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This article incorporates text from Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897), a publication now in the public domain.

Adullam is a region of Israel near the Valley of Elah (to the south of Bet Shemesh), west of Gush Etzion. The villages of Aderet, Neve Michael/Roglit, and Aviezer are located here. In the 1950's there were plans to set up Adullam as a formal political/economic region, on the model of Lachish, but the plans were not carried out. Plans from the 1960's called for a Moshav called Adullam to be established, contiguous with Moshav Aderet, but this plan too did not materialize, and the preliminary legal framework for Moshav Adullam was dismantled a few years ago.

Adullam was also one of the royal cities of the Canaanites (Joshua 12:15; 15:35) referred to in the Hebrew Bible. It stood near the highway which later became the Roman road in the Valley of Elah, the scene of David's memorable victory over Goliath (1 Sam. 17:2), and not far from Gath. It was one of the towns which Rehoboam fortified against Egypt (2 Chronicles 11:7). Micah calls it "the glory of Israel" (Micah 1:15).

I Samuel refers to the Cave of Adullam, and reports that David, when he had been expelled from the court of King Saul, there gathered together "every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented" (1 Sam. 22:2). According to tradition this cave was at Wadi Khureitun, between Bethlehem and the Dead Sea, but there is little evidence for this view. However, the site at 'Aid-el-ma, about 4 km south of the Valley of Elah, and about 20 miles west from Bethlehem, is now more commonly accepted. At this place is a hill some 140 m high pierced with numerous caverns, some of them large enough to hold 200 or 300 men.

An Adullamite can mean an inhabitant of Adullam, and the word is used in this sense in Genesis 38:1, 12, 20. However, by reference to the passage in 1 Samuel mentioned above, it has come to mean someone who is plotting against the established leadership of a political party or other group, a group of such plotters being called a Cave of Adullam. John Bright described a 19th century plot within the leadership of the United Kingdom Liberal Party, directed against the 1866 Reform Bill, in these terms (see Adullamites).

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

ADULLAM, a Canaanitish town in the territory of the tribe of Judah, perhaps the modern 'Aid-el-Ma, 7 m. N.E. of Beit-Jibrin. It was in the stronghold ("cave" is a scribal error) of this town that David took refuge on two occasions (I Sam. xxii. 1; 2 Sam. v. 17). The tradition that Adullam is in the great cave of Khareitun (St Chariton) is probably due to the crusaders. From the description of Adullam as the resort of "every one that was in distress," or "in debt," or "discontented," it has often been humorously alluded to, notably by Sir Walter Scott,. who puts the expression into the mouth of the Baron of Bradwardine in Waverley, chap. lvii., and also of Balfour of Burley in Old Mortality. In modern political history the expression "cave of Adullam" (hence "Adullamites") came into common use (being first employed in a speech by John Bright on the 13th of March 1866) with regard to the independent attitude of Robert Lowe (Lord Sherbrooke), Edward Horsman and their Liberal supporters in opposition to the Reform Bill of 1866. But others had previously used it in a similar connexion, e.g. President Lincoln in his second electoral campaign (1864), and the Tories in allusion to the Whig remnant who joined C. J. Fox in his temporary secession. From the same usage is derived the shorter political term "cave" for any body of men who secede from their party on some special subject.


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Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

(Hebr. Adhullam, Vulg. Odollam, but Adullam in Jos., xv, 35.)


(1) A Chanaanite city, to the west of Bethlehem, at the foot of the mountains of Juda. From the hands of the Chanaanites (Gem, xxxviii, 1 sqq.) it passed into the power of Juda (Jos., xii, 15; xv, 35), was fortified by Roboam (II Par., xi, 7), mentioned by the prophet Micheas (i, 15), and after the exile re-peopled by Jews (II Esdr., xi, 30; II Mach., xii, 38).


(2) The Cave of Adullam, the shelter of David and his followers (I K., xxii, 1, 2), is situated, according to some, six miles southeast of Bethlehem, in the Wady Khareitun; but more probably near the city of Adullam.

Portions of this entry are taken from The Catholic Encyclopedia, 1907.

one of the royal cities of the Canaanites, now 'Aid-el-ma (Josh 12:15; Josh 15:35). It stood on the old Roman road in the valley of Elah, which was the scene of David's memorable victory over Goliath (1Sam 17:2), and not far from Gath. It was one of the towns which Rehoboam fortified against Egypt (2Chr 11:7). It was called "the glory of Israel" (Mic 1:15).

The Cave of Adullam has been discovered about 2 miles south of the scene of David's triumph, and about 13 miles west from Bethlehem. At this place is a hill some 500 feet high pierced with numerous caverns, in one of which David gathered together "every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented" (1Sam 22:2). Some of these caverns are large enough to hold 200 or 300 men. According to tradition this cave was at Wady Khureitun, between Bethlehem and the Dead Sea, but this view cannot be well maintained.

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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