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Acta Eruditorum (Latin for "reports/acts of the scholars") was the first scientific journal of the German lands, published from 1682 to 1782.[1]

It was founded in 1682 in Leipzig by Otto Mencke and patterned after the French Journal des savants and Italian Giornale de'letterati. Acta Eruditorum was a monthly edited in Latin language and contained excerpts from new writings, reviews, small essays and notes. Most of them were devoted to the natural sciences and mathematics. Since its inception many eminent scientists published there – Isaac Newton, Gottfried Leibniz, Jakob Bernoulli, Humphry Ditton, Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, Pierre-Simon Laplace and Jérôme Lalande but also humanists and philosophers as Veit Ludwig von Seckendorff, Stephan Bergler, Christian Thomasius and Christian Wolff.

After Otto Mencke's death Acta Eruditorum were directed by his son, Johann Burckhardt Mencke, who died in 1732. The magazine change its name by then and was called Nova Acta Eruditorum. Since 1754 it was led by Karl Andreas Bel.

References


Acta Eruditorum (Latin for "reports/acts of the scholars") was the first scientific journal of the German lands, published from 1682 to 1782.[1]

It was founded in 1682 in Leipzig by Otto Mencke and patterned after the French Journal des savants and Italian Giornale de'letterati. Acta Eruditorum was a monthly edited in Latin language and contained excerpts from new writings, reviews, small essays and notes. Most of them were devoted to the natural sciences and mathematics. Since its inception many eminent scientists published there – Isaac Newton, Gottfried Leibniz, Jakob Bernoulli, Humphry Ditton, Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, Pierre-Simon Laplace and Jérôme Lalande but also humanists and philosophers as Veit Ludwig von Seckendorff, Stephan Bergler, Christian Thomasius and Christian Wolff.

After Otto Mencke's death Acta Eruditorum were directed by his son, Johann Burckhardt Mencke, who died in 1732. The magazine changed its name by then and was called Nova Acta Eruditorum. Since 1754 it was led by Karl Andreas Bel.

References

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