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ASU-85
ASU-85 6 Dywizji Powietrznodesantowej.jpg
ASU of the Polish 6th Air Assault Brigade
Type Self-propelled gun
Place of origin  Soviet Union
Specifications
Weight 15.5 tonnes (34,171 lbs)
Length 6 m (19.68 ft)
Width 2.8 m (9.18 ft)
Height 2.1 m (6.88 ft)
Crew 4

Armor 40 mm (1.57 in) (glacis)
Primary
armament
85mm SD-44 main gun
Secondary
armament
7.62mm PKT coaxial machine gun
Engine V-6 inline water-cooled diesel, 240hp (179 kw)
Suspension torsion bar
Operational
range
260 km (161.5 mi)
Speed 45 km/h (28 mph)

The ASU-85 (Russian: Авиадесантная самоходная установка, АСУ-85, Aviadesantnaya Samokhodnaya Ustanovka, 'airborne self-propelled mount') is a Soviet airborne self-propelled gun of the Cold War.

Soviet Airborne Forces used the ASU-85 in airborne operations. Its primary role was light infantry support or assault, with limited anti-tank capability. The ASU-85 replaced the open-topped ASU-57 in service. It weighs approximately 14,000kg or 13.78 tons and has a very low silhouette of just 2,1 meters. It is powered by one V-6 six-in-line water-cooled diesel engine with 240hp. It was designed on the PT-76 tank chassis, but lost amphibic capabilities. Armament consists of an SD-44 85mm gun carrying 40 rounds (4 rounds per minute) and one 7.62mm PKT co-axial machinegun. Effective range is around 260km (162 miles), and armour protection is up to 40mm. The vehicle was NBC-sealed and equipped with IR-sights for night fighting.

The ASU-85 became possible with the introduction of the Mi-6 and Mi-10 helicopters and high-capacity multi-chute and retro-rocket systems for fixed wing-drops. It was first observed by NATO in 1962, and was widely used by Soviet and Polish airborne units.

References

  • Gunston B., 'Army Weapons', in: Bonds R. (ed.), Soviet War Power, (Corgi 1982), p. 203-204

External links

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