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Adam Przeworski (Polish pronunciation: [pʂɛˈvɔrskʲi]; born 1940) is a Polish-American professor of Political Science. One of the main important theorists and analysers of democratic societies, theory of democracy and political economy, he is currently a full professor at the Wilf Family Department of Politics of New York University.

Born in 1940 in Warsaw, Poland, Przeworski graduated from Warsaw University in 1961. Soon afterwards, he moved to the United States, where he received his Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1966. He taught at the University of Chicago, where he was awarded with the title of Martin A. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor. He also held visiting appointments in India, Chile, Great Britain, France (among others, at the American University of Paris), Germany, Spain (Juan March Institute), and Switzerland. Since 1991, Przeworski has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2001 shared the Woodrow Wilson Prize for the book Democracy and Development. To date, he has authored 13 books and numerous articles.

Przeworski was a member of the September Group of Analytical Marxists, but left the group in the early 1990s.

Major works

  • Adam Przeworski; Michael E. Alvarez, Jose Antonio Cheibub, Fernando Limongi (2000). Adam Przeworski. ed. Democracy and Development; Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950-1990. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 336. ISBN 0-521-79379-3. 
  • Adam Przeworski, José María Maravall, ed (2003). Democracy and the Rule of Law. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 334. ISBN 0-521-53266-3. 
  • Adam Przeworski (2003). States and Markets; A Primer in Political Economy. p. 236. ISBN 0-521-53524-7. 
  • Adam Przeworski (1991). Democracy and the Market; Political and Economic Reforms in Eastern Europe and Latin America. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 208. ISBN 0-521-42335-X. 

Recent works

References

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Adam Przeworski (born 1940) is a Polish-American professor of Political Science. He was one of the members of the Analytical Marxism movement, and wrote Capitalism and Social Democracy in 1986.

Unsourced

  • If a Martian were asked to pick the most efficient and humane economic systems on earth, it would certainly not choose the countries which rely most on markets. The United States is a stagnant economy in which real wages have been constant for more than a decade and the real income of the bottom 40 percent of the population declined. It is an inhumane society in which 11.5 percent of the population, some 32 million people, including 20 percent of all children, live in absolute poverty. It is the oldest democracy on earth but also one with the lowest voting rates among democracies and the highest per capita prison population in the world. The fastest developing countries in the world today are among those where the state pursues active industrial and trade policies; the few countries in the world in which almost no one is poor today are those in which the state has been engaged in massive social welfare and labor market policies.
  • Democracy is an equilibrium.
  • Democracy is a system in which everyone assumes that they can lose elections, and they expect to win it in another chance.
  • In general dictators have not done better at [economic] policies than democrats—far from it. Most dictators have ravaged their countries for personal gain. Scholars have asked whether democracy helps or hurts the economic growth of poor countries and despite many surveys, have come to no conclusive answer.

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