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Eastern Hemisphere at the beginning of the 4th century AD.
Eastern Hemisphere at the end of the 4th century AD.
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 3rd century · 4th century · 5th century
Decades: 300s 310s 320s 330s 340s
350s 360s 370s 380s 390s
Categories: BirthsDeaths
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century (per the Julian calendar and Anno Domini/Common era) was that century which lasted from 301 to 400.

Contents

Overview

In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine I, who became the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium in 330 (over of the current capitals, which had effectively been changed by Diocletian's reforms to Milan in the West, and Nicomedia in the East) to build the city soon called Nova Roma (New Rome); it was later renamed Constantinople in his honor.

The last emperor to control both the eastern and western halves of the empire was Theodosius I. As the century progressed after his death it became increasingly apparent that the empire had changed in many ways since the time of Augustus. The two emperor system originally established by Diocletian in the previous century fell into regular practice, and the east continued to grow in importance as a centre of trade and imperial power, while Rome itself diminished greatly in importance due to its location far from potential trouble spots, like Central Europe and the East. Late in the century Christianity became the official state religion, and the empire's old pagan culture began to disappear. General prosperity was felt throughout this period, but recurring invasions by Germanic tribes plagued the empire from AD 376 onward. These early invasions marked the beginning of the end for the Western Roman Empire.

According to archaeologists, sufficient archaeological correlates of state-level societies coalesced in the 4th century to show the existence of the Three Kingdoms (AD 300/400–668) of Baekje, Goguryeo, and Silla.

Events

Contemporary bronze head of Constantine I.

Significant People

  • Ambrose, Chriatian theologian, bishop of Milan whose preaching converted Augustine
  • Augustine, Christian theologian, bishop of Hippo
  • Basil the Great, Christian theologian, bishop in Cappadocia
  • Constantine I,([[]]-337), Roman Emperor
  • Damasus I, Pope, sponsor of Jerome
  • Fa-Hsien, Chinese Buddhist monk
  • Gregory of Nanzienz, Christian theologian, bishop
  • Jerome, Christian priest, monk, and translator of the Bible into Latin
  • John Chrysostom, Syrian-born Patriarch of Constantinople
  • Kumarajiva, (344-413), Buddhist monk from India, translator of sutras into Chinese
  • Tao-un, (312-385), Chinese Buddhist monk, translator who elimnates Taoist words from Buddhist writings
  • Wulfias, Arian priest and translator of the Bible into Gothic

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

References

  1. ^ Roberts, J: "History of the World". Penguin, 1994.
  2. ^ The stirrup and its effect on chinese military history
  3. ^ The invention and influences of stirrup

Greek Fire

External links

Decades and years


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 3rd century · 4th century · 5th century
Decades: 300s 310s 320s 330s 340s
350s 360s 370s 380s 390s
Categories: BirthsDeaths
Establishments – Disestablishments

As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century (per the Julian/Gregorian calendar and Anno Domini era) was that century which lasted from 301 to 400.

Contents

Overview

In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine I, who became the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium in 330 (over of the current capitals, which had effectively been changed by Diocletian's reforms to Milan in the West, and Nicomedia in the East) to build the city soon called Nova Roma (New Rome); it was later renamed Constantinople in his honor.

The last emperor to control both the eastern and western halves of the empire was Theodosius I. As the century progressed after his death it became increasingly apparent that the empire had changed in many ways since the time of Augustus. The two emperor system originally established by Diocletian in the previous century fell into regular practice, and the east continued to grow in importance as a centre of trade and imperial power, while Rome itself diminished greatly in importance due to its location far from potential trouble spots, like Central Europe and the East. Late in the century Christianity became the official state religion, and the empire's old pagan culture began to disappear. General Prosperity was felt throughout this period, but recurring invasions by Germanic tribes plagued the empire from AD 376 onward. These early invasions marked the beginning of the end for the Western Roman Empire.

According to archaeologists, sufficient archaeological correlates of state-level societies coalesced in the 4th century to show the existence of the Three Kingdoms (AD 300/400-668) of Baekje, Goguryeo, and Silla.

Events

Contemporary bronze head of Constantine I.

Significant people

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

References

  1. ^ Roberts, J: "History of the World.". Penguin, 1994.
  2. ^ The stirrup and its effect on chinese military history
  3. ^ The invention and influences of stirrup

External links

Decades and years

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at 4th century. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

This article uses material from the "4th century" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

Centuries: 3rd century - 4th century - 5th century
Decades: 300s 310s 320s 330s 340s 350s 360s 370s 380s 390s

The 4th century is the century from 301 to 400.

Decades and years

Note: years before or after the 4th century are in italics.

290s 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299
300s 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309
310s 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319
320s 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329
330s 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339
340s 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349
350s 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359
360s 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369
370s 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379
380s 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389
390s 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399
400s 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409








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