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Aaron Klug
Born 11 August 1926 (1926-08-11) (age 83)
Želva, Lithuania
Nationality United Kingdom
Fields Biophysics, chemistry
Known for crystallographic electron microscopy
Notable awards Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1982

Sir Aaron Klug, OM, PRS (born 11 August 1926) is a Lithuanian-born[1] British chemist and biophysicist, and winner of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes.[2]

Contents

Biography

Klug was born in Želva, Lithuania to Jewish parents Lazar and Bella (née Silin) Klug with whom he moved to South Africa at the age of two. He later graduated with a degree in science at the University of Witwatersrand and studied crystallography at the University of Cape Town before moving to England, completing his doctorate at Trinity College, Cambridge in 1953.

He moved to Birkbeck College in the University of London in late 1953, and started working with Rosalind Franklin in John Bernal's lab. This experience aroused a lifelong interest in the study of viruses, and during his time there he made discoveries in the structure of the tobacco mosaic virus. In 1962 he moved to the newly built MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. Over the following decade Klug used methods from X-ray diffraction, microscopy and structural modelling to develop crystallographic electron microscopy in which a sequence of two-dimensional images of crystals taken from different angles are combined to produce three-dimensional images of the target.

He was awarded the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize from Columbia University in 1981. Between 1986 and 1996 he was director of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1988.[1] He was elected President of the Royal Society, and served from 1995-2000. He was appointed OM in 1995 - as is customary for Presidents of the Royal Society. He is also a member of the Board of Scientific Governors at The Scripps Research Institute.

In 2005 he was awarded South Africa's Order of Mapungubwe (gold) for exceptional achievements in medical science.[3]

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Aaron Klug (1926-)". Jewish Virtual Library. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/klug.html. Retrieved 2009-110-07.  
  2. ^ The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (18 October 1982). "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1982". Press release. http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/1982/index.html. Retrieved 13 September 2007.  
  3. ^ "National Orders awards 27 September 2005". State of South Africa. 29 September 2005. http://www.info.gov.za/aboutgovt/orders/2005/klug.htm. Retrieved 13 September 2007.  

References

  • Amos LA, Finch JT (March 2004). "Aaron Klug and the revolution in biomolecular structure determination". Trends in Cell Biology 14 (3): 148–52. doi:10.1016/j.tcb.2004.01.002. PMID 15003624.  
  • Shafrir E (September 1994). "Aaron Klug--a pioneer of crystallographic electron microscopy". Israel Journal of Medical Sciences 30 (9): 734. PMID 8088991.  
  • Shampo MA, Kyle RA (June 1994). "Sir Aaron Klug--Nobel Prize winner for chemistry". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Mayo Clinic 69 (6): 556. PMID 8189761.  
  • Wakabayashi K (February 1983). "[Accomplishment of Dr. Aaron Klug, winner of Nobel prize in chemistry, 1982]" (in Japanese). Tanpakushitsu Kakusan Koso. Protein, Nucleic Acid, Enzyme 28 (2): 156–7. PMID 6342048.  
  • John Finch; 'A Nobel Fellow On Every Floor', Medical Research Council 2008, 381 pp, ISBN 978-1840469-40-0; this book is all about the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge.

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Sir Aaron Klug (born August 11, 1926) is a Lithuanian-born British chemist and biophysicist, and winner of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes.

Sourced

  • I like teaching and the contact with young minds keeps one on one's toes.
    • in his Autobiography, The Nobel Prizes 1982, Editor Wilhelm Odelberg, Nobel Foundation, Stockholm, 1983

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