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Abraham Lincoln High School (San Diego, California): Wikis

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Lincoln High School
LincolnHornetsSD.JPG
Established 1955 (as high school)
Type Senior High School
Students ~2400
Grades 9-12
Location 4777 Imperial Avenue,
San Diego, California 92113, USA
District San Diego City Schools
Campus Urban
Colors Green and White
Mascot Hornets
Built 1949
Razed 2003
Reopened September 2007
Website Lincoln High School web site
Lincoln High School

Abraham Lincoln High School (also known as Lincoln High Educational Complex, Lincoln High School, or simply Lincoln), is an urban public high school that serves grades 9-12 in the American K-12 education system in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Southeast San Diego as part of the Encanto neighborhoods. It was named after President Abraham Lincoln. Originally serving middle school students, Lincoln was converted into a high school in 1955. The school has produced several nationally recognized popular sports figures.

In particular the school's Center for Social Justice [1] is educating San Diego's increasing activist culture. On Tuesday, February 10, 2009 a coalition of Lincoln High School along with Mission Bay High School, and several other schools including UC San Diego and San Diego State sent hundreds of students, parents and teachers in support of banning weapons training in San Diego schools. [2] The movement is reminiscent of the 1969/1970 Lincoln Walkouts which lasted for 10 days and resulted in the city's first Black principal. [3]

Contents

Construction of facilities in the 2000's

Expansion of the school was done on existing facilities until 2003. On September 24, 2003, Lincoln's cafeteria was the first building to be demolished.[4] The entire campus (with the exception of the gym) and a few homes nearby would eventually be razed to make way for construction of the new campus. This was a result of an elected ballot proposition approved by its citizens, leaving many students displaced and relocated to other high schools in the District. The campus expanded with additional acquisition of property through eminent domain.[5]

Before demolition, the campus had been infamous for its gang activity for which college student hopeful Willie James Jones Jr. was gunned down just days before he was to matriculate to the prestigious Cornell University, hitting major headlines all over San Diego media.[6] The school also had been criticized for being behind academically, and there remained some skepticism in the community about Lincoln's reopening over those criticisms. Pastor Roy Dixon was told by the principal that "kids entered Lincoln with extremely low reading levels and could not perform academically."[7]

Lincoln High School was reopened on September 4, 2007. The new 24-acre (97,000 m2) campus was designed by architect and Lincoln alum, Joseph Martinez (class of 1966), and rebuilt by many Lincoln alumni who took part in construction of the school.[8] At a cost of $129 million, Lincoln is currently the most expensive campus in the San Diego Unified School District.[8]

In its newly rebuilt form, Lincoln now features major improvements such as an increased student enrollment capacity of 2,700 (from an average of 800 students during Lincoln's last few years before demolition), a 790-seat performing arts center, a football and track stadium that can seat 3,700, and other extra facilities for press and concessions. The improvements addressed concerns over Lincoln's previously dilapidated and outdated facilities, proper allocation of rooms per grade enrollment, and the increasing high school enrollment pressures of the neighborhood, in addition to public input and suggestions given by members of the Lincoln community. The site also features modern, state-of-the-art building design and facilities specialized to the curriculum.[8][9][10]

Lincoln High has also produced the second most NFL players in the entire nation.

Lincoln High School is currently divided into four small academies:[11]

  • Lincoln 9th Grade Center for Social Justice
  • Lincoln Center for the Arts
  • Lincoln Center for Science and Engineering
  • Lincoln Center for Public Safety

The centers' themes were the result of a 2005 parent survey.[8]

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ "Archives for the ‘Center for Social Justice’ Category". http://lincolnhighsd.net/hornets/category/center-for-social-justice/.  
  2. ^ "Trustees Vote To End Marksmanship Traing". http://www.10news.com/video/18687674/index.html.  
  3. ^ "Celebrating 150 Years, The Sixties". http://www.sandi.net/events/150years/60s.html.  
  4. ^ "Media Advisory for Lincoln High's Demolition". San Diego Unified School District. 2003-09-23. http://www.sandi.net/propmm/news/AdvisoryLincolnDemo.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-28.  
  5. ^ "BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR FACILITIES MANAGEMENT BOARD OF EDUCATION AGENDA". SAN DIEGO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT. http://sandi.net/board/reports/2003/0513/e6summary.pdf. Retrieved 2007-08-23.  
  6. ^ "Willie James Jones, Jr. Memorial Scholarship". Cornell. http://ccsd.alumni.cornell.edu/scholarships.cfm. Retrieved 2007-08-23.  
  7. ^ Pastor Roy Dixon. ""What is your church’s purpose in your community and how are you carrying it out?"". Good News, etc.. http://www.goodnewsetc.com/105TS.htm. Retrieved 2007-08-23.  
  8. ^ a b c d Gao, Helen (2007-09-02). ""Rebirth of Lincoln High"". San Diego Union-Tribune. http://weblog.signonsandiego.com/news/education/20070902-9999-1n2lincoln.html. Retrieved 2007-09-28.  
  9. ^ "Lincoln High School". San Diego Unified School District. http://www.sandi.net/propMM/LincolnHS.htm. Retrieved 2007-08-23.  
  10. ^ Gao, Helen. "Rebuilding of venerable Lincoln High under way". http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20041209/news_7m9lincoln.html. Retrieved 2007-08-23.  
  11. ^ "Lincoln High School". http://www2.sandi.net/lincoln/. Retrieved 2007-09-28.  
  12. ^ a b "Special Feature on Lincoln High School's History". San Diego Union-Tribune. http://weblog.signonsandiego.com/multimedia/utmedia/070902lincoln/index.html. Retrieved 2007-09-28.  
  13. ^ Jensen, Jeffry (2002) [1992]. Dawson, Dawn P. ed. Great Athletes. 1 (Revised ed.). Salem Press. pp. 42–45. ISBN 1-58765-008-8.  
  14. ^ Gembrowski, Susan. "Soldier sought a family, touched many lives". Union-Tribune. http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/world/iraq/memorial/20030408-9999_1n8jones.html. Retrieved 2007-08-23.  

External links

2009 Education not Arms No Weapons Training Victory *[1] 1969 Lincoln Walkout Delivers First Black SD Principal Victory *[2]

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