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3,4-Dimethoxyphenethylamine
DMPEA.png
IUPAC name
Other names 3,4-Dimethoxyphenethylamine
Identifiers
CAS number 120-20-7
SMILES
Properties
Molecular formula C10H13NO2
Molar mass 181.23 g/mol
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

DMPEA, or 3,4-dimethoxy-phenethylamine, is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. DMPEA was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), DMPEA has shown to produce no effects when tested with very high doses, such as 1000 mg or 10 mg intravenous. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of DMPEA. This chemical occurs naturally, along with 4-hydroxy-3,5-DMPEA, in Opuntia exaltata, a species of "Prickly Pear" cactus.

See also

External links


3,4-Dimethoxyphenethylamine
Identifiers
CAS number 120-20-7 Y
PubChem 8421
ChemSpider 8114
SMILES
InChI
InChI key
Properties
Molecular formula C10H13NO2
Molar mass 181.23 g/mol
 Y (what is this?)  (verify)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

3,4-Dimethoxyphenethylamine (DMPEA) is a chemical compound of the phenethylamine class. It is an analogue of dopamine where the 3- and 4-position hydroxy groups have been replaced with methoxy groups. It is also closely related to mescaline which is 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine.

DMPEA was first synthesized and assayed by Alexander Shulgin.[1] In his book PiHKAL, he describes DMPEA as producing no effects when tested even with very high doses, such as 1,000 mg orally or 10 mg via intravenous injection.[1] As a result, it can be assumed that it is biologically inactive.[1] However, it has been shown to have some activity as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor.[2]

DMPEA occurs naturally along with mescaline in various species of cacti such as San Pedro and Peruvian Torch.[3][4][5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Erowid Online Books : "PIHKAL" - #60 DMPEA". http://www.erowid.org/library/books_online/pihkal/pihkal060.shtml. 
  2. ^ Keller WJ, Ferguson GG (July 1977). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "Effects of 3,4-dimethoxyphenethylamine derivatives on monoamine oxidase"]. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 66 (7): 1048–50. PMID 886445. 
  3. ^ Lundström J (December 1970). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "Biosynthesis of mescaline and 3,4-dimethoxyphenethylamine in Trichocereus pachanoi Br&R"]. Acta Pharmaceutica Suecica 7 (6): 651–66. PMID 5511715. 
  4. ^ Pummangura S, Nichols DE, McLaughlin JL (October 1977). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "Cactus alkaloids XXXIII: beta-phenethylamines from the Guatemalan cactus Pilosocereus maxonii"]. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 66 (10): 1485–7. PMID 925910. 
  5. ^ Pardanani JH, McLaughlin JL, Kondrat RW, Cooks RG (1977). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "Cactus alkaloids. XXXVI. Mescaline and related compounds from Trichocereus peruvianus"]. Lloydia 40 (6): 585–90. PMID 600028. 

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