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Aalen
Aalen Joseph.jpg
Coat of arms of Aalen
Aalen is located in Germany
Aalen
Coordinates 48°50′0″N 10°6′0″E / 48.833333°N 10.1°E / 48.833333; 10.1
Administration
Country Germany
State Baden-Württemberg
Admin. region Stuttgart
District Ostalbkreis
Mayor Martin Gerlach
Basic statistics
Area 146.624 km2 (56.612 sq mi)
Elevation 430 m  (1411 ft)
Population 66,252  (1 August 2007)
 - Density 452 /km2 (1,170 /sq mi)
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate AA
Postal codes 73430–73434
Area codes 07361/-66/-67
Website www.aalen.de
Reichsstadt Aalen
Imperial City of Aalen
Free Imperial City of the Holy Roman Empire
Hohenstaufen
 
Oettingen
1360–1803
Capital Aalen
Government Republic
Historical era Middle Ages
 - City founded 13th century
 - Gained Reichsfreiheit 1360
 - Protestant Reformation 1575
 - Returned to Catholicism 1628–32
 - Devastated by fire 1634
 - Mediatised to
    Württemberg
 
1803 1803
It's uncertain whether or not the city previous belonged to one of the Hohenstaufen duchies of Swabia or to the Counts of Oettingen

Aalen (German pronunciation: [ˈaːlən]) is a town in the German state of Baden-Württemberg. It is the seat of the Ostalbkreis district, and its largest town.

Contents

Geography

Aalen is situated on the upper reaches of the river Kocher, at the foot of the Swabian Alb to the south and south east and close to the hilly landscape of the Ellwanger Berge to the north. The Aal is a small river stretching only on the town's territory.[1] Aalen is at about 70 kilometres east of Stuttgart and 48 kilometres[2] (30 miles) north of Ulm.

History

From about 150 / 160 AD a Roman fort housed the cavalry unit Ala II Flavia milliaria at the site of present-day Aalen. The location was strategically important at the time, in the direct vicinity of the Rhaetian Limes. The unit being 1000 soldiers strong, the fort was the greatest fort of auxiliaries along the border to unoccupied Germania. A civilian settlement was adjacent on the south and the east. Around 260, the Romans gave up the fort as they withdrew their frontier to Germania back to the Rhine and Danube rivers, and the Alamanni took over the region.[3] It has been suggested that the name of Aalen traces back to the Roman fort, but this was disproved by later research.

The first time Aalen was mentioned in the Middle Ages was in an inventory list of Ellwangen, dated ca. 1136, as the village Alon[3]. Aalen was probably granted town privileges in the 13th century, though it is not certain whether by the Staufians or by the counts of Oettingen. It was first mentioned in written records in the 14th century when it was subject to the counts of Oettingen. Aalen was an Imperial City (often misreferred to as Imperial Free City) from 1360 to 1803, when it was annexed to Württemberg. It suffered a severe fire in 1634.[2] It then became the seat of an Oberamt from which the district (Kreis) Aalen emerged in 1938. The latter merged with the district of Schwäbisch Gmünd to the newly formed Ostalbkreis in 1973, though Aalen remained the district seat. In 1975, Wasseralfingen, a town with a third of the population of Aalen, was merged into Aalen.[2]

Economy

In the early 20th century the population was 10,000. Wool and linen goods were manufactured, there were ribbon looms and tanneries in the town, and a large iron works in the neighbourhood. The economy of Aalen is today dominated by metal processing. Besides machine construction, the optical sector plays an important role, as well as the textile and paper industries. There are several microbreweries, of which the one in Wasseralfingen is the most popular with a beer called Wasseralfinger.

Its church of Saint Nicholas dates back to 1765; the town hall dates back even further, to 1636. In addition to its historical sites, Aalen's Limesmuseum of Roman relics was opened in 1964.[2]

Aalen is a health resort, with the Limes-Thermen (German: “Limes Thermae”) hot springs. The Tiefer Stollen (German: “deep adit”) mine, where ore was once mined for the iron works in Wasseralfingen, now offers therapy for asthma and has a mining museum open for visitors. A mine railway takes visitors deep into the Braunenberg mountain.

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Transport

Aalen train station

Aalen is located directly on the Autobahn A7 and is also well connected to the network of federal roads (Bundesstraßen).

The Aalen train station is a regional railway hub, with InterCity trains running KarlsruheStuttgart–Aalen–Nürnberg, and regional trains connecting with Stuttgart, Ulm, Crailsheim and Donauwörth.

The local bus system is of high quality; its double-decker buses are among the few in use in Germany.

Windpark Waldhausen

Windpark Waldhausen began operating in early 2007. It consists of seven REpower MM92 wind turbines with a nameplate capacity of 2 MW each.[4] The hub height of each wind turbine is 100 metres (330 ft), with a rotor diameter of 92 metres (300 ft).

Sport

Aalen has several sport teams. The Scholz Arena is the home stadium of the VfR Aalen football club. Aalen's wrestling team KSV Aalen is one of the top clubs in all of Germany, so is the wrestling division of the TSV Dewangen, resident in Aalen's borough of Dewangen.

Boroughs of Aalen

International relations

Twin towns — sister cities

Aalen is twinned with:

Image gallery

References

  1. ^ Geographical information system of the town of Aalen
  2. ^ a b c d Aalen, Encyclopædia Britannica; retrieved December 12, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online
  3. ^ a b Diethelm Winter, ed (1992) (in German). Der Ostalbkreis (2nd edition ed.). Theiss, Stuttgart, Germany. pp. 315–320. ISBN 3-8062-0891-3.  
  4. ^ "Technische Daten der Windkraftanlagen in Waldhausen (Technical data of wind turbines in Waldhausen)". Windpark Waldhausen. http://www.windparkwaldhausen.de/content-75-technische_daten.html. Retrieved 2008-12-05.  

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

AALEN, a town of Germany, in the kingdom of Wurttemberg, pleasantly situated on the Kocher, at the foot of the Swabian Alps, about 50 m. E. of Stuttgart, and with direct railway communication with Ulm and Cannstatt. Pop. 10,000. Woollen and linen goods are manufactured, and there are ribbon looms and tanneries in the town, and large iron works in the neighbourhood. There are several schools and churches, and a statue of the poet Christian Schubart. Aalen was a free imperial city from 1360 to 1802, when it was annexed to Wurttemberg.


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Simple English

Aalen

Aalen
Coordinates 48°50′14″N 10°05′37″E / 48.83722°N 10.09361°E / 48.83722; 10.09361
Administration
Country Germany
State Baden-Württemberg
Admin. region Stuttgart
District Ostalbkreis
Town subdivisions Kernstadt und 7 Stadtbezirke
Lord Mayor Martin Gerlach (Ind.)
Basic statistics
Area 146.48 km2 (56.56 sq mi)
Elevation 429 m  (1408 ft)
Population 66,790  (31 December 2006)
 - Density 456 /km2 (1,181 /sq mi)
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate AA
Postal codes 73430–73434
Area codes 07361, 07366, 07367
Website www.aalen.de
Reichsstadt Aalen
Imperial City of Aalen

City-state

1360 – 1803

Capital Aalen
Government Republic
Historical era Middle Ages
 - City founded 13th century
 - Gained Reichsfreiheit 1360
 - Protestant Reformation 1575
 - Returned to Catholicism 1628–32
 - Devastated by fire 1634
 - Mediatised to
    Württemberg
 
1803
It's uncertain whether or not the city previous belonged to one of the Hohenstaufen duchies of Swabia or to the Counts of Oettingen

Aalen (pronounced [ˈaːlən]) is a town in the German state of Baden-Württemberg. It is the capital of the Ostalbkreis district, and its largest town.


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