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aSmallWorld is an online social network service similar to Facebook and LinkedIn. Dubbed "Snobster" by critics,[1] it is an exclusive invitation-only network with roughly 550,000 members [2] founded by Erik Wachtmeister.

Contents

Features

aSmallWorld shares many features with other social network services, such as profiles, an event calendar, and private messaging.[3] Unlike most other such services, aSmallWorld allows users to list multiple cities as their location of residence.

aSmallWorld offers 70 detailed "city guides" written by its members detailing and rating high-quality clubs, bars and restaurants.[4] Members can also buy and sell items, find executive talent and business partners, rent property, and find flatmates using aSmallWorld's private forums.

Members

According to Erik Wachtmeister, "members are people with large personal networks, frequent travel and highly active personally." Most aSmallWorld users come from European countries, but over the past three years emphasis has shifted to the US, in line with the company's relocation to New York and the staff hiring spree in 2006 and 2007 in that city. London, New York and Paris are the top three cities of residence. Erik Wachtmeister has been quoted as stating that 20% of current members have the right to invite others. According to Wachtmeister, aSmallWorld keeps "track of people's behavior and we actually do kick people out." Members who don't follow the site's code of conduct may result in internal exile to "aBigWorld". Typical infractions would be creating fake profiles, using profane language, using the site for self promotion, or excessively connecting with or contacting other members without knowing them.

aSmallWorld has enrolled over 500,000 members since its launch. The expansion of the membership base has consistently increased by 70% annually since 2005.

aBigWorld

Bigworld.jpg

aSmallWorld is patrolled regularly for suspicious activity or members who are not closely connected enough to its main userbase.[5] Problematic users are immediately exiled to a separate network called aBigWorld; when exiled users log in, they will find that the color scheme of the website has changed from blue to green, and they no longer have access to aSmallWorld profiles or forum posts.[6]

Funding

In May 2006, Harvey Weinstein's The Weinstein Company invested a significant amount in the site as their first online venture.[7] However, in October, 2009, Weistein sold a controlling stake in the company with a loss making history and cited a need to focus his company's resources on its struggling movie operations. As reported in the press release disseminated on Business Wire, the buyer of the majority of the Weinstein shares is twenty-five years old Swiss national Patrick Liotard-Vogt.

References

  1. ^ "Bin Laden in 'Hell'" by Xeni Jardin, Wired Magazine, August 2005
  2. ^ "Five Social Networking Sites Of The Wealthy" by Nicola Ruiz, Forbes.com, 2 May 2008
  3. ^ "Teaching case on aSmallWorld" by Thomas Langenberg and Alexander Schellong (Program on Networked Governance, Harvard University), ksg.harvard.edu/netgov, June 2007
  4. ^ Gawker: Sneaking Around aSmallWorld
  5. ^ aSmallWorld Gets Even Smaller by the editors, Gawker.com, 6 October 2004
  6. ^ "Social Software Company Profiles Wiki: aSmallWorld" by David Teten, TheVirtualHandshake.com, July 2005
  7. ^ Films From the Weinsteins Falter, but the Brothers Stay Focused - New York Times

See also

French Hackers Arrested In ASMALLWORLD Extortion Attemp...

http://www.hackinthebox.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=33065

External links


aSmallWorld
URL www.asmallworld.net
Type of site Professional network service
Registration Invitation-only
Launched March 2004
Current status Active

aSmallWorld is an on-line social network service similar to XING, and LinkedIn. It is an exclusive invitation-only network with roughly 770,000 members [1] that was founded by Erik Wachtmeister.

Contents

Features

aSmallWorld shares many features with other social network services, such as profiles, an event calendar, and private messaging.[2] Unlike most other such services, aSmallWorld allows users to list multiple cities for their locations of residences.

aSmallWorld offers seventy detailed "city guides" written by its members detailing and rating high-quality clubs, bars, and restaurants.[3] Members also may buy and sell items, find executive talent and business partners, rent property, and find flatmates using aSmallWorld's private forums.

Critics

aSmallWorld often is dubbed "Snobster" or "Friendster for the jet set" whose unique selling point is that almost no one can be a member,[4] say critics. Another problem is that wealthy and famous people cannot join aSmallWorld even if they want to - since in order to join the community you need an invitation from a friend. Finally, many members send invitations to their friends who aren't eligible to meet the original goal (i.e. rich members send invitations to poor friends, which is not what aSmallWorld intended to be). [5][6] Asmallworld often sends members to "a big world" - a website created as a punishment to aSmallWorld members who don't follow its terms.[7][8]

Members

According to Erik Wachtmeister, "members are people with large personal networks, frequent travel and highly active personality." Most aSmallWorld users come from European countries, but over the past three years emphasis has shifted to the U.S., in line with the company's relocation to Manhattan and the staff hiring spree there in 2006 and 2007. London, Manhattan, and Paris are the top three cities of residence.[citation needed] Erik Wachtmeister has been quoted as stating that twenty percent of current members have the right to invite others. According to Wachtmeister, aSmallWorld keeps "track of people's behavior and we actually do kick people out." Members whose behavior doesn't follow the site's code of conduct may find themselves exiled to "aBigWorld". Typical infractions would be creating fake profiles, using profane language, using the site for self-promotion, or excessively connecting with or contacting other members without knowing them.

aSmallWorld has enrolled over 700,000 members since its launch. The expansion of the membership base has consistently increased by seventy percent annually since 2005.

aBigWorld

aSmallWorld is patrolled regularly for suspicious activity or members who are not connected closely enough to its main userbase.[9] Problematic users are exiled immediately to a separate network called aBigWorld; when exiled users log in, they will find that the color scheme of the website has changed from blue to green, and they no longer have access to aSmallWorld profiles or forum posts.[10]

Funding

In May 2006, Harvey Weinstein's The Weinstein Company invested a significant amount in the site as their first online venture.[11] In October, 2009, however, Weinstein sold a controlling stake in the company with a loss making history and cited a need to focus his company's resources on its struggling movie operations. As reported in the press release disseminated on Business Wire, the buyer of the majority of the Weinstein shares is a twenty-five-years-old Swiss national, Patrick Liotard-Vogt.

References

  1. ^ "Five Social Networking Sites Of The Wealthy" by Nicola Ruiz, Forbes.com, 2 May 2008
  2. ^ "Teaching case on aSmallWorld" by Thomas Langenberg and Alexander Schellong (Program on Networked Governance, Harvard University), ksg.harvard.edu/netgov, June 2007
  3. ^ Gawker: Sneaking Around aSmallWorld
  4. ^ By Invitation Only, .net Magazine, 7 April 2006
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ [3]
  8. ^ [4]
  9. ^ aSmallWorld Gets Even Smaller by the editors, Gawker.com, 6 October 2004
  10. ^ "Social Software Company Profiles Wiki: aSmallWorld" by David Teten, TheVirtualHandshake.com, July 2005
  11. ^ Films From the Weinsteins Falter, but the Brothers Stay Focused - New York Times

See also

External links








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