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Aaron Robinson
Catcher
Born: June 23, 1915(1915-06-23)
Lancaster, South Carolina
Died: March 9, 1966 (aged 50)
Lancaster, South Carolina
Batted: Left Threw: Right 
MLB debut
May 6, 1943 for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 1951 for the Boston Red Sox
Career statistics
Batting average     .260
Home runs     61
Runs batted in     272
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Aaron Andrew Robinson (June 23, 1915 in Lancaster, South Carolina - March 9, 1966 in Lancaster, South Carolina), was a professional baseball player who played catcher in the Major Leagues from 1943-1951. He played for the Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, and Boston Red Sox.

Aaron Robinson was a fine defensive catcher and won a World Series with the New York Yankees in 1947.

In 1946, Robinson hit 16 home runs for the Yankees with a .297 batting average, .388 on base percentage, and .506 slugging percentage. He finished 16th in the AL MVP voting. In 1947, he was selected to the AL All Star team.

In 1953 only, the 'Aaron Robinson, MacGregor G176' catcher's mitt was produced.

Robinson lost his job with the Yankees to Yogi Berra and was traded to the White Sox for left-handed pitcher Ed Lopat.

Robinson was the catcher for the Tigers when they were in the middle of the 1950 pennant race. On September 24, 1950, in a critical game against Cleveland, heavy smoke from a Canadian forest fire forced the Tigers to put on the lights in the Sunday afternoon game. With the score tied 1-1, Bob Lemon opened the 10th with a triple, and two intentional walks followed. With the bases loaded and one out, Robinson thought he could complete a double play be stepping on the plate. Because of the haze, he did not see first baseman Don Kolloway remove the force after fielding the ball. Robinson's mental lapse cost Detroit the game.

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