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9th Bomb Squadron
9th Bomb Squadron.jpg
9th Bomb Squadron Patch
Active 14 June 1917 - 29 June 1922
1 April 1931 - 6 January 1946
1 October 1946 - 25 June 1968
2 July 1969 - 15 August 1992
1 October 1993 - Present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Type Strategic Bombing
Part of Air Combat Command
12th Air Force
7th Bomb Wing
7th Operations Group
Garrison/HQ Dyess Air Force Base
Nickname Bats
Engagements World War I
World War II
Operation Desert Fox
Operation Enduring Freedom
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Decorations Presidential Unit Citation ribbon.svg DCU
Outstanding Unit ribbon.svg AFOUA
Presidential Unit Citation (Philippines).svg PPUC

The 9th Bomb Squadron (9 BS) is part of the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. It operates B-1 Lancer aircraft providing strategic bombing capability. Estasblished 14 June 1917 the 9th is the oldest active bomb squadron in the Air Force.

Contents

Mission

Strengthening a legacy of more than 90 years of professionalism, initiative and flexible combat power by cultivating a proud team of combat leaders dedicated to the mission, fellow Bats, and the USA

Steel on Target...Anytime, Anywhere

History

The 9 BS saw combat with First Army as observation unit specializing in night reconnaissance, 2 September 1918 – 11 November 1918, and subsequently served with Third Army as part of occupation forces until May 1919. It then patrolled the Mexican border from August 1919 to April 1920 and c. January-July 1921.

The squadron flew Antisubmarine patrols off the California coast, 8 December -c. 12 December 1941. The 9th went on to fly combat missions in Southwest Pacific, c. 13 January c. 1 March 1942, the China-Burma-India Theater, 2 April 1942 – 4 June 1942, 22 November 1942 to 10 June 1944, and 19 October 1944 to 10 May 1945, the Mediterranean Theater of Operations from, c. 4 July 1942 – 1 October 1942, and transportation of gasoline to forward bases in China from, 20 June 1944 – 30 September 1944 and June-September 1945.

The 9th deployed B-52s and aircrews for combat in Southeast Asia, June-November 1965. It trained B-52 aircrews to maintain combat readiness from, 1971 - 1992. It has provided aircraft and aircrews for conventional taskings since 1993, when the 9th Bomb Squadron starting flying the B-1B. The unit flew more than 300 combat sorties during its four-month deployment in mid- 2006 in support of the war on terrorism.

Operations

Lineage

  • 9th Aero Squadron (1917 - 1921)
  • 9th Squadron (1921 - 1923)
  • 9th Observation Squadron (1923)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron (1923 - 1939)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) (1939 - 1943)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy (1943 - 1946)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy (1946 - 1948)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy (1948 - 1969)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron, Medium (1969 - 1971)
  • 9th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy (1971 - 1991)
  • 9th Bomb Squadron (1991 - Present)

Unit Emblem

The 9th Bomb Squadron's patch features 3 spotlights aiming skyward, as if searching for the bombers which are commencing their attack. One spotlight shines vertically, while the other two cross each other. This forms an IX, which is the Roman Numeral for 9.

Assignments

  • 1st Army Observation Group (1918)
  • 3rd Army Air Service (1918 – 1919)
  • Western Department (1919 – 1920)
  • 9th Corps Area (1920 – 1922)
  • 7 Bombardment Group (1931 – 1946)
    • Attached: United States Army Middle East Air Force (28 June – c. 4 October 1942)
  • 7th Bombardment Wing (1946 – 1968)
  • 340th Bombardment Group (1969 – 1971)
  • 7th Bomb Wing (1971 - 1992, 1993 - Present)

Bases stationed

Aircraft Operated

See also

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links








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