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Coordinates: 52°01′N 4°17′W / 52.02°N 4.28°W / 52.02; -4.28

Adpar
Adpar is located in Wales2
Adpar

 Adpar shown within Wales
OS grid reference SN309409
Principal area Ceredigion
Ceremonial county Dyfed
Country Wales
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Police Dyfed-Powys
Fire Mid and West Wales
Ambulance Welsh
EU Parliament Wales
List of places: UK • Wales • Ceredigion

Adpar, formerly Trefhedyn, is a village in Ceredigion, Wales now considered as a part of Newcastle Emlyn, which is less than a kilometre to the south, across the River Teifi in Carmarthenshire. Adpar used to be an ancient Welsh borough in its own right[1].

History

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales records a "possible medieval castle motte" within the village. The mound is low, about 3½ metres in height and damaged in subsequent periods. [2].

The first permanent printing press was established in Adpar in 1719 by Isaac Carter (printer and native of Carmarthenshire). it's believed that the first two publications from this press were Welsh language Cân o Senn i’w hen Feistr Tobacco by Alban Thomas and Cân ar Fesur Triban ynghylch Cydwybod a’i Chynheddfau. The press was transferred to Carmarthen in about 1725.[1]

The last duel that took place in Cardiganshire occurred in Adpar in 1814[1]. The last recorded use of stocks in the United Kingdom was in Adpar in 1872[3].

References

  1. ^ a b c "About Adpar". Newcastle Emlyn and Adpar / Castell Newydd Emlyn ac Adpar. http://www.newcastle-emlyn.com/adpar. Retrieved 11 Nov 2009.  
  2. ^ "ADPAR, MOTTE". Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales. 2009. http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/303776/details/ADPAR,+MOTTE/. Retrieved 11 Nov 2009.  
  3. ^ John May, Reference Wales (1994)

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