The Full Wiki

More info on 88th United States Congress

88th United States Congress: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

88th United States Congress
USCapitol1962.jpg
United States Capitol (1956)

Duration: January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1965

President of the Senate: Lyndon Johnson
President pro tempore: Carl Hayden
Speaker of the House: John W. McCormack
Members: 100 Senators
435 Representatives
Senate Majority: Democratic
House Majority: Democratic

Sessions
1st: January 9, 1963 – December 30, 1963
2nd: January 7, 1964 – October 3, 1964
<87th 89th>

The Eighty-eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1963 to January 3, 1965, during the last year of the administration of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, and the first administration of his successor, U.S. President Lyndon Johnson. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Eighteenth Census of the United States in 1960, and the number of members was again 435 (had temporarily been 437 in order to seat one member each from recently-admitted states of Alaska and Hawaii). Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Contents

Major events

  • March 30 – June 10, 1964: The longest filibuster in the history of the Senate was waged against the Civil Rights Act of 1964, with 57 days of debate over a 73 day period. It ended when the Senate voted 71–29 to invoke cloture, the first successful cloture motion on a civil rights bill.[1][2][3]

Major legislation

Party summary

Composition of the Senate at the start of the 88th Congress
     80.1-100% Republican      80.1-100% Democratic
     60.1-80% Republican      60.1-80% Democratic
           
House seats by party holding plurality in state
Advertisements

Senate

Other 0 TOTAL members: 100

House of Representatives

TOTAL members: 435

Officers

Senate

House of Representatives

Members

Senate

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

1. Pierre Salinger (D), appointed August 4, 1964, resigned December 31, 1965
1. George Lloyd Murphy (R), appointed January 1, 1965

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

2. Walter Mondale (DFL), appointed to fill vacancy

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

1. Joseph Montoya (D), elected to fill vacancy

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

2. Fred R. Harris (D), elected to fill vacancy

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

2. Herbert S. Walters (D), appointed to fill vacancy
2. Ross Bass (D), elected to fill vacancy

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

House of Representatives

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

5. Phillip Burton (D), elected to fill vacancy
23. Del M. Clawson (R), elected to fill vacancy

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

9. William L. Hungate (D), installed November 3, 1964

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

1. Mark Andrews (R), elected to fill vacancy

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

1. Wendell Wyatt (R), elected to fill vacancy

Pennsylvania

5. William J. Green, III (D), elected to fill vacancy
15. Fred B. Rooney (D), elected to fill vacancy
23. Albert W. Johnson (R), elected to fill vacancy

Rhode Island

South Carolina

5. Thomas S. Gettys (D), elected to fill vacancy

South Dakota

Tennessee

2. Irene Baker (R), elected to fill vacancy

Texas

10. J. J. Pickle (D), elected to fill vacancy

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Non-voting members

References

  1. ^ Loevy, Robert D. (1997). The Civil Rights Act of 1964: the passage of the law that ended racial segregation. SUNY Press. pp. 358,360. 
  2. ^ "Civil Rights Filibuster Ended". U.S. Senate. http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/Civil_Rights_Filibuster_Ended.htm. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  3. ^ "Major Features of the Civil Rights Act of 1964". CongressLink. The Dirksen Congressional Center. http://www.congresslink.org/print_basics_histmats_civilrights64text.htm. 

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message