Chennai

Attendance:

9 March 2011

India 
v  Netherlands
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi

Attendance:

11 March 2011

Ireland 
v  West Indies
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali

Attendance:

11 March 2011

Bangladesh 
v  England
Chittagong Divisional Stadium, Chittagong

Attendance:

12 March 2011

India 
v  South Africa
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur

Attendance:

14 March 2011

Bangladesh 
v  Netherlands
Chittagong Divisional Stadium, Chittagong

Attendance:

15 March 2011

South Africa 
v  Ireland
Eden Gardens, Kolkata

Attendance:

17 March 2011

England 
v  West Indies
M. A. Chidambaram Stadium, Chennai

Attendance:

18 March 2011

Ireland 
v  Netherlands
Eden Gardens, Kolkata

Attendance:

19 March 2011

Bangladesh 
v  South Africa
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium, Dhaka

Attendance:

20 March 2011

India 
v  West Indies
M. A. Chidambaram Stadium, Chennai

Attendance:

Knockout stage

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
                   
23 March - Bangladesh Dhaka        
 Group A 1  
29 March - Sri Lanka Colombo
 Group B 3    
 quarter finals 1st Winner  
24 March - Sri Lanka Colombo
     quarter finals 3rd Winner    
 Group A 2  
2 April - India Mumbai
 Group B 4    
 semi finals 1st Winner  
25 March - Bangladesh Dhaka    
   semi finals 2nd Winner  
 Group A 4  
30 March - India Mohali
 Group B 2    
 quarter finals 2nd Winner  
26 March - India Ahmedabad
     quarter finals 4th Winner    
 Group A 3  
 Group B 1    
 

Quarter-finals

23 March 2011

TBD
v TBD
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium, Dhaka

Attendance:

24 March 2011

TBD
v TBD
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

25 March 2011

TBD
v TBD
Sher-e-Bangla Cricket Stadium, Dhaka

Attendance:

26 March 2011

TBD
v TBD
Sardar Patel Stadium, Ahmedabad

Attendance:

Semi-finals

29 March 2011

TBD
v TBD
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo

Attendance:

30 March 2011

TBD
v TBD
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali

Attendance:

Final

2 April 2011

'TBD'
v 'TBD'
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai

Attendance:

See also

  • 2011 Cricket World Cup:

References and notes

  1. ^ "2011 World Cup Schedule". from CricketWorld4u. http://www.cricketworld4u.com/series/icc-world-cup-2011/. Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  2. ^ "Final World Cup positions secured". from BBC. 2009-04-17. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/cricket/8005063.stm. Retrieved 2009-04-17. 
  3. ^ "No World Cup matches in Pakistan". BBC. 2009-04-18. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/cricket/other_international/pakistan/8004684.stm. Retrieved 2009-04-17. 
  4. ^ "World Cup shifts base from Lahore to Mumbai". Cricinfo. http://content.cricinfo.com/india/content/current/story/401726.html. Retrieved 2009-04-17. 
  5. ^ "Pakistan counts cost of Cup shift". BBC. 2009-04-18. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/cricket/other_international/pakistan/8004684.stm. Retrieved 2009-04-18. 
  6. ^ "Pakistan nears solution to World Cup dispute". AFP. http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gjlcwb7FGlFoUn2QjftFetKAeYOQ. Retrieved 2009-07-31. 
  7. ^ a b "Asia to host 2011 World Cup". Cricinfo. http://content-uk.cricinfo.com/ci/content/current/story/245789.html. Retrieved 2006-04-30. 
  8. ^ Richard Boock. "Cricket: West Indies skipper backs Kiwi bid for 2011 World Cup". New Zealand Herald. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/event/story.cfm?c_id=497&ObjectID=10370498. Retrieved 2006-03-01. 
  9. ^ "West Indies deal secured 2011 World Cup". Cricinfo. http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/ci/content/story/245956.html?CMP=OTC-RSS. Retrieved 2006-05-02. 
  10. ^ "Asia promises spectacular World Cup". Dawn. http://www.dawn.com/2006/05/02/spt1.htm. Retrieved 2005-05-02. 
  11. ^ "Promise of profit won Asia the bid - Bindra". Cricinfo. http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/india/content/story/246390.html. Retrieved 2006-05-07. 
  12. ^ a b "Bindra: No deal with West Indies board". Cricinfo. http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/india/content/story/246276.html. Retrieved 2006-05-05. 
  13. ^ a b Trevor Marshallsea. "Caught behind in race for Cup". Sydney Morning Herald. http://www.smh.com.au/news/cricket/caught-behind-in-race-for-cup/2005/10/10/1128796466288.html. Retrieved 2005-10-11. 
  14. ^ "World Cup matches moved out of Pakistan". Cricinfo. http://content.cricinfo.com/ci/content/story/400154.html. Retrieved 2009-04-17. 
  15. ^ "Pakistan may reject playing 2011 WC matches in India". Sify. http://sify.com/sports/fullstory.php?a=jetpCkfhejd&title=Pakistan_may_reject_playing_2011_WC_matches_in_India&?vsv=TopHP2. Retrieved 2009-04-19. 
  16. ^ "Cricket-Pakistan counts financial losses of World Cup shift". Reuters. http://uk.reuters.com/article/cricketNews/idUKSP40546620090418. Retrieved 2009-04-18. 
  17. ^ http://content.cricinfo.com/pakistan/content/current/story/403690.html
  18. ^ "ICC clears air over PCB's claims". Cricinfo. http://content.cricinfo.com/ci-icc/content/current/story/404371.html. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  19. ^ "Pakistan discusses two World Cup options". Cricinfo. http://content.cricinfo.com/pakistan/content/current/story/404585.html. Retrieved 2009-05-17. 
  20. ^ "Asian bloc faces stiff competition over 2011 bid". Cricinfo. http://content-uk.cricinfo.com/ci/content/story/245060.html. Retrieved 2006-04-22. 
  21. ^ "India to host 2011 World Cup final". Cricinfo. http://content-uk.cricinfo.com/ci/content/current/story/252718.html. Retrieved 2006-07-08. 
  22. ^ "India lands 2011 World Cup final". BBC. 2006-07-08. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/cricket/5160396.stm. Retrieved 2006-07-09. 
  23. ^ "India to host 2011 World Cup final". Cricinfo. http://content.cricinfo.com/india/content/current/story/401840.html. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  24. ^ "No Test Cricket For Zimbabwe - ICC". Radiovop. http://www.radiovop.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6051&Itemid=171. 
  25. ^ India unveil eight World Cup venues. Retrieved on 17th October 2009.

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