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East Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire
County constituency
House House of Commons
Elects One MPs
Created 1918 (1918)
Abolished 1950 (1950)

Aberdeen and Kincardine East (or East Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire) was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1918 to 1950. The constituency elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

As created in 1918, the constituency was largely a replacement for Eastern Aberdeenshire. In 1950, it was replaced by East Aberdeenshire.

Contents

Boundaries

Aberdeen and Kincardine East was created by the Representation of the People Act 1918 and first used in the 1918 general election. The constituency was entirely within thecounty of Aberdeen and one of five constituencies covering the county Aberdeen, the city of Aberdeen and the county of Kincardine (except that the Kincardine burgh of Inverbervie was part of a sixth constituency, Montrose Burghs). Also entirely within the county of Aberdeen, there was Aberdeen and Kincardine Central. Kincardine and West Aberdeen covered the county of Kincardine (minus the burgh of Inverbervie) and part of the county of Aberdeen.

Aberdeen and Kincardine East consisted of "The county districts of Deer and Turriff, inclusive of all burghs situated therein." Therefore it included the burghs of Fraserburgh, Peterhead, Rosehearty and Turriff.[1]

The same boundaries were used in the 1922 general elecion, the 1923 general election, the 1924 general election, the 1929 general election, the 1931 general election, the 1935 general election and the 1945 general election.

The House of Commons (Redistribution of Seats) Act 1949 created new boundaries for the 1950 general election. Aberdeen and Kincardine East was mergeed with part of Aberdeen and Kincardine Central to form East Aberdeenshire, which one of four constituencies covering the county of Aberdeen and the city of Aberdeen. East Aberdeenshire and West Aberdeenshire were entirely within the county, and Aberdeen North and Aberdeen South were entirely within the city.[1]

Member of Parliament

Election Member Party
1918 Sir William Henry Cowan Coalition Liberal
1922 Frederick Martin Liberal
1924 Sir Robert Boothby Conservative
1950 constituency abolished

Election results

General Election 1945: Aberdeen and Kincardine East [2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Robert Boothby 13,290 54.90
Labour J.R. Allen 10,918 45.10
General Election 1935: Aberdeen and Kincardine East [3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Robert Boothby 12,748
Labour Frederick Martin 9,627
General Election 1931: Aberdeen and Kincardine East[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Robert Boothby 16,396
Labour Frederick Martin 6,299
General Election 1924: Aberdeen and Kincardine East[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Robert Boothby 7,363
Liberal Frederick Martin 4,680
Labour W.S. Cormack 3,899
General Election 1923: Aberdeen and Kincardine East [6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Frederick Martin 8,793
Conservative F.L. Wallace 6,949
General Election 1922: Aberdeen and Kincardine East [7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Frederick Martin 8,018
National Liberal Sir William Henry Cowan 5,227
General Election 1918: Aberdeen and Kincardine East [8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Coalition Liberal Sir William Henry Cowan 4,430
Independent F.L. Wallace 4,343

References

  1. ^ a b Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972 (ISBN 0-900178-09-4), F. W. S. Craig 1972
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Whitaker's Almanack, 1939
  4. ^ Whitaker's Almanack, 1934
  5. ^ Oliver & Boyd's Edinburgh Almanac, 1927
  6. ^ The Times, 8 December 1923
  7. ^ The Times, 17 November 1922
  8. ^ Whitaker's Almanack, 1920

See also

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