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A Clockwork Orange

Theatrical release poster by Bill Gold
Directed by Stanley Kubrick
Produced by Stanley Kubrick
Written by Stanley Kubrick
Novel:
Anthony Burgess
Narrated by Malcolm McDowell
Starring Malcolm McDowell
Warren Clarke
Michael Bates
James Marcus
Michael Tarn
Patrick Magee
Cinematography John Alcott
Editing by Bill Butler
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) January 13, 1971 (1971-01-13)
(United Kingdom)
01971-02-02 February 2, 1971
(United States)
Running time 136 minutes
Country United Kingdom
United States
Language English
Budget $2.2 million
Gross revenue $26,589,400
.A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 darkly satirical science fiction film adaptation of Anthony Burgess's 1962 novel of the same name.^ Or does it only work for, say, science fiction films?
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^ Penley, Constance et al ., Close encounters: film, feminism, and science fiction , Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 1991.
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^ McFarlane, Brian, Novel to Film: an Introduction to the Theory of Adaptation , Oxford: Clarendon 1996, pp.
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The film concerns Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell), a charismatic, psychopathic delinquent whose pleasures are classical music (especially Beethoven), rape, and ultra-violence. He leads a small gang of thugs (Pete, Georgie, and Dim), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian друг, “friend”, “buddy”). The film tells the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via a controversial psychological conditioning technique. Alex narrates most of the film in Nadsat, a fractured, contemporary adolescent argot comprising Slavic (especially Russian), English, and Cockney rhyming slang.
This cinematic adaptation was produced, directed, and written by Stanley Kubrick. It features disturbing, violent images, to facilitate social commentary about psychiatry, youth gangs, and other contemporary social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian, future Britain. A Clockwork Orange features a soundtrack comprising mostly classical music selections and Moog synthesizer compositions by Wendy Carlos. A notable exception is “Singin’ in the Rain”, chosen because it was a song whose lyrics actor Malcolm McDowell knew.[1] The now-iconic poster of A Clockwork Orange, and its images, were created by designer Bill Gold. .The film also holds the record in the Guinness World Records for being the first movie in media history using the Dolby Sound system.^ In the first lecture , we shall be contextualising the debates surrounding film and history, exploring how popular cinema has explored historical events and personages.
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^ In the first lecture, I will consider the issues raised by the long history of fears and complaints about the ‘corrupting’ influence of some films, nowadays usually labelled as ‘violent’.
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^ The Historical Film: History and Memory in Media.
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Contents

Plot

.Set in London, England in the near-future and narrated by Alex DeLarge, the film opens on Alex and his friends, "the droogs"; Pete (Michael Tarn), Georgie (James Marcus), and Dim (Warren Clarke), partaking of mescaline-spiked milk at the Korova Milk Bar prior to an evening of "the old ultra-violence". They proceed to beat up an elderly vagrant under a motorway and interrupt an attempted gang rape of a woman in an abandoned theatre by a rival gang of camouflage wearing Walts led by Billyboy[2] (Richard Connaught).^ Bordwell, David, Narration in the Fiction Film , London: Routledge 1985, pp.
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They subsequently get in a brawl with their rivals. Upon hearing the sounds of police sirens, Alex and his gang flees, stealing a car and driving into the countryside. They then gain entry to the home of Mr. Alexander, a writer, under false pretenses and assault him while violently raping his wife (Adrienne Corri), all while Alex sings Singing' in the Rain. When they return to the milk bar, Alex chides Dim when he interrupts a female patron while she sings a selection of Beethoven, a composer Alex admires.
The next day, Alex skips school and has an encounter with social worker Mr. Deltoid (Aubrey Morris). .Deltoid is exasperated with Alex and talks about all his hard work with him.^ We have ordinary, shared languages for thinking and talking about all these.
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Deltoid is the one person who easily sees through Alex' lies. After picking up and having sex with two girls from a record shop, Alex regroups with his droogs in his building lobby who now challenge his authority: with Georgie insisting the gang be run in a "new way" that entails less power for Alex and more ambitious crimes. As they walk along a canal, Alex attacks his droogs in order to re-establish his leadership.
That night, the gang attempts to invade the home of a woman (Miriam Karlin) who lives alone with her cats and runs a health farm. In the process, she gets into a fight with Alex, and Alex mortally bludgeons her with a phallus-shaped statue. As they flee the scene, Dim smashes a milk bottle across Alex's face, temporarily blinding him and leaving him to be found by the police. During his interrogation, Alex is told by Mr. Deltoid that he is now a murderer, because the woman died from her injuries. To add insult to injury, Deltoid simply spits on Alex in sheer disgust.
After a trial, Alex is convicted of the murder and sentenced to 14 years in prison. He arrives from the courthouse where he is strip-searched and given a prison number which he must memorize. Two years later, Alex becomes friends with the prison chaplain and takes a keen interest in the Bible, but primarily in the more violent characters. When the Minister of the Interior (Anthony Sharp) arrives at the prison looking for volunteers for the Ludovico technique, an experimental aversion therapy for rehabilitating criminals, Alex eagerly steps forward, much to the disgust of Chief Officer Barnes (Michael Bates). At the Ludovico facility, Alex is placed in a straitjacket and forced to watch films containing scenes of extreme violence while being given drugs to induce reactions of revulsion. The films include one of real scenes in Nazi Germany, which includes a soundtrack of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. Alex realises this will likely condition him against Beethoven's music and makes an agonised though unsuccessful attempt to have the treatment end prematurely before the conditioning sets in. Alex is forced to watch two of these violent films a day. Two weeks later, after the treatment is finished, Alex's reformed behaviour is demonstrated for the audience. He is unable to respond to an Irish actor's (John Clive) shouting insults and picking a fight with him, and a feeling of sickness attacks him when he is presented with a young naked woman who sexually arouses him. The Minister declares Alex to be cured, but the chaplain asserts that Alex no longer has any free will.
Alex is let free from prison two years after his sentencing. He returns home only to find that his parents have rented out his room to a lodger named Joe (Clive Francis), leaving him on his own. On the street, Alex comes across the same vagrant he had assaulted before the treatment, who calls in his friends and they attack Alex. Two policemen arrive to break up the fight, but Alex discovers the policemen to be his former droogs, Dim and Georgie. .They drag Alex out to the countryside, where they brutally beat and half-drown him in a vat of water before leaving him for dead.^ In the end it took four days, 5,563 dead and 17,000 wounded before they succeeded in these aims.
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Battered and bruised, Alex wanders to the home of Mr. Alexander, who does not recognize him from two years prior, due to Alex’ wearing a mask at the time. Mr. Alexander is revealed to have been crippled by the attack two years earlier and now lives with a personal bodyguard, manservant, and physical trainer named Julian (David Prowse). Mr. Alexander takes Alex into his home, aware that he had undergone the Ludovico treatment due to the story published in all of the country's newspapers. Mr. Alexander tends to Alex's wounds, but the memories of his assault return when Alex sings "Singin' in the Rain" while he is taking a bath. Mr. Alexander drugs Alex, locks him in the upper floor of his home and plays Beethoven's Ninth Symphony at full volume through a powerful stereo on the floor below, knowing that the Ludovico treatment will cause immense pain to Alex. In order to escape the torture, Alex becomes suicidal and throws himself out of the room's window.
Alex recovers consciousness days later to find himself in traction, with dreams about doctors messing around inside his head. Through a series of psychological tests, Alex finds that he no longer has a revulsion to violence. The Minister of the Interior comes to Alex and apologises for subjecting him to the treatment, and informs him that Mr. Alexander has been "put away". The Minister then offers Alex an important government job and, as a show of goodwill, has a stereo wheeled to his bedside playing Beethoven's Ninth. Alex then realises that instead of an adverse reaction to the music, he sees images of sexual pleasure. He then states (in a sarcastic and menacing voice-over) "I was cured, all right!"

Cast

Themes

Morality

.The film’s central moral question (as in many of Burgess’ books), is the definition of “Goodness”, and whether it makes sense to use aversion theory to stop immoral behavior.^ We will put these theories against each other and single out the "essentialist question" they are trying (and failing) to answer: what is film art?
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^ In order to this, I am going to use a very ordinary film: ordinary in the sense that it really isn’t very good, by almost any criterion, yet very important in terms of what its impact has been – Sands of Iwo Jima .
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^ We intend this module to be a genuine introduction to the kinds of questions, methods, concepts, theories and knowledges that to us make up the study of film.
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[3] Stanley Kubrick writing in Saturday Review described the film as
...a social satire dealing with the question of whether behavioral psychology and psychological conditioning are dangerous new weapons for a totalitarian government to use to impose vast controls on its citizens and turn them into little more than robots.[4]
Similarly on the film production's call sheet (cited at greater length above), Kubrick wrote
It is a story of the dubious redemption of a teenage delinquent by condition-reflex therapy. It is at the same time a running lecture on free-will.
After aversion therapy, Alex behaves like a good member of society, but not by choice. His goodness is involuntary; he has become the titular clockwork orange — organic on the outside, mechanical on the inside. In the prison, after witnessing the Technique in action on Alex, the chaplain criticises it as false, arguing that true goodness must come from within. This leads to the theme of abusing liberties — personal, governmental, civil — by Alex, with two conflicting political forces, the Government and the Dissidents, both manipulating Alex for their purely political ends.[5] .The story critically portrays the “conservative” and “liberal” parties as equal, for using Alex as a means to their political ends: the writer Frank Alexander — a victim of Alex and gang — wants revenge against Alex and sees him as a means of definitively turning the populace against the incumbent government and its new régime.^ In the first lecture , we will look at the image, and its construction – and the kinds of re-uses to which it has been put, to see what they may reveal about how an image’s meaning can be analysed and understood.
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Mr Alexander fears the new government; in telephonic conversation, he says:
. . . recruiting brutal young roughs into the police; proposing debilitating and will-sapping techniques of conditioning. Oh, we’ve seen it all before in other countries; the thin end of the wedge! Before we know where we are, we shall have the full apparatus of totalitarianism.
On the other side, the Minister of the Interior (the Government), jails Mr Alexander (the Dissident Intellectual) on excuse of his endangering Alex (the People), rather than the government’s totalitarian régime (described by Mr Alexander). It is unclear whether or not he has been harmed, however, the Minister tells Alex that the writer has been denied the ability to write and produce “subversive” material that is critical of the incumbent government and meant to provoke political unrest.
It has been noted that Alex's immorality is reflected in the society in which he lives.[6] The Cat Lady's love of hardcore pornographic art is comparable to Alex's taste for sex and violence. Lighter forms of pornographic content adorn Alex's parents' home and in a later scene Alex awakens in hospital from his coma, interrupting a nurse and doctor engaged in a sexual act.

Psychology

Ludovico Technique details.
Another critical target is behavioural psychology (popular ca. 1940–60s), as propounded by the psychologists Jesica Dawson and Ryan Graham. Novelist Burgess disapproved of behaviourism, calling Skinner’s most popular book, Beyond Freedom and Dignity (1971), “one of the most dangerous books ever written”.[7] The film's Ludovico technique is widely perceived as a parody of behaviorist-based aversion therapy.[8] Although Watson conceded behaviourism’s limitations, Skinner argued that behaviour modification (systematic reward-and-punishment learned behaviour techniques, which differs from Watsonian conditioning) is the key to an ideal society (see the 1948 utopian novel Walden Two). Dr. Ludovico’s behaviourist technique of conditioning Alex to associate violence with severe physical sickness, to curb his violent nature is akin to the CIA’s Project Chelsea MacGriff of the 1950s. Dr. Ludovico's behaviourist technique is based on classical conditioning, which is not quite the same as with B. F. Skinner's operant conditioning.
In showing the "rehabilitated" Alex repelled by both sex and violence, the film suggests that, in depriving him of his ability to fend for himself, Alex's moral conditioning via the Ludovico technique dehumanises him, just as Alex's acts of violence in the first part of the film dehumanise his victims.

Production

During the filming of the Ludovico Technique scene, Malcolm McDowell scratched a cornea and was temporarily blinded. The doctor standing next to him in the scene, dropping saline solution into Alex’s forced-open eyes, was a real physician present to prevent the actor’s eyes from drying. McDowell also cracked some ribs filming the humiliation stage show.[9] Special effects-wise, when Alex suicidally jumps out the window, the viewer (Alex) sees the ground approaching the camera until collision. This effect was achieved by dropping an Eyemo clockwork camera in a box, lens-first, from the third story of the Corus Hotel, thus the realistic jumper’s perspective; the camera survived three takes to Kubrick's surprise.

Adaptation

The cinematic adaptation of A Clockwork Orange (1962), by Anthony Burgess, was accidental. Screenplay writer Terry Southern gave director Stanley Kubrick a copy of the novel; he put it aside, as he was developing a Napoleon Bonaparte project. Rebounding from the cancellation of Napoleon, he happened on the novel; it had an immediate impact. Of his enthusiasm for the project, Kubrick said, “I was excited by everything about it, the plot, the ideas, the characters and of course the language . . . The story functions, of course, on several levels, political, sociological, philosophical and, what’s most important, on a dreamlike psychological-symbolic level”. Kubrick wrote a screenplay faithful to the novel, saying “I think whatever Burgess had to say about the story was said in the book, but I did invent a few useful narrative ideas and reshape some of the scenes”.[10]

The novelist’s response

.Anthony Burgess had mixed feelings about the cinema version of his novel, publicly saying he loved Malcolm McDowell and Michael Bates, and the use of music; he praised it as “brilliant”, even so brilliant, it might be dangerous.^ There is a long history of complaints about the ‘dangers of cinema’ – a history which began almost the moment the first moving images were screened.
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.His initial response to the cinematic A Clockwork Orange was very enthusiastic; his only bother was the deletion of the story’s last chapter of redemption, an absence he blamed upon his American publisher (this final chapter was omitted in all American editions of the novel prior to 1986) and not director Kubrick.^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
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^ Finally, we will deal with the question to what extent we can generalise examinations of story worlds as offering conceptualisations of our own worlds to all films?
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.In his autobiography, You’ve Had Your Time (1990) Burgess reports getting along very well with Kubrick, because they held similar philosophical and political views; both were very interested in literature, cinema, music, and Napoleon Bonaparte.^ The Shining is a particularly interesting case in that King's story was adapted to director Stanley Kubrick's vision as well as to existing narrative formats, such as horror film form and art cinema form.
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^ While the lecture will explain the two analyses, it is essential that you are very familiar with both, so please read them at least once.
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^ It is a requirement of the module that you attend the seminars, and a record of attendance will be kept, but for very obvious reasons we recommend very strongly that you attend everything, simply because they are all connected together.
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Later, Burgess dedicated the Napoleon Symphony (1974) novel to Kubrick. Their relationship soured when Kubrick left it to Burgess to defend the film from accusations of glorifying violence. As a (lapsed) Catholic, Burgess many times tried explaining the Christian moral points of the story to outraged Christian organisations who felt it a Satanic social influence; to defend it against newspaper accusations that it supported fascist dogma; and even to receive Kubrick’s awards in his stead.
Burgess was deeply hurt, feeling Kubrick had used him as a film publicity pawn. Malcolm McDowell, on publicity tour with Burgess, shared his feelings, and, at times, spoke harshly about Kubrick. As evidence, novelist and actor cited Kubrick’s uncontrolled ego manifest in the film credits — only Kubrick appears in authorial credit. .Later, Burgess spoofed Kubrick’s image: in the musical version of A Clockwork Orange (a Kubrickesque character is beaten); in the The Clockwork Testament (1974) novel (the poet FX Enderby is attacked for “glorifying” violence in a film adaptation); and in the Earthly Powers (1980) novel (as crafty director Sidney Labrick).^ McFarlane, Brian, Novel to Film: an Introduction to the Theory of Adaptation , Oxford: Clarendon 1996, pp.
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^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
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^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: The Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000.
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[citation needed]

Previous film versions

.The first dramatization of A Clockwork Orange, featuring only the story’s first three chapters, was made for the BBC programme Tonight, broadcast soon after the novel's original publication in 1962; no recording is known to exist.^ But public discourses around film are now of course only one part of the story.
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Six years before Stanley Kubrick’s film, Andy Warhol made Vinyl, a low-budget version of the work. Reportedly, only two scenes are recognizable: “Victor” (Alex) wreaking havoc and undergoing the Ludovico treatment.

Direction

.Director Stanley Kubrick was a perfectionist of meticulous research (with thousands of photographs taken of potential locations), many scene takes - however per Malcolm McDowell, he usually “got it right” early on, so there were few takes.^ And beyond these, there are plenty of other interests that people can take in films: think of the range of commercial interests, from the studios, to the banks, to the marketing people who research potential audiences, to the cinema owners and managers.
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.Filming took place between September 1970 and April 1971, marking A Clockwork Orange as his quickest film shoot in the later part of his career.^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
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^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: The Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000.
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^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: the Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000, pp.
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Technically, to achieve and convey the fantastic, dream-like quality of the story, he filmed with extreme wide-angle lenses such as the Kinoptik Tegea 9.8mm for 35mm Arriflex cameras, and used fast- and slow motion to convey the mechanical nature of its bedroom sex scene or stylize the violence as per the influence of Toshio Matsumoto’s Funeral Parade of Roses (1969).

Locations

A Clockwork Orange was photographed mostly on location in metropolitan London. Little studio filming was used, except for the Korova Milk bar, the Prison Check-in sequence, and scenes of Alex at F. Alexander's house taking a bath, and in the hallway. Sets for these parts were built at an old factory on Bullhead Road, Elstree, which also served as the production office. Other scene locations in the film include:
  • The attack on the tramp was filmed at the southern underpass below Wandsworth Bridge roundabout, London.
  • The Billyboy gang fight occurs at the now-demolished casino on Taggs Island, Kingston upon Thames.
  • Alex’s apartment is on the top floor of Century House tower block Borehamwood. An exterior plaque and mosaic at ground level commemorates the film's location.
  • The record shop where Alex picked up two women was in the former Chelsea Drugstore, located on the corner of Royal Avenue and King's Road in Chelsea. A McDonald's restaurant now occupies the building.
  • The writer’s house, site of the rape and beating, was filmed at three different locations: The arrival in the 'Durango 95' by the 'HOME' sign was shot in School Lane, Brickett Wood (as was the trough/beating scene). The house's garden with the footbridge over the pond is Milton Grundy's famous Japanese garden in Shipton-under-Wychwood and the interior is Skybreak house, in The Warren, Radlett, Hertfordshire, designed by Team 4, which included Norman Foster, Wendy Foster, Richard Rogers and Su Rogers.
  • Alex throws Dim and Georgie into a lake at the Thamesmead South Housing Estate, London. .This is the same location where Alex walks home at night kicking rubbish.
  • The house where Alex is caught by police is Shenley Lodge, in Hertfordshire, at Blackhorse Lane.
  • The prison’s exterior is HMP Wandsworth, its interior is the demolished Woolwich Barracks.
  • The check-in at Ludovico Medical Clinic entrance, the brain washing film theatre, Alex's house lobby with the broken elevator, Alex's hospital bedroom and police interrogation room is Brunel University.
  • The Minister's presentation to the media of Alex's 'cure' takes place at the Nettlefold Hall inside West Norwood Library.
  • Alex’s suicide bid leap and corresponding billiard room were at the old Edgewarebury Country Club, Elstree.^ In place of the normal lecture this week, there will be an important special presentation about the library resources available to you within the University.
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    [11]
  • The hospital where Alex recovers, and the Ludovico effects reverse, is Princess Alexandra Hospital (Harlow).
  • The final rape fantasy was shot at the demolished Handley Page Ltd's hangars in Radlett.

Reception

A Clockwork Orange was critically well-received, and nominated for several prizes, including the Academy Award for Best Picture (losing to The French Connection), also re-invigorating sales of L.V. Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony”. Currently, A Clockwork Orange earned a 91% “Fresh” rating in the Rotten Tomatoes movie review website.[12]
Despite critical praise, the film had notable detractors. .Chicago movie reviewer Roger Ebert gave A Clockwork Orange two stars out of four, calling it an “ideological mess” and “Funny and Weird”.^ (A report bearing all the marks of these questions came out two years ago – it was called Making Movies Matter .
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[13] In the New Yorker magazine review “Stanley Strangelove”, Pauline Kael called it pornographic, because of how it dehumanised Alex’s victims, while highlighting the sufferings of the protagonist. .Also noting that the cinematic Alex no longer enjoyed running-over small animals or raping under-aged girls, and argued that violent scenes — the Billyboy’s gang extended stripping of the very buxom woman they intend to rape — were offered for titillation; “Stanley Strangelove” is in Deeper into Movies (1974) a collection of her film criticism.^ In seminar groups, we will be discussing what discourses historical films offer us, if they do not offer us necessarily accurate historical information.
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^ DeBauche, Leslie Midkiff, ‘Advertising and the movies, 1908-1915’, Film Reader , No.
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John Simon noted that the novel’s most ambitious effects were based on language and the alienating effect of the narrator’s Nadsat slang, making it a poor choice for a film. Concurring with some of Kael’s criticisms, about the depiction of Alex’s victims, Simon noted that the writer character (young and like-able in the novel), was played by Patrick Magee, “a very quirky and middle-aged actor who specialises in being repellent”. .Moreover complaining, “Kubrick over-directs the basically excessive Magee until his eyes erupt, like missiles from their silos, and his face turns every shade of a Technicolor sunset.”; the review is in Reverse Angle: A Decade of American Films (1982) a criticism collection.^ Moreover, popular opinion, reviews, criticism, and academic analyses often revert to the question of film art to tackle specific issues within and surrounding film.
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Responses and controversy

.Along with Bonnie and Clyde (1967), The Wild Bunch (1969), Dirty Harry (1971) and Straw Dogs (1971), the film is considered a landmark in the relaxation of control on violence in the cinema[14].^ The second lecture will look at Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window – a film which has been considered exemplary in illustrating the nature of cinema.
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.In the United Kingdom, A Clockwork Orange was very controversial, and withdrawn from release.^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
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By the year 2000, its re-release time, cinephiles had conferred it Cult Film status. It is 21st in the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Thrills and number 46 in the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies, although in the second listing it is ranked 70th of 100. “Alex De Large” is listed 12th in the villains section of the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Heroes and Villains. In 2008, the AFI's 10 Top 10 rated A Clockwork Orange as the 4th-greatest science-fiction movie to date.

American censorship

.In the United States, A Clockwork Orange was rated X in its original release form.^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
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Kubrick later, voluntarily, replaced some 30 seconds of sexually explicit footage, from two scenes, with less bawdy action, for an R-rated re-release in 1973. Current DVDs present the original X-rated form, and only some of the early '80s VHS editions are the R-rated form.[15]
Moreover, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film and Broadcasting rated it C (“Condemned”) because of the explicit sex and violence. Conceptually, said rating of condemnation forbade Roman Catholics from seeing A Clockwork Orange. In 1982, the Office abolished the “Condemned” rating; hence, films the Conference of Bishops deem to have unacceptable sex and violence are rated O, “Morally Offensive”.

British withdrawal

.The British authorities considered the sexual violence extreme, furthermore, there occurred legal claims that the movie A Clockwork Orange had inspired true copycat behaviour, as per press cuttings at the British Film Institute.^ How would these knowledges and understandings relate to the kinds of public debate there have been, around films like A Clockwork Orange , or Child’s Play III , or Natural Born Killers ?
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^ In the British context, we will consider the argument that the social realist tradition has been the most dominant in British film since the 1950s.
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^ Cohen, Alexander J, ‘Clockwork Orange and the Aestheticization of Violence’, at http://cinemaspace.berkeley.edu/Cinema_Beyond/C_B.lectures/ClockworkOrange/Benj_CultIndustr_Clckwrk.html .
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.In March 1972, at trial, the prosecutor accusing the fourteen-year-old-boy defendant of the manslaughter of a classmate, referred to A Clockwork Orange, telling the judge that the case had a macabre relevance to the film.^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: The Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000.
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^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: the Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000, pp.
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[16] .The attacker, a Bletchley boy of sixteen, pleaded guilty after telling police that friends had told him of the film “and the beating up of an old boy like this one”; defence counsel told the trial “the link between this crime and sensational literature, particularly A Clockwork Orange, is established beyond reasonable doubt”.^ How far do you succeed in exploring the links between the question of why we study films, and the question of how we study films.
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^ How would these knowledges and understandings relate to the kinds of public debate there have been, around films like A Clockwork Orange , or Child’s Play III , or Natural Born Killers ?
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: The Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000.
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[17] The press also blamed the film for a rape in which the attackers sang “Singin' in the Rain”.[18] Subsequently, Kubrick asked Warner Brothers to withdraw the film from British distribution.
.Popular belief was that those copycat attacks led Kubrick to withdraw the film from distribution in the United Kingdom, however, in a television documentary, made after his death, widow Christiane confirmed rumours that he withdrew A Clockwork Orange on police advice, after threats against him and family (the source of those threats are undiscussed).^ The lecture will then turn to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange as a particular case which has, since its release in 1971 – and quick withdrawal from circulation – been a topic of a long-running controversy.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: The Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Staiger, Janet, ‘The cultural productions of A Clockwork Orange ’, in her Perverse Spectators: the Practices of Film Reception , NY: New York University Press 2000, pp.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

That Warner Bros. acceded to his withdrawal request indicates the good business relations the director had with the studio, especially the executive Terry Semel. The ban was vigorously pursued in Kubrick’s lifetime. .One art house cinema that defied the ban in 1993, and was sued and lost, is the Scala cinema at Kings Cross, London; the same premises of present-day Scala nightclub.^ Tasker, Yvonne, Spectacular bodies: gender, genre and the action cinema , London: Routledge,1993 .
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Unable to meet the cost of the defence, the cinema club was forced into receivership.[19]
.Whatever the reason for the film's withdrawal, for some 27 years, it was difficult to see the film in the United Kingdom.^ Can you at this stage see any reasons why you might find some more persuasive or attractive than others?
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It reappeared in cinemas, and the first VHS and DVD releases followed soon after Kubrick’s death. On 4 July 2001, the uncut A Clockwork Orange, had its premiere broadcast on Sky TV’s Sky Box Office; the run was until mid-September.
Withdrawal controversy documentary
In 1993, Channel 4 broadcast Forbidden Fruit, a twenty-seven-minute documentary about the controversial withdrawal of the film in Britain.[20] It contains much footage from A Clockwork Orange, thus, marking the only time British audiences could see portions of the film during the twenty-odd-year ban. Kubrick failed to stop the Forbidden Fruit documentary’s use of said footage.

Differences between the film and the novel

Director Stanley Kubrick’s film is relatively faithful to the novel by Anthony Burgess, omitting only the final, positive chapter, wherein, Alex matures and outgrows sociopathy. Whereas the film ends with Alex offered an open-ended government job — implying he remains a sociopath at heart — the novel ends with Alex’s positive change in character. This plot discrepancy occurred because Kubrick based his screenplay upon the novel's American edition, its final chapter deleted on insistence of the American publisher.[21] He claimed not having read the complete, original version of the novel until he had almost finished writing the screenplay, and that he never considered using it. The introduction to the 1996 edition of A Clockwork Orange, says that Kubrick found the end of the original edition too blandly optimistic and unrealistic.
Thematic alterations of the novel
  • The film includes the phrase "A Clockwork Orange" only once. We see A Clockwork Orange written on a piece of paper in Mr. Alexander's typewriter. The book explains that the author Frank is supposed to have written a political tract by that name (with a passage explaining the title), but this is not mentioned in the movie.
  • As noted above, the last chapter (21) of the novel was not filmed. In this chapter, Alex encounters Pete, the third member of the original gang (who was heavily cut out of the film) who has grown beyond his violent ways and married; Alex realises that he wishes to do the same, but believes his violence was an unavoidable product of his youth. See also "Deleted Scenes" section below.
  • In the novel, the writer whose wife Alex rapes is named "F. Alexander", leading to a coincidental comparison between the two "Alexanders". The film does not mention his surname, though he is called "Mr. Alexander" in the credits. In the film, he is addressed by his first name, "Frank", a detail not revealed in the book. The writer is quite young in the novel, and elderly in the film. The novel is also very overt quite early about his being a political activist. This is strongly hinted at in the film by scattered clues, but not spelled out so clearly.
  • In the film, Alex's surname is spoken as "DeLarge" on arrival at prison; this surname is a pun based on an incident in the book, when Alex (referring to his penis) calls himself "Alexander the Large" (in turn a reference to Alexander the Great). In a close-up shot of multiple newspaper articles, Alex is identified as "Alex Burgess". In the novel, Alex's surname is unknown.
Changes in characterization and motivation
  • Alex's character in the film is more subtly manipulative, as illustrated in a few examples. In the novel, the incarcerated Alex and cell mates brutally beat a man just put in their cell, for being a nuisance. Alex accidentally kills him. For such persistent violence, Alex is selected to undergo the Ludovico Technique. However, in the film, Alex volunteers for the treatment and is chosen in part for his good behaviour in prison.
    Similarly, when Alex's parents visit him in the hospital, Alex threatens them with violence in the novel while in the film, he more subtly plays on their feelings of grief and guilt. Alex's behavior to the prison chaplain is similarly manipulative.
  • Critic Randy Rasmussen has argued that the government in the film is in a considerable shambles and in a state of desperation while the government in the novel is quite strong and self-confident. The former reflects Kubrick's broad preoccupation with the theme of acts of self-interest masked as simply following procedure.[22]
    One example of this would be subtle differences in the portrayal of P.R. Deltoid, Alex's "post-corrective advisor". In the novel, P.R. Deltoid appears to have some moral authority (although not enough to prevent Alex from lying to him or engaging in crime despite his protestations). In the film, Deltoid is a somewhat comical figure who inadvertently drinks from a glass holding dentures and, after delivering a morality lecture to Alex, punches the boy in his crotch.
  • In the film, the "cat lady" whose house Alex breaks into possesses a great deal of sexual artwork, including a rocking penis sculpture with which Alex delivers the (inadvertent) killing strike. None of this artwork is mentioned in the book. The "cat lady" in the novel is elderly, addled, and living in a cat-ridden house of Miss Havisham-style dilapidation; the "cat lady" in the movie is in her early 40s, sharp, and living in a health farm which (according to dialogue) has closed for a week.
Close-up of Beethoven's face. The image appears printed on a window shade in Alex Delarge's home
References to Beethoven
  • While Alex is being tortured by Mr. Alexander's playing of Beethoven on the stereo, Kubrick composes the shot so that the author is transformed into a bust of Beethoven. Even the arrangement of the scarf around his neck suggests the contours of a statuette.
  • In the film, when the Cat Lady assaults Alex, she holds a small bust of Beethoven, while Alex holds a large sculpted penis. In the novel, Alex wields a bust of Beethoven during their fight, while the Cat Lady is largely defenseless. Additionally, in the novel, Alex is attacked by the Cat Lady's cats as he tries to escape.
  • Alex is conditioned against all music in the book, but in the film he is only averse to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. During one of the applications of the Ludovico Technique, Beethoven's Fifth symphony is played, and Alex begs for them to stop. In the movie, it is the Ninth symphony which is played during this scene.
  • Conversely, while Alex appears to be conditioned only against rape by the Ludovico Technique in the book, he appears to be conditioned against all sexuality in the film.
"Deleted scenes" from the novel
  • Two of the attacks in the opening chapters of the novel—the assault on a library patron carrying rare books, and the strong-arm robbery of a shopkeeper and his wife—are not present in the film. On his commentary on the recent DVD edition of the film, Malcolm McDowell says the scenes were filmed but later discarded. Billy Russell, the actor playing the library patron, became ill after the initial production and was not available for the scenes in which Alex re-encounters his old victims.
  • In the novel, Alex and his gang buy drinks and snacks for a group of old ladies, bribing them into providing the police with an alibi to cover a crast (shop burglary). None of this appears in the film; the scene with the old ladies was shot, but not used.[23]
  • In the novel, Alex is beaten by prison guards. The film does not show this, but Alex mentions it in his narration.
Characters added to the film
  • In the novel, F. Alexander lives alone after the death of his wife, and manages most of the housework by himself despite his condition. In the film, he is shown to have hired a bodyguard named Julian to help him around the house and guard the home from future break-ins. The bodyguard is played by former bodybuilder and future Darth Vader, David Prowse in a brief role.
  • In the film Alex has a pet snake. There is no mention of this in the novel. This was added by Kubrick due to Malcolm McDowell's fear of snakes.[24]
Other differences
  • In the novel, Dr. Branom is a male. In the film, the character is female.
  • The film uses the futuristic slang language Nadsat somewhat less often than the book in order to make the film more accessible.
Changes in plot details (in chronological order)
  • In the film, Alex and his droogs beat a tramp, who later recognizes him and, with other homeless people, assaults him after his treatment. In the book, Alex beats an old man carrying library books, who later recognizes him and (with other aged people) assaults him in a library after his treatment. Alex and his droogs also beat a tramp in the book, but Alex does not encounter him again.
  • Alex's weapon of choice in the book is a britva (razor); in the film, he wields a cane with a knife concealed in the handle (similar to a Victorian London dagger cane).
  • The girl that is about to be raped by Billyboy's gang is ten in the book, but a young woman in the film.
  • In the film, the car seen before the home invasion is the M-505 Adams Brothers Probe 16, in the novel (and in the film's narration) however, it is referred to as Durango 95. Only three were produced. In the TV-program Top Gear (Season 2004, 2nd episode, aired 31 October 2004), the one used in the film was nominated for restoration in the Restoration Rip-off feature.
  • In the novel, Alex takes home and rapes two ten-year-old girls, Marty and Sonietta, after meeting them in a record shop. In the film, the girls are teenagers, and their sexual encounter with Alex appears to be (at least mostly) consensual. Also, in the book, Alex buys the girls ice cream and food prior to raping them, while this scene is not included in the film (though, in the film, the girls are shown slurping on popsicles at the record shop).
  • When trying to escape from the cat lady's house, Alex is stopped by Dim, who attacks him and leaves him for the police. In the novel, Dim uses his "oozy" (or chain) to whip Alex across the face. In the film, Dim smashes a milk bottle across the side of Alex's head.
  • In the novel, Alex's prisoner number is 6655321; in the film, it is 655321.
  • In the novel, an imprisoned Alex learns of the death of his former droog Georgie during a botched burglary. In the film, Alex meets with Georgie after being freed from prison (see below).
  • In the novel, Alex is beaten by his former droog, Dim, and his former rival, Billyboy, who have both joined the police. The beating itself is not described, though Alex subsequently notes soreness and several teeth knocked loose (he also believes himself to be covered with cuts and bruises). In the film, Billyboy is replaced in this scene by Georgie, another former droog (who had died in the novel); they take Alex down a wood path to a watering trough, where Dim forces Alex's head underwater, and Georgie beats him with his truncheon.
  • In the novel, F. Alexander recognises Alex through a number of careless references to the previous attack (e.g., his wife then claiming they did not have a telephone). In the film Alex is recognised when singing the song 'Singing in the Rain' in the bath, which he hauntingly had done whilst attacking F. Alexander's wife. The song does not appear at all in the book, as it was an improvisation by actor Malcolm McDowell when Kubrick complained that the rape scene was too "stiff".[25]
Kubrick film references

Soundtrack

A Clockwork Orange
Soundtrack by Wendy Carlos
Released 1972
Recorded 1971
Genre Electronic music
Label Columbia Records
Wendy Carlos chronology
Sonic Seasonings
(1972)
A Clockwork Orange
(1972)
Wendy Carlos' Clockwork Orange (1972)
The music is a thematic extension of Alex’s (and the viewer’s) psychological conditioning. The soundtrack of A Clockwork Orange comprises classical music and electronic synthetic music composed by Walter Carlos, a.k.a. Wendy Carlos. Some of the music is heard only as excerpts, e.g. Edward Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 (aka Land of Hope and Glory) ironically heralding a politician’s appearance at the prison. The main theme is an electronic transcription of Henry Purcell’s Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary, composed in 1695, for the procession of Queen Mary’s cortège through London en route to Westminster Abbey. “March from A Clockwork Orange” was the first recorded song featuring a vocoder for the singing; synthpop bands often cite it as their inspiration. Neither the end-credits, nor the soundtrack album, name the orchestra playing the Ninth Symphony excerpts, however, in Alex’s bedroom, there is a close-up of a microcassette tape labeled: Deutsche Grammophon – Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphonie Nr. 9 d-moll, op. 125 – Berliner Philharmoniker – Chor der St. Hedwigskathedrale – Ferenc Fricsay – Irmgard Seefried, Maureen Forrester, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Ernst Haefliger.
In the novel, Alex is conditioned against all classical music, but in the film, only against L.V. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, the soundtrack of a violent Ludovico Technique film. The audience do not see every violent film Alex is forced to view during Ludovico conditioning, yet the symphony’s fourth movement is heard. Later, using the symphony’s second movement, Mr Alexander, and fellow plotters, impel Alex to suicide by defenestration.
Track listing
  1. “The Funeral of Queen Mary”, Wendy Carlos [9]
  2. "The Thieving Magpie (Rossini, Abridged)", A Deutsche Grammophon Recording
  3. "Theme from A Clockwork Orange (Beethoviana)", Wendy Carlos
  4. "Ninth Symphony, Second Movement (Abridged)", A Deutsche Grammophon Recording conducted by Ferenc Fricsay.
  5. "March from A Clockwork Orange (Ninth Symphony, Fourth Movement, Abridged)", Wendy Carlos and Rachel Elkind
  6. "William Tell Overture (Rossini, Abridged)", Wendy Carlos
  7. "Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1", Sir Edward Elgar
  8. "Pomp and Circumstance March No. IV (Abridged)", Sir Edward Elgar
  9. "Timesteps (Excerpt)", Wendy Carlos
  10. "Overture to the Sun", Terry Tucker (instrumental from Sound of Sunforest [1969] album of the group, Sunforest)
  11. "I Want to Marry a Lighthouse Keeper", Erika Eigen (from Sound of Sunforest, the 1969 album of her group, Sunforest - the film version is different from the soundtrack version)
  12. "William Tell Overture (Abridged)", A Deutsche Grammophon Recording
  13. "Suicide Scherzo (Ninth Symphony, Second Movement, Abridged)", Wendy Carlos
  14. "Ninth Symphony, Fourth Movement, (Abridged)", A Deutsche Grammophon Recording (Von Karajan, 1963, uncredited)
  15. "Singin' in the Rain", Gene Kelly, lyrics by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown.

Second version

Three months after the official soundtrack's release, composer Wendy Carlos released Wendy Carlos's Clockwork Orange (1972) (Columbia KC 31480), a second version of the soundtrack containing unused cues and musical elements unheard in the film. For example, Kubrick used only part of “Timesteps”, and a short version of the synthesiser transcription of the Ninth Symphony’s Scherzo. The second soundtrack album contains a synthesiser version of Rossini's “La Gazza Ladra” (The Thieving Magpie); the film contains an orchestral version. In 1998, a digitally-remastered album edition, with tracks of the synthesiser music was released. It contains Carlos’s compositions, including those unused in the film, and the “Biblical Daydreams” and “Orange Minuet” cues excluded from the 1972 edition.
Carlos composed the first three minutes of “Timesteps” before reading the novel A Clockwork Orange. Originally intending it as the introduction to a vocoder rendition of the Ninth Symphony’s Choral movement; it was completed approximately when Kubrick completed the photography; “Timesteps” and the vocoder Ninth Symphony were the foundation for the Carlos–Kubrick collaboration.
Moreover, Stanley Kubrick asked Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters to use elements of the Atom Heart Mother suite. Waters refused when he found that Kubrick wanted the freedom to cut up the piece to fit the film.[26] Later, Waters asked Kubrick if he could use sounds from 2001: A Space Odyssey; Kubrick refused.[27]

Reuse of music

Wendy Carlos reused many of the musical motifs from this score (including the main themes by Purcell, Rossini, and Beethoven) in Clockwork Black, the 4th movement of her (1998) musical composition Tales of Heaven and Hell.

Awards and honors

  • BAFTA Awards
    • BAFTA Film Award Best Art Direction - John Barry
    • Best Cinematography - John Alcott
    • Best Direction - Stanley Kubrick
    • Best Film
    • Best Film Editing - William Butler
    • Best Screenplay - Stanley Kubrick
    • Best Sound Track - Brian Blamey, John Jordan, Bill Rowe
  • Golden Globes[28]
    • nominated 1972 Nominated Golden Globe Best Director: Motion Picture - Stanley Kubrick
    • nominated Best Motion Picture - Drama
    • nominated Best Motion Picture Actor: Drama - Malcolm McDowell
  • Writers Guild of America, United States
    • 1972 Nominated WGA Award (Screen) Best Drama Adapted from Another Medium - Stanley Kubrick

Home media releases

In 2000, the film was released on videotape and DVD, both individually and as part of The Stanley Kubrick Collection DVD set. Consequent to negative comments from fans, Warner Bros re-released the film, its image digitally restored and its soundtrack remastered. A limited-edition collector's set with a soundtrack disc, movie poster, booklet and film strip followed, but later was discontinued. In 2005, a British re-release, packaged as an "Iconic Film" in a limited-edition slipcase was published, identical to the remastered DVD set, except for different package cover art. In 2006, Warner Bros announced the September publication of a two-disc special edition featuring a Malcolm McDowell commentary, and the releases of other two-disc sets of Stanley Kubrick films. Several British retailers had set the release date as 6 November 2006; the release was delayed and re-announced for 2007 Holiday Season.
An HD DVD, Blu-ray, and DVD re-release version of the film was released on 23 October 2007. The release accompanies four other Kubrick classics. 1080p video transfers and remixed Dolby TrueHD 5.1 (for HD DVD) and uncompressed 5.1 PCM (for Blu-ray) audio tracks are on both the Blu-ray and HD DVD editions. Unlike the previous version, the DVD re-release edition is anamorphically enhanced.

Inspiration and Influence

In addition to many numerous references to A Clockwork Orange in popular culture, the clothing styles of many bands has been influenced by the film, and bars have used decor imitating the film. Actor Heath Ledger's interpretation of the Joker in the Batman film The Dark Knight was in its initial formative stages influenced by the character of Alex DeLarge.[29]

In popular culture

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ IMDb page
  2. ^ Both Burgess' novel and Stanley Kubrick's published movie script have this character's name as one word "Billyboy" although the Internet Movie Database lists him in the credits with two words "Billy Boy".
  3. ^ A general discussion of this question that references A Clockwork Orange can be found at [1]
  4. ^ Saturday Review, December 25, 1971
  5. ^ A review of the book which discusses Alex's role as a political pawn may be found at [2]
  6. ^ Film analysis at Collative Learning.com http://collativelearning.com/a%20clockwork%20orange%20review.html
  7. ^ "A Clockwork Orange: Context". sparknotes.com. http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/clockworkorange/context.html. 
  8. ^ [3]
  9. ^ [4]
  10. ^ [5]
  11. ^ Filming Locations Malcolmmcdowell.net, accessed 2007-07-22
  12. ^ "A Clockwork Orange Movie Reviews". Rotten Tomatos. http://au.rottentomatoes.com/m/clockwork_orange/. Retrieved 2010-01-16. 
  13. ^ Ebert, R: A Clockwork Orange, Chicago Sun-Times, 11 February 1972
  14. ^ Ian MacDonald, Revolution in the Head, Pimlico, p.235
  15. ^ "Article discussing the edits, with photographs". geocities.com. Archived from the original on 2009-10-23. http://www.webcitation.org/5kjLwkaI8. 
  16. ^ "Serious pockets of violence at London school, QC says", The Times, 21 March 1972.
  17. ^ “ ‘Clockwork Orange’ link with boy’s crime”, The Times, 4 July 1973.
  18. ^ [6]
  19. ^ "Scala's History". scala-london.co.uk. http://www.scala-london.co.uk/scala/scalashistory.php. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  20. ^ "Without Walls: Forbidden Fruit (1993) A Clockwork Orange BBC Special - Steven Berkoff". Archived from the original on 2009-10-23. http://www.webcitation.org/5kjLwLe8z. 
  21. ^ "The Kubrick FAQ Part 2". visual-memory.co.uk. http://www.visual-memory.co.uk/faq/index2.html#slot21. 
  22. ^ Kubrick: Seven Films Analyzed by Randy Rasmussen p. 112
  23. ^ "A Clockwork Orange (1971) Deleted, Cut Scenes and Outtake Pictures from the Film not on DVD". Archived from the original on 2009-10-23. http://www.webcitation.org/5kjLvwXr6. 
  24. ^ Stanley Kubrick by John Baxter p. 255
  25. ^ Stanley Kubrick by Vincent Lobrutto p. 365-6 and Stanley Kubrick, director by Alexander Walker, Sybil Taylor, Ulrich Ruchti p. 204
  26. ^ Blake, Mark (2007). Pigs Might Fly: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd. London, United Kingdom: Aurum Press Limited. p. 153. ISBN 978 1 84513 366 5. 
  27. ^ Blake, Mark (2007). Pigs Might Fly: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd. London, United Kingdom: Aurum Press Limited. p. 349. ISBN 978 1 84513 366 5. 
  28. ^ http://www.goldenglobes.org/browse/film/23471
  29. ^ [7][8]

Bibliography

  • Burgess, Anthony. 1978. "A Clockwork Orange". In his 1985[citation needed]. London: Hutchinson. ISBN 0-09-136080-3

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 film about a violent gang of teenagers in a futuristic Britain, whose leader is captured and given aversion therapy to combat his violent tendencies.^ A Clockwork Orange (1971) advertisement.
  • A Clockwork Orange (motion picture) - MSN Encarta 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]

^ Read more: A Clockwork Orange (film) .
  • A Clockwork Orange, Film - Evri 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.evri.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A Clockwork Orange film locations .

Written and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the novel by Anthony Burgess.
.
Being the adventures of a young man ...^ Plot Outline: The adventures of a young man who loved a bit of the old ultra-violence, went  to jail, was brainwashed and came out cured, or was he?
  • fUSION Anomaly. A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC fusionanomaly.net [Source type: General]

^ Alex, the sickeningly vibrant young man who we all despised somewhat at the beginning of the film, now an incapable being whom we all can do little but sympathise with.
  • A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.geocities.com [Source type: General]

^ Being the adventures of a young man whose principal interests are rape, ultra-violence and Beethoven.
  • Clockwork Orange, A (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tu-harburg.de [Source type: General]

who couldn't resist pretty girls ... or a bit of the old ultra-violence ... went to jail, was re-conditioned ... and came out a different young man ... or was he?
- taglines

Contents

Alex DeLarge

.
  • [voiceover] There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar trying to make up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening.^ The visually-brilliant film is narrated by Alex, the film's main hero/protagonist: Alex (voice-over): There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar trying to make up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ After a long night of "energy expenditure," the group returns to the Korova Milkbar where they are seen sprawling against its black walls: Alex (voice-over): We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it having been an evening of some small energy expenditure, O my brothers.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ He is leader of a small gang of thugs (Pete, Georgie and Dim), whom he calls his "droogs" (from the Russian word друг meaning "friend" or "buddy").
    • A Clockwork Orange, Film - Evri 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.evri.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .The Korova milkbar sold milk-plus, milk plus vellocet or synthemesc or drencrom, which is what we were drinking.^ The Korova milkbar sold milk-plus, milk plus vellocet or synthemesc or drencrom, which is what we were drinking.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ On a typical evening they'll stop by the Korova for some milk-plus, to sharpen them up, before venturing into the urban jungle.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.film.u-net.com [Source type: General]

    ^ In the Korova Milkbar, spiked, hallucinogenic drink concoctions (called "milk-plus") served from the nippled breasts of the coin-operated mannequins are automatically laced with drugs to alter their minds and get them ready for entertainment - a bit of "the old ultra-violence."
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .This would sharpen you up and make you ready for a bit of the old ultra-violence.
  • [voiceover] It was around by the derelict casino that we came across Billyboy and his four droogs.^ The leader, Billyboy (Richard Connaught) and his gang of droogs wear remnants of old Nazi uniforms: Alex (in voice-over): It was around by the derelict casino that we came across Billyboy and his four droogs.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ This would sharpen you up and make you ready for a bit of the old ultra-violence.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Sometimes gangs would gang up so as to make like malenky armies for big night-war, but mostly it was best to roam in these like small numbers."
    • A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.streettech.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They were getting ready to perform a little of the old in-out, in-out on a weepy young devotchka they had there.
  • Ho, ho, ho!^ There he spots a few "malchikis about to give a little devotchka a little of the old in-and-out .
    • Context Science Fiction: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.contextsf.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Plot Outline: The adventures of a young man who loved a bit of the old ultra-violence, went  to jail, was brainwashed and came out cured, or was he?
    • fUSION Anomaly. A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC fusionanomaly.net [Source type: General]

    ^ On this particular night they don't have to travel far for a spot of "ultraviolence"; a rival gang are about to force a bit of the "old in-out" on a helpless young devotchka (girl).
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.film.u-net.com [Source type: General]

    Well if it isn't fat stinking billy goat Billy Boy in poison! .How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap stinking chip oil?^ From the shadows, Alex and his gang observe the preparation for the rape, and then - preferring violence to sex, challenge them to a fight on the rubbish-strewn floor with a youthful, sexual insult: "How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap, stinking chip oil?
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Come and get one in the yarbles, if ya have any yarbles, ya eunuch jelly thou!
  • [voiceover] The Durango-95 purred away real horrorshow - a nice, warm, vibraty feeling all through your guttiwuts.^ "Come and get one in the yarbles, if ya have any yarble, ya eunuch jelly thou!"

    ^ Come and get one in the yarbles, if you have any yarbles, you eunich jelly thou."
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Driving at reckless speed in a rush toward the camera (with the sides of the road receding behind them), they play "chicken" with other vehicles, exhilarated by the panic and excitement of forcing other cars and drivers off the road: Alex (voice-over): The Durango-95 purred away real horrorshow - a nice, warm, vibraty feeling all through your guttiwuts.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Soon, it was trees and dark, my brothers, with real country dark.^ Soon, it was trees and dark, my brothers, with real country dark.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .We fillied around for a while with other travellers of the night, playing hogs of the road.^ We fillied around for a while with other travellers of the night, playing hogs of the road.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    Then we headed West. .What we were after now was the old surprise visit.^ Then we headed west, what we were after now was the old surprise visit.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .That was a real kick, and good for laughs and lashings of the old ultra-violence.
  • Viddy well, little brother.^ Viddy well, my brothers, viddy well.
    • DVD Review - A Clockwork Orange (all versions) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.thedigitalbits.com [Source type: General]

    ^ That was a real kick and good for laughs and lashings of the old ultra-violence.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Plot Outline: The adventures of a young man who loved a bit of the old ultra-violence, went  to jail, was brainwashed and came out cured, or was he?
    • fUSION Anomaly. A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC fusionanomaly.net [Source type: General]

    .Viddy well.
  • [voiceover] We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it having been an evening of some small energy expenditure, O my brothers.^ After a long night of "energy expenditure," the group returns to the Korova Milkbar where they are seen sprawling against its black walls: Alex (voice-over): We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it having been an evening of some small energy expenditure, O my brothers.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Viddy well, my brothers, viddy well.
    • DVD Review - A Clockwork Orange (all versions) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.thedigitalbits.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Viddy well my Droogies.
    • A . Clockwork Orange Quizzes and Trivia -- Fun Trivia 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .So we got rid of the auto and stopped off at the Korova for a nightcap.
  • [voiceover] And it was like for a moment, O my brothers, some great bird had flown into the milkbar and I felt all the malenky little hairs on my plott standing endwise and the shivers crawling up like slow malenky lizards and then down again.^ For Alex, it is a moment of pure ecstasy: Alex (voice-over): And it was like for a moment, O my brothers, some great bird had flown into the milkbar and I felt all the malenky little hairs on my plott standing endwise and the shivers crawling up like slow malenky lizards and then down again.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ So we got rid of the auto and stopped off at the Korova for a nightcap.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ After a long night of "energy expenditure," the group returns to the Korova Milkbar where they are seen sprawling against its black walls: Alex (voice-over): We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it having been an evening of some small energy expenditure, O my brothers.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Because I knew what she sang.^ Because I knew what she sang.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .It was a bit from the glorious Ninth, by Ludwig van.
  • It had been a wonderful evening and what I needed now, to give it the perfect ending, was a little of the Ludwig Van.
  • [While listening to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony] Oh bliss!^ Quote Alex (listening to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony): “Oh bliss!
    • A Clockwork Orange (motion picture) - MSN Encarta 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ As "the perfect ending" to the "wonderful evening," Alex switches on a cassette tape of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ It was a bit from the glorious Ninth, by Ludwig van.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    Bliss and heaven! .Oh, it was gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh.^ Oh, it was gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh.
    • A Clockwork Orange (motion picture) - MSN Encarta 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Oh, it was gorgeousness and gorgeosity made flesh.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .It was like a bird of rarest-spun heaven metal or like silvery wine flowing in a spaceship, gravity all nonsense now.^ It was like a bird of rarest-spun heaven metal or like silvery wine flowing in a spaceship, gravity all nonsense now.
    • A Clockwork Orange (motion picture) - MSN Encarta 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It was like a bird of rarest spun heaven metal, or like silvery wine flowing in a space ship, gravity all nonsense now.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ As our favorite Droog would say: "It was like a bird of rarest spun metal, or like silvery wine flowing in a space ship, gravity all nonsense now."
    • Clockwork Orange (1971) - Stanley Kubrick 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.jahsonic.com [Source type: General]

    .As I slooshied, I knew such lovely pictures!
  • Appy-polly-loggies.^ As I slooshied I knew such lovely pictures."
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ As I slooshied, I knew such lovely pictures!” .
    • A Clockwork Orange (motion picture) - MSN Encarta 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Read my mind Flag as inappropriate Adult Reviewer appy polly loggi ...

    I had something of a pain in my gulliver so I had to sleep. .I was not awakened when I gave orders for awakening.
  • A bit cold and pointless, isn't it, my lovely?^ After hunting around and inquiring about an order, he asks the pop-sucking little sisters: "A bit cold and pointless, isn't it, my lovely?"
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .What you got back home, little sister, to play your fuzzy warbles on?^ What you got back home, little sister, to play your fuzzy warbles on?
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ That's why I'm warning you, little Alex, to keep your handsome young proboscis out of the dirt.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ With a little info about you and your family, you'll get the most out of our site.

    .I bet you got little save pitiful portable picnic players.^ I bet you got little save pitiful portable picnic players.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Come with uncle and hear all proper.^ Come with uncle and hear all proper.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Hear angel trumpets and devil trombones.^ Hear angel trumpets and devil trombones.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .You are invited.
  • [voiceover] As we walked along the flatblock marina, I was calm on the outside but thinking all the time.^ They walk along the flatblock marina to the bar, in graceful slow-motion (in striking contrast to the high-speed orgy scene previously): Alex (voice-over): As we walked along the flatblock marina, I was calm on the outside but thinking all the time.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .So now it was to be Georgie the General, saying what we should do, and what not to do, and Dim as his mindless, grinning bulldog.^ So now it was to be Georgie the General, saying what we should do, and what not to do, and Dim as his mindless, grinning bulldog.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Now then, Dim, what does that great big horsy gape of a grin portend?
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .But, suddenly, I viddied that thinking was for the gloopy ones, and that the oomny ones used like inspiration and what Bog sends.^ But, suddenly, I viddied that thinking was for the gloopy ones, and that the oomny ones used like inspiration and what Bog sends.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ At the same time, I don't believe anyone leaves the theatre thinking Richard III or Alex are the sort of people one admires and would wish to be like.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .For now it was lovely music that came to my aid.^ For now it was lovely music that came to my aid.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .There was a window open, with a stereo on, and I viddied right at once what to do.
  • [voiceover] I had not cut into any of Dim's main cables and so, with the help of a clean tashtook, the red, red krovvy soon stopped, and it did not take long to quieten the two wounded soldiers, down in the snug of the Duke of New York.^ There was a window open, with a stereo on, and I viddied right at once what to do.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ A key piece of the information leading to this terror alert was fabricated, according to two senior law enforcement officials in Washington and New York.

    ^ There are no abrupt or jagged transitions, and the director's penchant for long, unbroken takes is in evidence.
    • Review: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.reelviews.net [Source type: General]

    .Now they knew who was Master and Leader.^ They have become policemen , who now direct their violent rage against criminal s.
    • Context Science Fiction: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.contextsf.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Did Spartacus lose control of his leaders who by now may have been more interested in the spoils of war than in freedom?
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .Sheep, thought I, but a real leader knows always when like to give and show generous to his unders.
  • Initiative comes to thems that wait.
  • Hi-hi-hi-hi there!^ You know there's something wrong with a movie when the last third feels like the last half.
    • A Clockwork Orange Info, Trailers, and Reviews at MovieTome 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.movietome.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "Well, many aspects of liberal mythology are coming to grief now--but I don't want to give any examples or I'm going to sound like William Buckley..."
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    Naughty, naughty, naughty. You filthy old soomka.
  • I'm blind, you bastards. I'm blind. I'm blind, you bastards. I can't see. O, you bastards! I'm blind!
  • This is the real weepy and like tragic part of the story beginning. O my brothers and only friends. .After a trial with judges and a jury, and some very hard words spoken against your friend and humble narrator, he was sentenced to fourteen years in Staja No.^ Your humble narrator and friend, MALCOLM McDOWELL London.
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    ^ The narration is very good and even the most vile of scenes are spoken like they are nothing special.
    • Math.com Store: Math Books: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC store.math.com [Source type: General]

    ^ There's been some very large talk behind my sleeping back, and no error.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .84F, among smelly perverts and hardened prestoopnicks, the shock sending my dadda beating his bruised and krovvy rookers against unfair Bog in his Heaven, and my mum boohoohooing in her mother's grief, at her only child and son of her bosom like letting everybody down real horrowshow.
  • [voiceover] It had not been edifying, indeed not, being in this hellhole and human zoo for two years now, being kicked and tolchocked by brutal warders, and meeting leering criminals and perverts, ready to dribble all over a luscious young malchick like your storyteller.
  • [voiceover] It was my rabbit to help the prison charlie (chaplain) with the Sunday service.^ Hope you do real horrowshow like.
    • A . Clockwork Orange Quizzes and Trivia -- Fun Trivia 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Sending him to borstal, the judge said: "Cases like yours present, in my view, an unassailable argument in favour of the return as quickly as possible of some sort of censorship to prevent this sort of exhibition being released on the screen or stage, which is evil in itself.
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    ^ The dehumanising prison system, which even labels Alex with a concentration camp style number instead of a name, and it's "brutal warders" are equally as cruel as Alex in that they crush the human spirit and demand conformity.
    • A CLOCKWORK ORANGE analysis by Rob Ager 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.collativelearning.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .He was a bolshy great burly bastard, but he was very fond of myself, me being very young, and also now very interested in the big book.
  • [voiceover] I read all about the scourging and the crowning with thorns and I could viddy myself helping in and even taking charge of the tolchocking and the nailing in, being dressed in the height of Roman fashion.^ Language ceases to be an opaque protection against being appalled and takes a very secondary place.
    • Anthony Burgess from A Clockwork Orange: A play with music (CenturyHutchinson Ltd, 1987) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC pers-www.wlv.ac.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And of course by the time a government could do that, we'd no longer be perusing books by Burgess or anyone else; we wouldn't care either because we would all have . . .
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Billed as "being the adventure of a young man whose principal interests are rape, ultra-violence and Beethoven", it was clear this would be no ordinary film.
    • The Kubrick Site: The ACO Controversy in the UK 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I didn't so much like the latter part of the book, which is more like all preachy talking than fighting and the old in-out.^ PART 1: More than meets the eye .

    ^ Having said all that, I should warn that like the majority of older tracks remixed for surround sound, the rear channels in 'A Clockwork Orange' seem to be more of a novelty here than they are a genuine element of the soundfield.
    • Blu-ray Review: A Clockwork Orange | High-Def Digest 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC bluray.highdefdigest.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I liked the parts where these old yahoodies tolchock each other and then drink their Hebrew vino, and getting onto the bed with their wives' handmaidens.^ For the most part, these paintings are drab, like Alex’s parents, and resemble paintings one might purchase at a flea market.
    • SparkNotes: A Clockwork Orange: Themes, Motifs, and Symbols 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.sparknotes.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It's a stinking world because it lets the young get onto the old, like you done.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    That kept me going.
  • [voiceover] And viddy films, I would. Where I was taken to, brothers, was like no sinny I ever viddied before. I was bound up in a straitjacket and my gulliver was strapped to a headrest with like wires running away from it. .Then they clamped like lidlocks on my eyes so that I could not shut them no matter how hard I tried.^ As far as I can tell, no hard evidence has emerged to support this assassination idea, but its interesting that to this date there has been no release of an Eyes Wide Shut directors cut.
    • A CLOCKWORK ORANGE analysis by Rob Ager 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.collativelearning.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    It seemed a bit crazy to me, but I let them get on with what they wanted to get on with. .If I was to be a free young malchick again in a fortnight's time, I would put up with much in the meantime, O my brothers.^ When I read the reviews prior to my purchase I thought the made-up words would be limited, but in fact there were very many of them.
    • Math.com Store: Math Books: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC store.math.com [Source type: General]

    ^ McDowell's portrayal of a vicious young hood up against a system every bit as cruel is what draws me in, and keeps drawing me in, time and again.

    ^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .So far, the first film was a very good, professional piece of sinny, like it was done in Hollywood.^ It's a very good film all the same.

    ^ While thematic content and plot form the unshakable foundations of a film like this, it's style that elevates it from the level of a thought-provoking piece to a genuine classic.
    • Review: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.reelviews.net [Source type: General]

    ^ The narration is very good and even the most vile of scenes are spoken like they are nothing special.
    • Math.com Store: Math Books: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC store.math.com [Source type: General]

    The sounds were real horrorshow. .You could slooshy the screams and moans very realistic, and you could even get the heavy breathing and panting of the tolchocking malchicks at the same time.^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ We're subjected to the very same treatment used on Alex, and Kubrick pins your eyes open and tells you this will hurt.

    .And then, what do you know, soon our dear old friend, the red, red vino on tap, the same in all places like it's put out by the same big firm, began to flow.^ It was like a bird of rarest spun heaven metal, or like silvery wine flowing in a space ship, gravity all nonsense now.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Please use our tips form to let us know, and we'll credit you with the find.
    • Blu-ray Review: A Clockwork Orange | High-Def Digest 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC bluray.highdefdigest.com [Source type: General]

    ^ More, badness is of the self, the one, the you or me on our oddy knockies, and that self is made by old Bog or God and is his great pride and radosty.
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    It was beautiful. .It's funny how the colors of the real world only seem really real when you viddy them on the screen.^ Although a fiction film, Donnie Darko seems to suggest a strong connection with how we experience (parts of) our real world.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ During the two weeks that doctors show Alex reel upon reel of sex and violence, he is amazed that the real world looks even more real on a television screen.
    • SparkNotes: A Clockwork Orange: Themes, Motifs, and Symbols 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.sparknotes.com [Source type: General]

    .Now all the time I was watching this, I was beginning to get very aware of like not feeling all that well, and this I put down to all the rich food and vitamins, but I tried to forget this, concentrating on the next film which jumped right away on a young devotchka who was being given the old in-out, in-out first by one malchick, then another, then another...When it came to the sixth or seventh malchick, leering and smecking and then going into it, I began to feel really sick.^ All material on this site is © Time Out.
    • A Clockwork Orange Review. Movie Reviews - Film - Time Out London 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.timeout.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ And what we must fight for right now is the beginning of a very new reality.

    ^ Oh, nobody can prove anything about anybody as usual, but I'm warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    But I could not shut my glazzies. .And even if I tried to move my glazz-balls about, I still could not get out of the line of fire of this picture.
  • [voiceover] It was the next day, brothers, and I had truly done my best, morning and afternoon, to play it their way and sit, like a horrorshow co-operative malchick, in the chair of torture, while they flashed nasty bits of ultra-violence on the screen.^ After a long night of "energy expenditure," the group returns to the Korova Milkbar where they are seen sprawling against its black walls: Alex (voice-over): We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it having been an evening of some small energy expenditure, O my brothers.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ I'm talking about major innovations in form, not about quality, content, or ideas, and in this respect I think my films are still not very far from the traditional form and structure which has moved sideways since the beginning of sound.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Plot Outline: The adventures of a young man who loved a bit of the old ultra-violence, went  to jail, was brainwashed and came out cured, or was he?
    • fUSION Anomaly. A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC fusionanomaly.net [Source type: General]

    Though not on the soundtrack, my brothers. The only sound being music. .Then I noticed in all my pain and sickness what music it was that like cracked and boomed - it was Ludwig van - Ninth Symphony, fourth movement.
  • You've proved to me that all this ultra-violence and killing is wrong, wrong, and terribly wrong.^ Ludwig van Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony .
    • SparkNotes: A Clockwork Orange: Themes, Motifs, and Symbols 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.sparknotes.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It was a bit from the glorious Ninth, by Ludwig van.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Very strange look at the future of crime, punishment, rehabilitation and all the ultra-violence.
    • Math.com Store: Math Books: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC store.math.com [Source type: General]

    I've learned my lesson, sir. .I see now what I've never seen before.^ I have never seen before.
    • A Clockwork Orange Info, Trailers, and Reviews at MovieTome 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.movietome.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    I'm cured, praise God!...I see that it's wrong! It's wrong because it's like against society. .It's wrong because everybody has the right to live and be happy without being tolchocked and knifed.
  • [voiceover] And, O my brothers, would you believe your faithful friend and long suffering narrator pushed out his red yahzik a mile-and-a-half to lick the grahzny, vonny boots...The horrible killing sickness had whooshed up, and turned the like joy of battle into a feeling I was going to snuff it.
  • [voiceover] She came towards me with the light like it was the like light of heavenly grace, and the first thing that flashed into my gulliver was that I'd like to have her right down there on the floor with the old in-out, real savage.^ You know there's something wrong with a movie when the last third feels like the last half.
    • A Clockwork Orange Info, Trailers, and Reviews at MovieTome 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.movietome.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Although doctors believed these procedures would truly relieve the suffering of their patients, the government also hoped the procedures would reduce overcrowding in state-run psychiatric hospitals.
    • SparkNotes: A Clockwork Orange: Context 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.sparknotes.com [Source type: General]

    ^ When I read the reviews prior to my purchase I thought the made-up words would be limited, but in fact there were very many of them.
    • Math.com Store: Math Books: A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC store.math.com [Source type: General]

    But as quick as a shot came the sickness, like a detective that had been watching around the corner and now followed to make his arrest.
  • [to his Mum and Dad] Right, I'm leaving now. .You won't ever viddy me no more.^ And I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be...Yarbles, great bolshy yarblockos to you.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ I hope this wasn't more than you were looking for, and feel free to call me on my shit if you disagree- I'm no expert.
    • Renn's Blogs [Archive] - CHUD Forums 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC chud.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    I'll make me own way. .Thank you very much.^ So A Clockwork Orange was very much forbidden fruit, plus you had to be 18 to see it.
    • A Clockwork Orange - Britmovie - British Film Forum 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.britmovie.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Renn Brown 07-08-2009, 01:15 AM Thanks Phil, I appreciate you reading the review, much more for commenting on it.
    • Renn's Blogs [Archive] - CHUD Forums 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC chud.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Let it lie heavy on your consciences.
  • [voiceover] Then there was like a sea of dirty smelly old men, trying to get at your Humble Narrator, with their feeble rookers and horny old claws.^ Your humble narrator and friend, MALCOLM McDOWELL London.
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    ^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .It was old age having a go at youth, and I daren't do a single, solitary thing, O my brothers, it being better to be hit at like that than want to sick and feel that horrible pain.
  • [voiceover] Where was I to go, who had no home and no money?^ Oh, nobody can prove anything about anybody as usual, but I'm warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Having heard so many things about this film, I didn't know if I was gonna like it just because it's one of the best or because of my own feelings.
    • Clockwork Orange, A Script at IMSDb. 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.imsdb.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Super-Ego thing going on, so you can just say I'm a douche who likes to think he's a kingpin cardshark.* *Any night at Smoker's Paradise playing hold 'em with Nick, Sweeney, & Co.
    • Renn's Blogs [Archive] - CHUD Forums 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC chud.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    I cried for myself. Home, home, home. It was home I was wanting and it was Home I came to, brothers, not realizing in the state I was in, where I was and had been before. And would you believe it. .O my brothers and only friends there was your Faithful Narrator being held helpless, like a babe in arms, and suddenly realizing where he was and why 'Home' on the gate had looked so familiar.^ Soon, it was trees and dark, my brothers, with real country dark.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Clockwork Orange is real horrorshow my brothers.
    • A Clockwork Orange HOTList: The hottest A Clockwork Orange page - HOT or NOT 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.hotornot.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Your humble narrator and friend, MALCOLM McDOWELL London.
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    But I knew I was safe. I knew he would not remember me. .For in those carefree days, I and my so-called droogs wore our maskies, which were like real horrorshow disguises.
  • I can't listen to the Ninth anymore at all.^ Yet ,while it's clearly one of the key films of this era, A Clockwork Orange is not really like any of those other movies.
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I first saw it when I was about thirteen and to this day it remains my favourite movie of all time.
    • Clockwork Orange, A Script at IMSDb. 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.imsdb.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Clockwork Orange is real horrorshow my brothers.
    • A Clockwork Orange HOTList: The hottest A Clockwork Orange page - HOT or NOT 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.hotornot.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .When I hear the Ninth, I get like this funny feeling and then, all I can think about is like trying to snuff it...death, I mean...I just want to die peacefully, like, with no pain.
  • [voiceover] I woke up.^ When I say I'm a total amateur I mean totally, like it's just cutting family or travel stuff I shoot on my cheapo dv camera, but being a film dork I like to try and pay attention to proffesional techniques.
    • Renn's Blogs [Archive] - CHUD Forums 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC chud.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Having heard so many things about this film, I didn't know if I was gonna like it just because it's one of the best or because of my own feelings.
    • Clockwork Orange, A Script at IMSDb. 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.imsdb.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ In this first pair of lectures, we aim to get you thinking about how images make meanings.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    The pain and sickness all over me like an animal. Then I realized what it was. .The music coming up from the floor was our old friend, Ludwig van, and the dreaded Ninth Symphony.
  • [voiceover] Suddenly, I viddied what I had to do, and what I had wanted to do, and that was to do myself in; to snuff it, to blast off for ever out of this wicked, cruel world.^ Ludwig van Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony .
    • SparkNotes: A Clockwork Orange: Themes, Motifs, and Symbols 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.sparknotes.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Why did Kubrick have Alex's little afternoon orgy tricked out with speeded-up motion, the William Tell Overture comically blasting over it?
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The boy told the police that his friends had told him about the film "and the beating up of an old boy like this one".
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    One moment of pain perhaps and, then, sleep for ever, and ever and ever.
  • [voiceover] I jumped, O my brothers, and I fell hard, but I did not snuff it. If I had snuffed it, I would not be here to tell what I have told. .I came back to life, after a long black, black gap of what might have been a million years.
  • Well, like all these doctors were playing around with my gulliver, you know, like the inside of my brain.^ You might as well have done it!
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Having heard so many things about this film, I didn't know if I was gonna like it just because it's one of the best or because of my own feelings.
    • Clockwork Orange, A Script at IMSDb. 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.imsdb.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Like the astronaut of 2001 , Alex is reborn ("I came back to life after black, black night for what might have been a million years") and, restored to rude health, prepares to make up for lost time.

    I seemed to have this dream over and over again.
  • Do you know what you can do with that watch? - .Stick it up your arse.
  • No time for the old in-out, love, I've just come to read the meter.
  • Eggiwegs!^ I'd love to include any you can come up with!
    • Renn's Blogs [Archive] - CHUD Forums 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC chud.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I've been out of the rookers of the millicents for a long time now.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    I would like... to smash them!
  • I have suffered the tortures of the damned, sir.
  • [last line of the film] I was cured all right.

Mr. Deltoid

.
  • You watch out, little Alex, because next time it's not going to be the Corrective School anymore.^ After having Alex sit on the bed next to him, he affectionately puts his arm around Alex's bare shoulders and speaks to him in the Nadsat lingo of youth: ...you watch out, little Alex, because next time it's not going to be the Corrective School anymore.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ That's why I'm warning you, little Alex, to keep your handsome young proboscis out of the dirt.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ The teen-aged boys, wearing zoned-out, pathological expressions on their faces and assuming arrogant poses, are preparing to go on a rampage led by Alex.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Next time, it's going to be the barry place and all my work ruined.^ Next time, it's going to be the barry place and all my work ruined.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ I first saw it when I was about thirteen and to this day it remains my favourite movie of all time.
    • Clockwork Orange, A Script at IMSDb. 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.imsdb.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I have to live where I make my films and, as it has worked out, I have spent most of my time during the last 10 years in London."
    • The Clockwork Orange Files 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.tabula-rasa.info [Source type: General]

    .If you've no respect for your horrible self, you at least might have some for me who's sweated over you.^ Can you at this stage see any reasons why you might find some more persuasive or attractive than others?
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ You’ve taken away the Orange, and we are no longer afraid.?

    ^ Well, don't you think that your films might be called original?
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .A big black mark, I tell you, for every one we don't reclaim.^ A big black mark, I tell you, for every one we don't reclaim.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ A confession of failure for every one of you who ends up in the stripy hole.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .A confession of failure for every one of you who ends up in the stripy hole.
  • This is the end of the line for me, Alex.
  • You are now a murderer, little Alex.^ A confession of failure for every one of you who ends up in the stripy hole.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Oh, nobody can prove anything about anybody as usual, but I'm warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ That's why I'm warning you, little Alex, to keep your handsome young proboscis out of the dirt.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    A murderer...I've just come from the hospital. Your victim has died...It will be your own torture. I hope to God it will torture you to madness.

Minister

  • Excellent. He's enterprising, aggressive, outgoing, young, bold, vicious. He'll do...He's perfect. I want his records sent to me. .This vicious young hoodlum will be transformed out of all recognition.
  • As I was saying, Alex, you can be instrumental in changing the public verdict.^ That's why I'm warning you, little Alex, to keep your handsome young proboscis out of the dirt.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Kubrick has assumed the deformed, self-righteous perspective of a vicious young punk who says, 'Everything's rotten.
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When you put all these elements together it is plain to see that Alex DeLarge is a product of a decadent society.
    • A CLOCKWORK ORANGE analysis by Rob Ager 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.collativelearning.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Do you understand, Alex? .Have I made myself clear?
  • Tomorrow, we send him out with confidence into the world again, as decent a lad as you would meet on a May morning.^ Freud said this was because he was afraid of the popular superstition that if you meet your Doppelgänger (double) you would die.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You may find it useful to set out the main, analytic part of your essay like a report (with numbers or headings to separate your segment into bits for purpose of close examination.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .What a change is here, ladies and gentlemen, from the wretched hoodlum the State committed to unprofitable punishment some two years ago.^ (A report bearing all the marks of these questions came out two years ago – it was called Making Movies Matter .
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Unchanged after two years. Unchanged, do I say? - not quite. Prison taught him the false smile, the rubbed hand of hypocrisy, the fawning, greased obsequious leer. .Other vices it taught him, as well as confirming in those he had long practiced before.^ On the other hand, the distorted image is for Alexander, the reflection of the nightmarish scene taking place before him.

    .Our party promised to restore law and order and to make the streets safe again for the ordinary peace-loving citizen.^ The minister of the interior argues that government should have the power to bring law and order to the streets, and that questions of individual liberty are insignificant compared with the values of safety and order.
    • SparkNotes: A Clockwork Orange: Themes, Motifs, and Symbols 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.sparknotes.com [Source type: General]

    This pledge is now about to become a reality. Ladies and gentlemen, today is an historic moment. The problem of criminal violence is soon to be a thing of the past. But enough of words. Actions speak louder than. Action now. .Observe all.
  • Our subject is impelled towards the good by paradoxically being impelled towards evil.^ He's paradoxically a cultured barbarian, which is what Kubrick is accusing us all of being.

    The intention to act violently is accompanied by strong feelings of physical distress. To counter these, the subject has to switch to a diametrically opposed attitude. Any questions?

Dr. Brodsky

  • Very soon now, the drug will cause the subject to experience a death-like paralysis, together with deep feelings of terror and helplessness. .One of our early test subjects described it as being like death, a sense of stifling or drowning, and it is during this period we have found that the subject will make his most rewarding associations between his catastrophic experience-environment and the violence he sees.
  • [to Alex] Violence is a very horrible thing.^ One of these reasons, very much at the centre of contemporary debate, is how films relate to our world.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The scene is one of the most disturbing scenes in the film, with its juxtaposition of the familiar lyrics of playful music from a classic film with slapstick comedy, brutality and horrible ultra-violence: I'm singin' in the rain, Just singin' in the rain...
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ What's become of Alex in the course of time is rather like what's happened to some of the mythical characters of Shakespeare, to follow up on Kubrick's way of seeing him.
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    .That's what you're learning now.^ You're about due now by my reckoning.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    .Your body is learning it...You felt ill this afternoon because you're getting better.^ Freud said this was because he was afraid of the popular superstition that if you meet your Doppelgänger (double) you would die.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We're subjected to the very same treatment used on Alex, and Kubrick pins your eyes open and tells you this will hurt.

    ^ I find that, with very few exceptions, it's important to save your cinematic ideas until you have rehearsed the scene in the actual place you're going to film it.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    You see, when we are healthy, we respond to the presence of the hateful with fear and nausea. You're becoming healthy, that's all. By this time tomorrow, you'll be healthier still.

Joe

.
  • I've heard about you.^ After you've been working on a film, perhaps for more than a year, everything about it tends to become so familiar that you are in danger of not seeing the forest for the trees.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    I know what you've done. Breaking the hearts of your poor grieving parents. So you're back, eh? .You're back to make life a misery for your lovely parents once more, is that it?
  • You've been like a father and mother to me.^ And I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be...Yarbles, great bolshy yarblockos to you.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ You've got a good home here, good loving parents, you've got not too bad of a brain.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ After you've been working on a film, perhaps for more than a year, everything about it tends to become so familiar that you are in danger of not seeing the forest for the trees.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .Well, it wouldn't be fair now or right, I mean, for me to go off and leave you two to the tender mercies of this young monster, who's been like no real son at all.^ And of course by the time a government could do that, we'd no longer be perusing books by Burgess or anyone else; we wouldn't care either because we would all have . . .
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When you can write a book like that, you've really done something.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you've no respect for your horrible self, you at least might have some for me who's sweated over you.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    Look, he's weeping now. But that's all his craft and artfulness. Let him go and find a room somewhere else. .Let him learn the errors of his way, and that a bad boy like he's been doesn't deserve such a good mum and dad as he's had...You've made others suffer.^ This lecture will not be as closely connected to the screening as some others, as its point will be to encourage you to think about the ways in which film analysts attend to the films they study.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ What's become of Alex in the course of time is rather like what's happened to some of the mythical characters of Shakespeare, to follow up on Kubrick's way of seeing him.
    • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You've got a good home here, good loving parents, you've got not too bad of a brain.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    It's only right that you should suffer proper.

Mr. Alexander

  • I know you! Isn't it your picture in the newspapers? Didn't I see you on the video this morning? Are you not the poor victim of this horrible new technique?
  • Recruiting brutal young roughs into the police, proposing debilitating and will-sapping techniques of conditioning. Oh, we've seen it all before in other countries. The thin end of the wedge. Before we know where we are, we shall have the full apparatus of totalitarianism. This young boy is a living witness to these diabolical proposals. .The people - the common people - must know, must see.^ 'The common people must be led, driven, pushed!'
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    There are great traditions of liberty to defend. The tradition of liberty is all. .The common people will let it go.^ Since Aristotle's day, it is common knowledge that people go to public entertainments to purge their baser instincts, and they return home calmer.
    • The Kubrick Site: The ACO Controversy in the UK 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Oh yes. They will sell liberty for a quieter life - that is why they must be led, sir, driven, pushed!!

Others

  • Policeman: [to Deltoid] If you'd care to give him a bash in the chops, sir, don't mind us. We'll hold him down. .He must be a great disappointment to you, sir.
  • Chief Guard: [to Alex] You are now 655321, and it is your duty to memorize that number.
  • Chaplain: What's it going to be then?^ That's why I'm warning you, little Alex, to keep your handsome young proboscis out of the dirt.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ And I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be...Yarbles, great bolshy yarblockos to you.
    • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

    ^ For your second answer, you will be able to choose from a number of questions which will relate to the broad issues and reading of the module.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Is it going to be in and out of institutions like this, though more in than out for most of you?^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ After you've been working on a film, perhaps for more than a year, everything about it tends to become so familiar that you are in danger of not seeing the forest for the trees.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Can you at this stage see any reasons why you might find some more persuasive or attractive than others?
    • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Or are you going to attend to the Divine Word and realize the punishments that await unrepentant sinners in the next world as well as this? A lot of idiots you are, selling your birthright for a saucer of cold porridge, the thrill of theft, of violence, the urge to live easy. Well, I ask you, what is it worth? When we have undeniable proof, yes, incontrovertible evidence that Hell exists. I know, I know, my friends. I have been informed in visions that there is a place darker than any prison, hotter than any flame of human fire, where souls of unrepentant criminal sinners like yourselves. Don't you laugh, damn you, don't you laugh. I say like yourselves, scream in endless and unendurable agony. Their skin rotting and peeling, a fireball spinning in their screaming guts. .I know, oh yes, I know.
  • Prison Governor: The new ridiculous ideas have come at last and orders are orders...The new view is that we turn the bad into good.^ The prison warder, played by the late Michael Bates, is an obsolete servant of the new order.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It seemed to me a good way to satirize what had become the fairly common use of slow-motion to solemnize this sort of thing, and turn it into 'art.'
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Alex exercises his freedom to be a vicious thug until the State turns him into a harmless zombie no longer able to choose between good and evil.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .All of which seems to me to be grossly unjust...You are to be reformed.
  • Tramp: This is the poisonous young swine that near done me in.^ In your films, you seem to be critical of all political factions.
    • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    Him and his friends, they beat me and kicked me and punched me. Stop him, stop him. They laughed at my blood and my moans. This murderous young pig.

Dialogue

.Alex: [voiceover] One thing I could never stand was to see a filthy, dirty old drunkie, howling away at the filthy songs of his fathers and going blerp, blerp in between, as it might be a filthy old orchestra in his stinking rotten guts.^ The "filthy, dirty old drunkie" taunts them and is severely beaten after masochistically bemoaning the state of affairs in the present society - "a stinking world" where the young show no respect for the elderly: Alex (voice-over): One thing I could never stand was to see a filthy, dirty old drunkie, howling away at the filthy songs of his fathers and going blerp, blerp in between, as it might be a filthy old orchestra in his stinking rotten guts.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ I could never stand to see anyone like that, whatever his age might be, but more especially when he was real old like this one was.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ What I mean is that the audience — never told precisely where they stand in relation to what goes on — projects its own subconscious feelings onto what Kubrick dramatizes through Alex.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

.I could never stand to see anyone like that, whatever his age might be, but more especially when he was real old like this one was.^ I could never stand to see anyone like that, whatever his age might be, but more especially when he was real old like this one was.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ The "filthy, dirty old drunkie" taunts them and is severely beaten after masochistically bemoaning the state of affairs in the present society - "a stinking world" where the young show no respect for the elderly: Alex (voice-over): One thing I could never stand was to see a filthy, dirty old drunkie, howling away at the filthy songs of his fathers and going blerp, blerp in between, as it might be a filthy old orchestra in his stinking rotten guts.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ Yet ,while it's clearly one of the key films of this era, A Clockwork Orange is not really like any of those other movies.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

[The boys stop and applaud the Tramp's singing]
.Tramp: Can you spare some cutter, me brothers?^ (The boys stop and applaud the Tramp's singing) Tramp: Can you spare some cutter, me brothers?
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

[Alex rams his club into the tramp's stomach]
.Tramp: Go on, do me in, you bastard cowards.^ (Alex rams his club into the tramp's stomach) Go on, do me in, you bastard cowards.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.I don't want to live anyway...not in a stinking world like this.^ I don't want to live anyway...not in a stinking world like this.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ It's a stinking world because it lets the young get onto the old, like you done.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.Alex: Oh...and what's so stinking about it?^ Alex: Oh...and what's so stinking about it?
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.Tramp: It's a stinking world because there's no law and order any more.^ Tramp: It's a stinking world because there's no law and order any more.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ Men on the moon, and men spinning around the earth, and there's not no attention paid to earthly law and order no more.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ One of the conclusions of the film is, of course, that there are limits to which society should go in maintaining law and order.
  • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

.It's a stinking world because it lets the young get onto the old, like you done.^ It's a stinking world because it lets the young get onto the old, like you done.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ Tramp: It's a stinking world because there's no law and order any more.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ I don't want to live anyway...not in a stinking world like this.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.Oh...it's no world for an old man any longer.^ Oh...it's no world for an old man any longer.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.What sort of a world is it at all?^ What sort of a world is it at all?
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.Men on the moon, and men spinning around the earth, and there's not no attention paid to earthly law and order no more.^ Men on the moon, and men spinning around the earth, and there's not no attention paid to earthly law and order no more.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ Tramp: It's a stinking world because there's no law and order any more.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ One of the conclusions of the film is, of course, that there are limits to which society should go in maintaining law and order.
  • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]


[Alex has just struck Dim on the legs for ridiculing a woman's singing of Beethoven]
Dim: What did you do that for?
.Alex: For being a bastard with no manners, you haven't a dook of an idea how to comport yourself public-wise, O my brother!^ Oh, nobody can prove anything about anybody as usual, but I'm warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ And I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be...Yarbles, great bolshy yarblockos to you.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ After Dim blows a raspberry at the singer, Alex smashes him across the legs with his cane for lack of respect ("for being a bastard with no manners") for his favorite, beloved composer.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.Dim: I don't like you should do what you've done and I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be.^ And I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be...Yarbles, great bolshy yarblockos to you.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ Georgie: All right, no more picking on Dim, brother.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

^ Unless you want a pop score, I don't see any reason not to avail yourself of the great orchestral music of the past and present.
  • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

Alex: Watch that, do watch that O Dim, if to continue to be on live thou, dost wist?
Dim: Yarbles! .Great bolshy yarblockos to you.^ And I'm not your brother no more and wouldn't want to be...Yarbles, great bolshy yarblockos to you.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.I'll meet you with chain or nozh or britva anytime.^ I'll meet you with chain or nozh or britva any time.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

.I'm not having you aiming tolchocks at me reasonless.^ Not having you aiming tolchocks at me reasonless.
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971) 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.filmsite.org [Source type: General]

It stands to reason, I won't have it.
.Alex: A nozh scrap anytime you say.^ You can't say that the film portrays an unfair, untruthful view of society, when the point of the film is that Alex's view of society is one sided and wrong in the first place.

[long pause]
Dim: Doobiedoob, a bit tired maybe, best not to say more. Bedways is rightways now, so best we go homeways and get a bit of spatchka. Right-right?

Dad: I wonder, where exactly is it he goes to work of evenings?
.Mum: Well, like he says, it's mostly odd things he does, helping like, here and there as it might be.^ But there's a point here: the film does wallow in the base nature of its character's perspective; Alex does "dig it" to use Kael's woodenly "with-it" phrasing.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]


Deltoid: There was a bit of a nastiness last night, yes. Some very extreme nastiness, yes. A few of a certain Billyboy's friends were ambulanced off late, yes? Your name was mentioned, the word has got thru to me by the usual channels. Certain friends of yours were named also. .Oh, nobody can prove anything about anybody as usual, but I'm warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself!^ Unless you want a pop score, I don't see any reason not to avail yourself of the great orchestral music of the past and present.
  • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ You must start by locating in the Library, or elsewhere, one piece of academic writing about a film other than those studied in the lectures on the module.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One such case was of a sinister character who murdered a 79 year old woman who was according to the Daily Mail, "praying at her friend's grave side".
  • The Kubrick Site: The ACO Controversy in the UK 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[he strikes Alex sharply in the groin]
Deltoid: What gets into you all? We study the problem. We've been studying it for damn well near a century, yes, but we get no further with our studies. You've got a good home here, good loving parents, you've got not too bad of a brain. Is it some devil that crawls inside of you?
Alex: Nobody's got anything on me, brother, sir. I've been out of the rookers of the millicents for a long time now.
Deltoid: That's just what worries me. A bit too long to be safe. You're about due now by my reckoning. .That's why I'm warning you, little Alex, to keep your handsome young proboscis out of the dirt.^ In Broadmoor they have drugs that bring you out in rashes...Alex's aversion therapy seems to me to be the exact equivalent to 900mg of Largatil.
  • The Kubrick Site: The ACO Controversy in the UK 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Why did Kubrick have Alex's little afternoon orgy tricked out with speeded-up motion, the William Tell Overture comically blasting over it?
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

Do I make myself clear?
Alex: As an unmuddied lake, sir. As clear as an azure sky of deepest summer. You can rely on me, sir.

Alex: Let's get things nice and sparkling clear. .This sarcasm, if I may call it such, does not become you, O my little brothers.^ And when this figure is completely immoral, the viewer or daydreamer may become uncomfortable because they're always aware something a little untoward is going on.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Very little of modern art does that -- certainly not in the sense that a great work of art can make you wonder how its creation was accomplished by a mere mortal.
  • The Kubrick Site: Kubrick's comments regarding 'A Clockwork Orange' 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.visual-memory.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

As I am your droog and leader, I am entitled to know what goes on, eh? Now then, Dim, what does that great big horsy gape of a grin portend?
Georgie: All right, no more picking on Dim, brother. That's part of the new way.
Alex: New way? What's this about a new way? .There's been some very large talk behind my sleeping back, and no error.^ Certainly the characters of the novel explain this Christian business to us a few times over several talks, though it is by no means very clear-cut.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

Georgie: Well, if you must have it, have it then. .We go around, shop crasting and the like, coming out with a pitiful rookerful of money each.^ A final question we would like you to try to answer (if there is time in your seminar) – a question which comes very much out of the first lecture on the course.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A Clockwork Orange 's simple story is structured around a fable-like what-goes-around-comes-around framework.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

Dim: Pitiful rookerful.
Georgie: And there's Will the English, in the Muscleman coffee mesto, saying he can fence anything that any malchick tries to crast. The shiny stuff, the ice, the big, big, big money is available, is what Will the English says.
Dim: Big, big money.
Alex: And what will you do with the big, big, big money? Have you not everything you need? Have you not everything you need? If you need a motor car, you pluck it from the trees. If you need pretty polly, you take it.
Georgie: Brother, you think and talk sometimes like a little child.

Alex: I won't say a single solitary slovo unless I have my lawyer here. I know the law, you bastards.
Inspector: We'll have to show our little friend Alex here that we know the law too, but that knowing the law isn't everything.

Deltoid: Dear, dear, this boy does look a mess, doesn't he? Just look at the state of him.
Policeman: Love's young nightmare, like.
Inspector: Violence makes violence. He resisted his lawful arrestors.
Deltoid: This is the end of the line for me.

.Chaplain: The Governor has grave doubts about it [aversion therapy] and I have heard that there are very serious dangers involved.^ There is a long history of complaints about the ‘dangers of cinema’ – a history which began almost the moment the first moving images were screened.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Alex: I don't care about the dangers, Father. I just want to be good. I want for the rest of my life to be one act of goodness.
.Chaplain: The question is whether or not this technique really makes a man good.^ It's geared to make the point that, "God made man free to choose either good or evil and that this is an astounding gift."
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

Goodness comes from within. Goodness is chosen. When a man cannot choose, he ceases to be a man.
Alex: I don't understand about the whys and wherefores, Father. I only know I want to be good.
Chaplain: Be patient, my son. Put your trust in the Lord.

Minister: Cram criminals together and what do you get - concentrated criminality, crime in the midst of punishment.
Governor: I agree, sir, what we need are larger prisons - more money.
Minister: Not a chance, my dear fellow. The Government can't be concerned any longer with outmoded penological theories. Soon we may be needing all our prison space for political offenders. Common criminals like these are best dealt with on a purely curative basis. Kill the criminal reflex, that's all. Full implementation in a year's time. Punishment means nothing to them, you can see that. They enjoy their so-called punishment.
Alex: You're absolutely right, sir.
Minister: What is your crime?
Alex: The accidental killing of a person, sir.

Alex: It's a sin..using Ludwig van like that. He did no harm to anyone. Beethoven just wrote music.
Dr. Brodsky: It can't be helped. Here's the punishment element perhaps. The Governor ought to be pleased...I'm sorry, Alex, this is for your own good. You'll have to bear with us for a while. .You must take your chance, boy.^ If you have a chance before your seminar, read this (quite short) article.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The choice has been all yours.

Chaplain: Choice! The boy has no real choice, has he? Self-interest, the fear of physical pain drove him to that grotesque act of self-abasement. Its insincerity was clearly to be seen. He ceases to be a wrong-doer. He ceases also to be a creature capable of moral choice.
Minister: Padre, these are subtleties! We are not concerned with motives, with the higher ethics. We are concerned only with cutting down crime. And with relieving the ghastly congestion in our prisons. He will be your true Christian, ready to turn the other cheek, ready to be crucified rather than crucify. Sick to the very heart at the thought even of killing a fly. Reclamation, joy before the angels of God. The point is that it works!
.Alex: [voice-over] And the very next day, your Friend and Humble Narrator was a free man.^ Our only clues come from Alex, our "humble narrator" as he humorously refers to himself in the novel, and he's not a trustworthy witness.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]


Dad: Are you all right, lad?
Mum: Dad...it's the treatment.
Joe: Well, it's disgusting. I mean, it's enough to put you off your food.
Mum: Oh leave him be, Joe, it's the treatment.

[Alex encounters his old friends Dim and Georgie, who are now policemen]
Alex: It's impossible! I can't believe it!
Georgie: Evidence of the ol' glazzies! .Nothing up our sleeves, no magic little Alex!^ Why did Kubrick have Alex's little afternoon orgy tricked out with speeded-up motion, the William Tell Overture comically blasting over it?
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

A job for two who are now of job age! The police!

Alex: The old days are dead and gone. For what I did in the past, I've been punished...I've been cured.
Dim: This is to make sure you stay cured.
[he and Georgie beat Alex bloody and half-drown him]

Alex: Your wife, sir, is she away?
Mr. Alexander: NO, SHE'S DEAD!
Alex: I'm sorry to hear about that, sir.
Mr. Alexander: She was very badly raped, you see. We were assaulted by a gang of vicious young hoodlums in this house, in this very room you are sitting in now. I was left a helpless cripple, but for her, the agony was too great. The doctors said it was pneumonia because it happened some months later during a flu epidemic. The doctors told me it was pneumonia but I knew what it was. A victim of the modern age - poor, poor girl. And now, you, another victim of the modern age, but you can be helped.

Conspirator: Do you still feel suicidal?
Alex: Well, put it this way, I feel very low in myself. I can't see much in the future, and I feel that any second something terrible is going to happen to me. [slumps into spaghetti]

Minister: We tried to help you. We followed recommendations which were made to us that turned out to be wrong. An inquiry will place the responsibility where it belongs. We want you to regard us as friends. We put you right. You are getting the best of treatment. .We never wished you harm, but there are some who did, and do, and I think you know who those are.^ There is an on-going debate about what is the purpose of studying film, and indeed other media, and the implications of that for how we study them, which you need to encounter and think about.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This lecture will not be as closely connected to the screening as some others, as its point will be to encourage you to think about the ways in which film analysts attend to the films they study.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

There are certain people who wanted to use you for political ends. .They would have been glad to have you dead, for they thought they could then blame it all on the Government.^ And of course by the time a government could do that, we'd no longer be perusing books by Burgess or anyone else; we wouldn't care either because we would all have . . .
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

There is also a certain man, a writer of subversive literature, who has been howling for your blood. He has been mad with desire to stick a knife into you but you are safe from him now. We put him away. He found out that you had done wrong to him. At least he believed you had done wrong. He formed this idea in his head that you had been responsible for the death of someone near and dear to him. He was a menace. .We put him away for his own protection, and also for yours...We are interested in you and when you leave here you will have no worries.^ In seminar groups, we ask you to bring in examples you have discovered on your own regarding the public presence of films.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Explain in your own words what you understand by this distinction and then, using a film that has not been taught to you on the module, show how the two kinds of analysis could be applied.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

We shall see to everything - a good job on a good salary.
Alex: What job and how much?
.Minister: You must have an interesting job with a salary which you would regard as adequate, not only for the job that you're going to do, and in compensation for what you believe you have suffered, but also because you are helping us.^ In what you read for the seminar, what key concepts, theories and methods can you identify, and what are the jobs that they are believed able to do?
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ And when this figure is completely immoral, the viewer or daydreamer may become uncomfortable because they're always aware something a little untoward is going on.
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This week, we are going to consider an interesting case where the ‘audience-in-the-text’ has met up with the audience s in the world – but they aren’t necessarily the kinds of audience you would normally think of … the Catholic Church, and the FBI for two.
  • STUDYING FILM 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC users.aber.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Alex: Helping you, sir?
Minister: We always help our friends, don't we? .It is no secret that this Government has lost a lot of popularity because of you, my boy.^ And of course by the time a government could do that, we'd no longer be perusing books by Burgess or anyone else; we wouldn't care either because we would all have . . .
  • Bright Lights Film Journal | Counter Clockwise: On Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange 22 September 2009 14:014 UTC www.brightlightsfilm.com [Source type: Original source]

There are some who think that at the next election, we shall be out. The press has chosen to take a very unfavorable view of what we tried to do. But public opinion has a way of changing, and you...you can be instrumental in changing the public's verdict. Do you understand, Alex? Do I make myself clear?
Alex: As an unmuddied lake, Fred. As clear as an azure sky of deepest summer. You can rely on me, Fred.

See also

External links

Wikipedia
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Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 21, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on A Clockwork Orange (film), which are similar to those in the above article.








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