Administrative divisions of Moldova: Wikis

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Moldova

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Moldova



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Currently, Moldova is divided into 37 first-tier units,[1] including 32 districts (Romanian: raioane; see also raions):

  1. Anenii Noi
  2. Basarabeasca
  3. Briceni
  4. Cahul
  5. Cantemir
  6. Călăraşi
  7. Căuşeni
  8. Cimişlia
  1. Criuleni
  2. Donduşeni
  3. Drochia
  4. Dubăsari
  5. Edineţ
  6. Făleşti
  7. Floreşti
  8. Glodeni
  1. Hînceşti
  2. Ialoveni
  3. Leova
  4. Nisporeni
  5. Ocniţa
  6. Orhei
  7. Rezina
  8. Rîşcani
  1. Sîngerei
  2. Soroca
  3. Străşeni
  4. Şoldăneşti
  5. Ştefan Vodă
  6. Taraclia
  7. Teleneşti
  8. Ungheni

three municipalities:

  1. Chişinău
  1. Bălţi
  1. Bender (Tighina)

one autonomous territorial unit:

  1. Gagauzia

and one territorial unit:

  1. Transnistria

The final status of the latter has not been settled yet, as the region, such as defined administratively, is not under the control of Moldovan authorities. The cities of Comrat and Tiraspol also have municipality status, but are not among first-tier units of Moldova; they are the seats of Gagauzia, respectively Transnistria.

Current administrative divisions of Moldova

Contents

Localities

Moldova has a total of 982 incorporated localities (de jure with 982 mayors and 982 local councils), of which 5 have municipality status, 60 have city status, and 917 are villages with commune status. They cover the entire area of the country. Another 699 villages are too small to have a separate administration, and are part of either cities (40 of them) or communes (659). This makes for a total of 1,681 localities of Moldova, all but two of which are inhabited.

The status of Chişinău, Bălţi, and Bender as municipalities and first-level territorial units of the country allows their suburb villages to have, when large enough, their own mayor and local council. By contrast, the villages that are administratively part of (some of) the other cities do not retain self-rule.

no type name municipalities cities communes villages/hamlets
w/o own government
total
1 municipality Chişinău 1 6 12 16 35
2 municipality Bălţi 1 - 2 - 3
3 municipality Bender 1 - 1 - 2
4 auton.territ.unit Găgăuzia 1 2 23 6 32
5 territorial unit Transnistria 1 9 69 68 147
6 district Anenii Noi - 1 25 19 45
7 district Basarabeasca - 1 6 3 10
8 district Briceni - 2 26 11 39
9 district Cahul - 1 36 18 55
10 district Cantemir - 1 26 24 51
11 district Călăraşi - 1 27 16 44
12 district Căuşeni - 2 28 18 48
13 district Cimişlia - 1 22 16 39
14 district Criuleni - 1 24 18 43
15 district Donduşeni - 1 21 8 30
16 district Drochia - 1 27 12 40
17 district Dubăsari - - 11 4 15
18 district Edineţ - 2 30 17 49
19 district Făleşti - 1 32 43 76
20 district Floreşti - 3 37 34 74
21 district Glodeni - 1 18 16 35
22 district Hînceşti - 1 38 24 63
23 district Ialoveni - 1 24 9 34
24 district Leova - 2 23 14 39
25 district Nisporeni - 1 22 16 39
26 district Ocniţa - 3 18 12 33
27 district Orhei - 1 37 37 75
28 district Rezina - 1 24 16 41
29 district Rîşcani - 2 26 27 55
30 district Sîngerei - 2 24 44 70
31 district Soroca - 1 34 33 68
32 district Străşeni - 2 25 12 39
33 district Şoldăneşti - 1 22 10 33
34 district Ştefan Vodă - 1 22 3 26
35 district Taraclia - 1 14 11 26
36 district Teleneşti - 1 30 23 54
37 district Ungheni - 2 31 41 74
Total 5 60 917 699 1681
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Notes

Areas not under central government control include:

  • Transnistria, which with the exception of six communes (comprising a total of ten localities) corresponds to the geographic part of Moldova situated to the east of the Dniestr (Romanian: Nistru) river, is de jure a part of Moldova, but in fact is governed by breakaway authorities. (See also: War of Transnistria.) The city of Dubăsari (administratively in Transnistria, and not in the Dubăsari district), and these six communes (administratively in the Dubăsari district of Moldova, and not in the administrsative definition of Transnistria), all controlled by the central authorities (except the village of Roghi in commune Molovata Nouă, which is controlled by Tiraspol), form the northern part of the security zone set at the end of the war.
  • Bender (Tighina) municipality (the city itself, and the commune Proteagailovca), and three communes (five localities) of Căuşeni district (Gîsca, Chiţcani, and Cremenciug) are de facto controlled by the breakaway regime of Transnistria. Together with one the commune Varniţa of Anenii Noi district and the commune Copanca of Căuşeni district under Moldovan control, these localities form the southern part of the security zone set at the end of the war. The city of Bender (Tighina) has both a Moldovan police force (mostly symbolic) and a Transnistrian militsiya force (practically in charge in most instances).

Population

  • The smallest entity electing a mayor is commune Salcia, Taraclia district, population 441. It consists of the village Salcia, population 382, and the village Orehovca, population 59. The largest entity is themunicipality of Chişinău, electing a mayor for 712,218 inhabitants.
  • The largest number of localities governed by a single commune or city governemtn in Moldova is 6. This is the case for:
On the opposite end, 41 of the 65 cities, and about half the communes of Moldova have local administration providing services for a single locality.
The village of Schinoasa was outlined within commune Ţibirica, Călăraşi district in 2007, and information is not available yet whether it has any population.
  • Village (hamlet) Ivanovca, commune Natalievca, Făleşti district, population 19, inhabited by 14 Russians and 5 Ukrainains, is the only inhabitted locality in Moldova without any ethnic Moldovans (Romanians). On the opposite end, one commune, Cigârleni, Ialoveni district, population 2,411, and 42 villages of sub-commune level (population varying from 1 to 673), have 100% Moldovan (Romanian) population.

Coincident names

Previous divisions

Counties (1998-2003)

Former counties of Moldova. The Chişinău municipality is incorrectly lumped on this map with the Chişinău County, although they were two distinct units.

Between 1998 and February 2003, Moldova was divided into 12 territorial units, including 1 municipality, 1 autonomous territorial unit, 1 territorial unit, and 9 counties (Romanian: judeţe; seats in brackets):

  1. Chişinău municipality, surrounded by Chişinău county, but different from it
  2. Bălţi County (Bălţi)
  3. Cahul County (Cahul)
  4. Chişinău County (Chişinău)
  5. Edineţ County (Edineţ)
  6. Lăpuşna County (Hînceşti)
  7. Orhei County (Orhei)
  8. Soroca County (Soroca)
  9. Tighina County (Căuşeni)
  10. Ungheni County (Ungheni)
  11. Găgăuzia, autonomous territorial unit (Comrat)
  12. Stânga Nistrului, territorial unit (Dubăsari)

In 2003, just before the abolition of the county system, a Taraclia County was split out from the Cahul County; it coincides with the current Taraclia district.

Cities and districts (1991-1998)

Between 1991-1998, Moldova was divided into 10 cities and 40 districts[2]:

Cities
Districts
  • Anenii Noi
  • Basarabeasca
  • Brinceni
  • Cahul
  • Camenca
  • Cantemir
  • Căinari
  • Călăraşi
  • Căuşeni
  • Ciadîr-Lunga
  • Cimişlia
  • Comrat
  • Criuleni
  • Donduşeni
  • Drochia
  • Dubăsari
  • Edineţ
  • Făleşti
  • Floreşti
  • Glodeni
  • Grigoriopol
  • Hînceşti
  • Ialoveni
  • Leova
  • Nisporeni
  • Ocniţa
  • Orhei
  • Rezina
  • Rîbniţa
  • Rîşcani
  • Sîngerei
  • Slobozia
  • Soroca
  • Străşeni
  • Şoldăneşti
  • Ştefan Vodă
  • Taraclia
  • Teleneşti
  • Ungheni
  • Vulcăneşti

See also

  • ISO 3166-2:MD, ISO subdivision codes for Moldova

References

External links


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