The Full Wiki

Abingdon, Virginia: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Abingdon, Virginia
—  Town  —
Abingdon Welcome Sign

Seal
Motto: Honor Pro Antiquis, Fides Pro Futuris
Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Coordinates: 36°42′35″N 81°58′32″W / 36.70972°N 81.97556°W / 36.70972; -81.97556Coordinates: 36°42′35″N 81°58′32″W / 36.70972°N 81.97556°W / 36.70972; -81.97556
Country United States
State Virginia
County Washington
Founded 1776
Government
 - Mayor Ed Morgan
Area
 - Total 8.3 sq mi (21.6 km2)
 - Land 8.3 sq mi (21.6 km2)
 - Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 2,087 ft (636 m)
Population (2004)
 - Total 7,938
 Density 932.6/sq mi (360.2/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 24210-24212
Area code(s) 276
FIPS code 51-00148[1]
GNIS feature ID 1498444[2]
Website http://www.abingdon.com/

Abingdon is a town in Washington County, Virginia, USA, 133 miles (214 km) southwest of Roanoke. The population was 7,780 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Washington County[3] and is a designated Virginia Historic Landmark. It has historic treasures, and a fine arts and crafts scene centered around the galleries and museums along Main Street.

Abingdon is part of the KingsportBristol (TN)Bristol (VA) Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region.

Contents

History

Barter Theatre

The land on which the town of Abingdon is situated was originally surveyed between the years 1748 and 1750 by Dr. Thomas Walker and was part of the Great Road that Colonel William Byrd III ordered cut through the wilderness on to Kingsport, Tennessee.[4] In 1760, famed frontiersman, Daniel Boone, named the area Wolf Hills, after his dogs were attacked by a pack of wolves during a hunting expedition. The original location of the attack is located on 'Courthouse Hill' and is also the location of The Cavehouse Craft Shop. Now 27 wolf sculptures are found around the city.[4] During Lord Dunmore's War, Black's Fort was established in 1774 by Joseph Black to protect local settlers in the region from Indian attacks.[4] It consisted of a log stockade, with a few log cabins inside, to which nearby settlers were to repair in event of attack, as they did in 1776 when harassed by Dragging Canoe.[5]

In 1776 the community of Black's Fort was made the county seat of the newly formed Washington county. In 1778, Black's Fort was incorporated as the town of Abingdon, said to be named for the ancestral home of Martha Washington. Martha Washington College, a school for women, operated in Abingdon from 1860 to 1932 in a former private residence; since 1935 the building has been occupied by a hotel, the Martha Washington Inn. The Barter Theatre, the state theatre of Virginia, was opened in Abingdon in 1933. Virginia Governors Wyndham Robertson, David Campbell, and John B. Floyd lived here. Abingdon is also the final stop along the Virginia Creeper Trail, which allows pedestrian, cyclist and equestrian traffic. This trail is 17 miles long extending from White Top Mountain to Damascus, VA. The Washington County Historical Society is located in Abingdon and serves as a regional genealogy center, in addition as a repository for Washington County history.

The town of Abingdon was possibly named after Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England, the ancestral home of Martha Washington. Other possible origins of the name include Daniel Boone's home in Abington, Pennsylvania, or Lord Abingdon, friend of settler William Campbell.[6]

Geography

Abingdon is located at 36°42′35″N 81°58′32″W / 36.70972°N 81.97556°W / 36.70972; -81.97556 (36.709773, -81.975694)[7].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 8.3 square miles (21.6 km²), all of it land.

The town is located in the Great Appalachian Valley, between the Middle Fork and the North Fork of the Holston River.

Demographics

Office of the Abingdon Virginian newspaper

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 7,780 people, 3,522 households, and 2,092 families residing in the town. The population density was 932.6 people per square mile (360.2/km²). There were 3,788 housing units at an average density of 454.1/sq mi (175.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.99% White, 3.41% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.80% of the population.

There were 3,522 households out of which 23.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.6% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.6% were non-families. 36.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.72.

In the town the population was spread out with 18.3% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 20.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 81.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $30,976, and the median income for a family was $46,106. Males had a median income of $32,005 versus $22,844 for females. The per capita income for the town was $22,486. About 7.3% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.4% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over.

Points of interest

  • Abingdon Historic District, which includes the Fields-Penn 1860 House Museum, Cave House Craft Shop, Arts Depot, and the Martha Washington Inn
  • Gallery District, which includes the Star Museum, Barr Photographics and Gallery, Cave House Craft Shop, Zazzy'z Cafe and Gallery, The Blue Windmill Gallery, Stone Mill Studios and many others.
  • Barter Theatre, designated as the "State Theatre of Virginia" in 1946 and is one of the longest-running professional regional theatres in the nation
  • The Crooked Road: Virginia's Heritage Music Trail
  • Virginia Creeper Trail, a 35-mile rail trail that runs from Abingdon to Whitetop, Virginia
  • Virginia Highlands Festival, held annually in August
  • William King Arts Center
  • Home of Wolf Hills Brewing Co.

Notable residents

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b c Official City of Abingdon website
  5. ^ Carrie Hunter Willis and Etta Belle Walker, 1937, Legends of the Skyline Drive and the Great Valley of Virginia, p. 118-119.
  6. ^ Tennis, Joe. Southwest Virginia Crossroads: An Almanac of Place Names and Places to See. Overmountain Press: Johnson City, Tennessee, 2004..
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1967. 
  9. ^ Hayes, Tim (2008-06-28). "LOCAL LEGENDS IN THE PROS: Harris’ Big League Career Was A Hit". Bristol Herald Courier. http://www.tricities.com/tri/sports/professional/professional_baseball/article/local_legends_in_the_pros_harris_big_league_career_was_a_hit/11129/. Retrieved 2008-06-28. 
  10. ^ Gail Harris Baseball Stats by Baseball Almanac

External links


Simple English

Abingdon, Virginia
—  Town  —
Motto: Honor Pro Antiquis, Fides Pro Futuris
Coordinates: 36°42′35″N 81°58′32″W / 36.70972°N 81.97556°W / 36.70972; -81.97556
Country United States
State Virginia
County Washington
Founded 1776
Government
 - Mayor Lois Humphreys
Area
 - Total 8.3 sq mi (21.6 km2)
 - Land 8.3 sq mi (21.6 km2)
 - Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 2,087 ft (636 m)
Population (2004)
 - Total 7,938
 Density 932.6/sq mi (360.2/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 24210-24212
Area code(s) 276
FIPS code 51-00148[1]
GNIS feature ID 1498444[2]
Website http://www.abingdon.com/

Abingdon is a town in Washington County, Virginia, 133 miles (214 km) southwest of Roanoke.

References








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message