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308th Armament Systems Wing: Wikis

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308th Armament Systems Wing
308th Armament Systems Wing.png
308th Armament Systems Wing emblem
Active 19xx-Present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Garrison/HQ Eglin AFB, Florida
Decorations Presidential Unit Citation ribbon.svg DUC
Outstanding Unit ribbon.svg AFOUA

The United States Air Force's 308th Armament Systems Wing (308 ARSW) is a non-flying wing based at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

Contents

Overview

The wing was activated in 2004 to design, develop, field and maintain a family of air-to-ground munitions that enhance warfighter strike capabilities.

The mission of the 308th Armament Systems Wing is to enhance worldwide Air Force combat capability, effectiveness, aircrew survivability, and readiness through joint development, procurement, deployment and sustainment. This mission is executed by air combat test and training systems, expeditionary support equipment, munitions handling equipment and armament subsystems, Explosive Ordnance Disposal support equipment, and realistic Electronic Warfare threat simulators.

The 308 ARSW designs, develops, produces, fields, and sustains a family of air-to-ground and air-to-air munitions, enhancing warfighter capabilities (both U.S. and allies) in defeating a spectrum of enemy targets

Units

The 308 ARSW is a critical component of the Air Armament Center, which covers the complete weapon-system life-cycle from concept through development, acquisition, experimental testing, procurement, operational testing and final employment in combat.

The wing consists of over 400 highly qualified personnel trained in the development, test, acquisition, fielding, and operational support of systems such as the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM), Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM), Small Diameter Bomb (SDB), Sensor Fuzed Weapon (SFW), Wind Corrected Munitions Dispenser (WCMD) and a host of other specialized programs.

History

For additional lineage and history, see 308th Armament Systems Group
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Lineage

  • Established as 308 Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 4 Oct 1951
Activated on 10 Oct 1951
Inactivated 25 Jun 1961
  • Redesignated 308 Strategic Missile Wing (ICBM-Titan), and activated, on 29 Nov 1961
Organized on 1 Apr 1962
Inactivated 18 Aug 1987
  • Consolidated (3 May 2006) with Air to Ground Munitions Systems Wing, which was established 23 Nov 2004.
Activated 27 Jan 2005
Redesignated 308 Armament Systems Wing on 15 May 2006.

Assignments

Attached to 21st Air Division, 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952
Attached to 5th Air Division, 21 Aug-c. 26 Oct 1956

Components

Groups

  • 308th Bombardment Group: 10 Oct 1951-16 Jun 1952 (not operational)

Squadrons

  • 303 Air Refueling: attached 1 Feb 1956-15 Jul 1959
  • 308 Air Refueling: 8 Jul 1953-15 Jun 1959 (detached 1-21 Jun 1954, 5 Jan-4 Mar 1956, and 2 Apr-2 Jul 1958)
  • 373 Bombardment (later, 373 Strategic Missile): attached 10 Oct 1951-15 Jun 1952 (not operational, 10 Oct-5 Nov 1951), assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961); assigned 1 Apr 1962-18 Aug 1987
  • 374 Bombardment (later, 374 Strategic Missile): attached 10 Oct 1951-15 Jun 1952 (not operational, 10 Oct-5 Nov 1951), assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961); assigned 1 Sep 1962-15 Aug 1986
  • 375 Bombardment: attached 10 Oct 1951-15 Jun 1952 (not operational, 10 Oct-13 Nov 1951), assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961)
  • 425 Bombardment: 1 Oct 1958-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961).

Stations

Aircraft and Missiles

Operations

Cold War

Activated in 1951 at Forbes Air Force Base, Kansas. Initially equipped with B-29s, but was upgraded to B-47 Stratojets the next year. Also received KC-97 tankers. Over the next eight years, tie 308th conducted strategic bombardment training and air refueling to meet SAC's global commitments.

Deployed to bases in North Africa three times, twice in detachment form and once as a unit (Sidi Slimane Air Base Morocco, August 21 – October 26, 1956). From November 1956 to March 1957, tested SAC alert plan by maintaining one-third of its bomber and tanker force on continuous alert.

Part of unit went to 2nd Bomb Wing at Hunter AFB, Georgia. Bulk moved to Plattsburgh AFB, New York on July 15, 1959, where its aircraft were placed under the control of the 380th Bomb Wing.

Not operational as a wing from July 1959 to June 1961. It was redesignated and activated on November 20, 1961.

In early 1962 the Air Force established 18 Titan II launch sites at SAC's Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. The 308th was reactivated as the 308th Strategic Missile Wing, being organized on April 1, 1962. The wing became fully operational with eighteen sites in December 1963.

  • Assigned to: Second Air Force, 825th Strategic Aerospace Division on 1 April 1962.
  • Reassigned to: Second Air Force, 42nd Air Division on 1 January 1970.
  • Reassigned to: Fifteenth Air Force, 17th Strategic Aerospace Division on 31 March 1970.
  • Reassigned to: Fifteenth Air Force, 12th Strategic Missile Division on 30 June 1971.
  • Reassigned to: Second Air Force, 42nd Air Division on 1 April 1973.
  • Reassigned to: Eighth Air Force, 42nd Air Division on 1 January 1975.
  • Reassigned to: Eighth Air Force, 19th Air Division on 1 December 1982.

Gained control over first missile complex in August 1962 and became fully operational with 18 sites in December 1963.

In October 1981, US President Ronald Reagan announced that all Titan II sites would be deactivated by October 1, 1987, as part of a strategic modernization program. The wing completed deactivation on August 18, 1987.

Modern era

Activated in 2004 to design, develop, field and maintain a family of air-to-ground munitions that enhanced warfighter strike capabilities.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links


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