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Advance Wars: Days of Ruin
Advance Wars 4 Cover.jpg
Developer(s) Intelligent Systems
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Series Nintendo Wars
Platform(s) Nintendo DS
Release date(s) NA January 21, 2008[1]
EU January 25, 2008[2]
AUS February 21, 2008[3]
JP TBA 2009[4]
Genre(s) Turn-based tactics
Mode(s) Single-player
Multiplayer
Online multiplayer
Rating(s) ESRB: E10+
OFLC: M
PEGI: 12+
Media Nintendo DS Game Card
Input methods DS face buttons and D-pad, touchscreen, microphone

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin (titled Advance Wars: Dark Conflict in Europe and Australia, and Famicom Wars DS 2 in Japan) is a turn-based strategy video game for the Nintendo DS handheld game console.[5] It is the fourth and latest installment in the Advance Wars series and was released in North America on January 21, 2008; in Europe on January 25, 2008; and in Australia on February 21, 2008. The game is preceded by Advance Wars: Dual Strike, Advance Wars 2: Black Hole Rising, and Advance Wars, although this series is a sub-series of the Nintendo Wars set of games, which dates back to the Nintendo Entertainment System game Famicom Wars in 1988.[6]

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin was intended to have a darker atmosphere and more serious tone in contrast to the previous installments in the series, and features a new storyline independent of the previous games.[7] Set amidst a post-apocalyptic world, the story focuses on the Rubinelle 12th Battalion, one of the surviving remnants of the military of the country of Rubinelle, which had been locked in a century-long war with its rival, Lazuria, prior to a devastating global meteor shower. In the aftermath, the Battalion devotes itself to saving any other survivors of the disaster, despite the shattered nations renewing their war against each other and an uncurable disease ravaging both sides. Meanwhile, a mysterious faction with unknown motives takes advantage of the destruction and pushes both sides deeper into conflict from behind the scenes.[8][9]

Contents

Gameplay

The objective in Days of Ruin is for the player to defeat the enemy army with their own army. Except for certain single player missions with special objectives, there are two ways to defeat an opponent: destroy all of the enemy's units or capture their headquarters. The battle system is turn-based. Two to four armies, each headed by a commanding officer (CO), take turns building and commanding units on grid-based maps. Every turn, units, which consist of ground, sea and air units, can move across the different types of terrain and attack enemy units or perform other actions, such as submerging a submarine or resupplying friendly units. Many factors can affect the battle, such as Fog of War, a phenomenon that prevents players from seeing enemy units other than those in the visual range of their units; various weather conditions; and CO powers.[9]

Gameplay in Days of Ruin.

COs and CO powers

The entire cast from the previous games has been replaced with new characters. CO powers have been toned down, and no longer have the ability to instantly change the course of a battle. Tag powers from Dual Strike, which allowed players to move twice in one turn, have been removed. Players gain CO powers much later in the campaign than before, and they have a much less significant role in overall gameplay.[10]

At the HQ or any unit-producing property, COs can join with a specific unit, and automatically promote that unit to Vet level, but at the cost of half of that unit's value. The CO's unit confers an advantage on friendly units within a certain range, the "CO zone." These effects are generally minor advantages such as attack or defense boosts. CO effects are constant and, unlike previous games, only benefit units within the CO zone.[11][12]

As damage is dealt by units within the CO zone, the CO's power meter fills slightly. As the CO power meter is filled, the CO zone grows larger. When the meter is full, the CO can activate his power which has an effect on the whole battlefield, such as repairing allied units, damaging enemy units, or temporarily altering weather conditions. If the CO unit is destroyed, the CO meter empties and the CO returns to the HQ, able to be redeployed with another unit.[9]

New units, properties, and terrain

Units can now level up in battle, increasing their capabilities. Units increase their level once for each enemy unit that they destroy. The level of each unit is identified as I, II, or Vet, with Vet being the highest level. While units with higher levels are more powerful than new units, the power increase is slight. Unit experience is not persistent, and the player begins each mission with new units.[9]

Unit prices have been readjusted and some units renamed, as well as new ones introduced. New land units include the Bike, a highly mobile infantry unit that can capture properties; the Flare, a new tank-like unit that can reveal areas affected by the Fog of War; the Anti-Tank, an indirect-fire unit strong against tanks with the ability to counter-attack during direct attacks; and the War Tank (formerly the Mega Tank), the strongest ground unit in the game. New air units include the Duster, which has the ability to attack both ground and air units; and the Seaplane, which is produced by Carriers and can attack any unit. Additionally, there is a single new sea unit, the Gunboat, which is armed with a missile salvo that must be resupplied at a Port after each use, and can transport one infantry/mech unit. Also, the Battleship was given the ability to move and fire in the same turn, making it the only indirect-combat unit able to do so.[9]

Two new units: a Duster (top) battling a Bike (bottom).

New properties have also been introduced, including temporary properties which are constructed by the Rig unit (formerly known as the APC). Temporary properties cannot build new units like other properties can, but can only be used as stationary resupply bases providing some defensive cover for units, and can be captured. Each Rig unit can construct one of two temporary properties, the Temporary Port and Temporary Airport. Additionally, the new Radar property has been added; when captured it clears a five-tile radius of Fog of War.[9]

New terrain is available in the game: Wasteland, which impedes the movement of ground vehicles; Ruins, which provide a minor defense bonus for ground units and hiding places in Fog of War; Fire, which is impassable and illuminates the surrounding area during Fog of War; Rough Sea, which impedes the movement of naval units; Mist, which provides a defense bonus and hiding places for naval units; and Meteors and Plasma. Plasma forms an impassable wall that no unit can cross, and is generated by Meteors. Once a Meteor is destroyed, any Plasma in contact with it disappears, allowing units to pass. Plasma that is not in contact with a meteor cannot be destroyed.[9][11][13][14][15]

Campaign

The campaign plays out through 26 missions, with story scenes that tie the plot together occurring between and during the battles. In addition, 38 training missions are unlocked as the missions are completed. The training missions are more challenging, are entirely optional, and can be played separately from the campaign. One new feature in Days of Ruin is that campaign missions can now be played individually as the player completes them. Like the training missions, campaign missions can be selected from the main menu at any time.[11]

Upon completing a mission, the player is awarded a rank, starting with the lowest at C and going to B, A and S, which is the highest. The ranks are based on three categories: Power, Technique, and Speed, each determined by meeting certain conditions in a battle. All three categories are rated on a scale from 0-150, and added together to form a numerical ranking from 0-450 in addition to their letter ranking; for example, any score between 300-450 earns an S ranking. Unlike previous games, the numerical score is not converted into points that can be redeemed to purchase new maps and COs; instead, COs are unlocked after the completion of certain missions and all maps are available at the beginning of gameplay.[13]

In a departure from the previous games, which included five factions in the campaign, Days of Ruin features only four: the Rubinelle 12th Battalion (Red), Lazurian Army (Blue), New Rubinelle Army (Yellow), and Intelligent Defense Systems (Black). These factions have different names in the American, European, and Japanese versions of the game.[6][16]

Multiplayer

In a first for the series, Days of Ruin includes online multiplayer over Nintendo's Wi-Fi Connection service, as well as a feature for players to share their own custom map designs and download maps made by others. Over 150 premade maps are included in the game for use in local multiplayer, and designed for two, three, and four-player matches. Multiplayer games can be played with only one DS game card: each player can pass the game to the next player when it is their turn.[17]

Designing a custom map.

Custom maps

When players create and upload their own custom maps to the Wi-Fi Connection, these maps can be tested and given approval ratings by other players from around the world. Players can download randomly selected maps from the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, or can choose maps based on their approval ratings. In order to upload a map, the player must win it once, and rate it based on its difficulty. The maximum size for uploadable maps is 10x10 tiles, and the player can only upload one at a time; if the player uploads another map, then the original one is replaced. Maps can have any dimensions between 30x30 and 5x5 tiles, and the game is able to store up to 50 custom maps.[11][12]

Online multiplayer

When using Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection for online multiplayer, the player can choose between a match with a random opponent from around the world, or a match with someone that the player has exchanged friend codes with. Worldwide matches are limited to two players, with the weather conditions being randomly generated and a map randomly chosen from a set list. Worldwide match players can choose if they want an opponent close to their skill level or to play against an opponent regardless of skill level. When playing with a friend, more options are opened up to allow greater customization of the match, such as the type of weather and the duration of the match. Voice chat is only supported when playing with a friend, and is unavailable during worldwide online play.[18]

Local multiplayer

Players also have the option of using local multiplayer, which requires that each player have his or her own DS game card and increases the limit of those who can participate to between 2-4 players. 28 classic maps from previous Advance Wars games, 70 two-player maps, 32 three-player maps, and 30 four-player maps are all playable with local multiplayer. The conditions of these maps can also be customized by the players. Also, like in previous games, there is an option to use one DS and game cart to play with up to four players. This is accomplished by passing the DS to the next player after a player has completed his/her turn.[8]

Plot

The plot of Days of Ruin is considerably darker than, and unrelated to, the plots of previous games. Almost 90% of humanity has been killed off following devastating meteor strikes which have destroyed much of civilization and caused a massive dust cloud to blot out the sun. Scattered survivors pick through the wreckage, and the remnants of several military superpowers patrol the ravaged landscape, some factions protecting the innocent while the others prey upon them.[9][19]

Following the disaster, which obliterated much of the warring nations of Rubinelle and Lazuria, a young cadet from the Rubinelle military academy named Will escapes the ruins of the academy's mess hall and is confronted by The Beast, a former sergeant gone rogue who leads a small band of raiders. Will is rescued by Brenner and Lin of Rubinelle's 12th Battalion (nicknamed "Brenner's Wolves"), and takes on the group's cause of saving as many survivors of the meteor strikes as possible. During a search, Will discovers a mysterious amnesiac who does not remember her own name, but somehow knows detailed military information. Will later dubs her Isabella, and she becomes a vital part of the battalion as they put an end to the Beast's reign of terror.[9]

One year after the meteor strikes, the 12th Battalion comes into contact with the New Rubinelle Army, and learns of the war raging between the Lazurian Army and the NRA. Brenner reluctantly sides with Greyfield, leader of the NRA, and advances on the Lazurian force, eventually defeating them at Fort Lazuria. Distraught by the ruthless execution of the Lazurian commander, Forsythe, Brenner and the 12th Battalion break the Lazurian prisoners out of an NRA internment camp before they can be executed. While the group escapes, Brenner stays behind and hides in an abandoned city to buy them some time. An infuriated Greyfield orders the use of a new weapon which completely destroys the city, killing Brenner and the NRA troops searching for him. Lin later leads a force against Greyfield, preventing the launch of a wave of deadly Caulder missiles and defeating the NRA once and for all. In the process, Lin personally shoots and kills Greyfield, avenging Brenner's death.[9]

The 12th Battalion is unexpectedly attacked soon after by Intelligent Defense Systems, a private military contractor that had secretly supported first the Lazurians, then the NRA by supplying them with weapons of mass destruction. Caulder, leader of the IDS, had taken advantage of the world's devastation to carry out horrific biological and psychological experiments that he would have been unable to undertake otherwise, such as creating and spreading a terrible new disease, the Creeper, for the sole purpose of studying the survivor's reactions. Despite numerous demoralizing attacks by IDS and its massive bomber, the Great Owl, the battalion survives and eventually pursues Caulder to his main laboratory and fortress, The Nest. In the end, Caulder is killed in the destruction of his lab, and the war is finally brought to an end. One year later, the village of New Hope, founded by the 12th Battalion after the conflict, begins to flourish in the new-found peace. The sun is seen rising above the nearby hills for the first time since the meteor strikes, giving hope of a brighter future.[9]

Development

Days of Ruin was announced as Advance Wars DS 2 during the 2007 E3 Media and Business Summit.[20] No other details for this installment were given other than the tentative name, but two months later in October a playable demo version was showcased at the Micromania Games Show in Paris, France, where the new darker style was first revealed.[21] On October 12, 2007, the game's title was officially released as Advance Wars: Days of Ruin for the North American version, with a planned shipping date of January 21, 2008; the alternate name of Advance Wars: Dark Conflict for European and Australian versions was released in early December.[22][23]

According to an interview conducted with the game's developers by 1up.com, the new direction the series was taken in was intended to "surprise" audiences and give gamers something "fresh and exciting." Nintendo North American localization lead Tim O'Leary stated that they did this because while the media and consumers were impressed by the games they felt that the game was the same thing with each installment. The developers were confused by this, believing they had changed much of the game throughout the series. In response, the developers decided to make a cosmetic change of the game, and attempted to revamp the outlook of war the series takes. They realized that Japan has a different view of war than other countries have, their titles featuring a light-hearted outlook, using pastel colors and quirky characters. To counter this, they made Days of Ruin darker, dirtier, and more somber. During development, some staple elements of the series, such as CO powers, were toned down to allow for more strategic depth, while new units like the Duster and Bike were created to increase the pace of the game. The classic "shop" mode was considered for Days of Ruin, but it was decided that an unlocking system was not compatible with the style of play of busier gamers.[7][24]

Regional differences

Dark Conflict and Famicom Wars DS 2 are identical to the North American release, Days of Ruin, in terms of the storyline, gameplay, and features. Several minor details distinguish each version, such as differences in the names of the factions, characters, and units, as well as significant dialogue changes. This is due to Nintendo of America and Nintendo of Europe receiving Japanese copies of the game to translate independently, resulting in unique versions for each region.[25]

Reception

 Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 85%
(based on 50 reviews)[26]
Metacritic 86%
(based on 55 reviews)[27]
Review scores
Publication Score
1UP.com A-[28]
Eurogamer 8.0/10[29]
Game Informer 8.75/10[30]
GamePro 4.5/5[31]
GameSpot 8.0/10[32]
IGN 8.6/10[33]
Nintendo Power 8.5/10[34]

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin has received generally positive reviews. 1UP.com praised the new turn Days of Ruin has taken for the series, but noted that the storyline, while darker than before, was still close in tone to the humor of the previous games. The new CO deployment feature was called the biggest change to the gameplay. The game was criticized for the removal of several staple features of the series, but complimented the new online play feature as being "the most balanced Advance Wars experience."[28]

Nintendo Power also gave a positive rating, calling the game "comfortingly familiar" with battles that are "more approachable than before." Online multiplayer was noted as taking "wireless connectivity and Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection further than any game that has preceded it." One of the main flaws of Days of Ruin was identified as a lack of gameplay innovation.[34]

IGN gave the game a high rating for taking risks with its artistic design, but also criticized the loss of old single-player modes in favor of new multiplayer content. The music was described as "typical video game techno-metal," and was consequently the lowest rated part of the game.[33] IGN named Advance Wars: Days of Ruin the Best Online Multiplayer Game of 2008 for the Nintendo DS.[35] The game was also a nominee for other awards from IGN, including Best Strategy Game[36] and Best Artistic Design.[37]

In North America, Days of Ruin sold over 81,000 copies in January after its release, and close to 50,300 copies in February, bringing total sales in the region to over 130,000 as of March 2008.[38]

References

  1. ^ "Nintendo of America: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Game Info". Nintendo of America. 2008-01-21. http://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/nLeg9iJkPgq3fWBcqtpDNWUJ4IvmaQBY. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  2. ^ "Nintendo of Europe: Advance Wars: Dark Conflict Game Info". Nintendo of Europe. 2008-01-25. http://www.nintendo.co.uk/NOE/en_GB/games/nds/advance_wars_dark_conflict_3188.html. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  3. ^ "Aussie Game Releases (February 18 - 23)". IGN. 2008-02-21. http://ds.ign.com/articles/852/852898p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  4. ^ Harris, Craig (May 8, 2009). "Nintendo Updates 2009 Releases". IGN.com. http://wii.ign.com/articles/981/981101p1.html. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  5. ^ Jones, George. Advance Wars: Days of Ruin: New features, multiplayer, and a dark story line make this sequel shine. 235. GamePro. p. 78.  
  6. ^ a b Shoe, Michael. Advance Wars: Days of Ruin: Nights of strategizing. 226. Electronic Gaming Monthly. p. 83.  
  7. ^ a b Hsu, Dan (2008-08-08). "Advance Wars: DoR Afterthoughts from 1UP.com". 1UP. http://www.1up.com/do/feature?pager.offset=0&cId=3166973. Retrieved 2008-08-08.  
  8. ^ a b Webster, Locke (2008-01-21). "UGO.com: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Interview". UGO.com. http://www.ugo.com/ugo/html/article/?id=18128&sectionId=2. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Intelligent Systems. Advance Wars: Days of Ruin. (Nintendo). Nintendo DS. (2008-01-21)
  10. ^ Shoemaker, Brad (2007-10-15). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin First Look - DS News at GameSpot". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/ds/strategy/advancewarsdaysofruin/news.html?sid=6181037&om_act=convert&om_clk=newlyadded&tag=newlyadded;title;1. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  11. ^ a b c d Shepperd, Chris (2007-11-20). The Path of Ruin. 223. Nintendo Power. pp. 54–58.  
  12. ^ a b Pigna, Kris (2008-01-04). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Nintendo DS Preview". 1UP. http://www.1up.com/do/previewPage?cId=3165258. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  13. ^ a b Hatfield, Daemon (2007-12-18). "IGN: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Preview". IGN. http://ds.ign.com/articles/842/842329p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  14. ^ Torres, Ricardo (2007-12-17). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Hands-On". GameSpot. http://au.gamespot.com/ds/strategy/advancewarsdaysofruin/news.html?sid=6184086&mode=recent. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  15. ^ Shoemaker, Brad (2008-01-17). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Preview Feature #2: The Changing Face of Warfare". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/ds/strategy/advancewarsdaysofruin/news.html?sid=6184842&om_act=convert&om_clk=multimodule&tag=multimodule;picks;title;2. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  16. ^ Kohler, Chris (2008-01-15). "Interview: Nintendo's 'Darker, Grittier' Advance Wars". Wired. http://blog.wired.com/games/2008/01/interview-ninte.html. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  17. ^ Harris, Craig (2007-10-15). "IGN: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Hands-On". IGN. http://au.ds.ign.com/articles/827/827344p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  18. ^ Shoemaker, Brad (2008-01-17). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Preview Feature #3: Battling Around the World". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/ds/strategy/advancewarsdaysofruin/news.html?sid=6184902&mode=previews. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  19. ^ Bianco, Karn (2007-10-11). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Revealed". Gameworld Network. http://www.gwn.com/news/story.php/id/14317/Advance_Wars_Days_of_Ruin_Revealed.html. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  20. ^ Burman, Rob (2007-07-12). "IGN: E3 2007: Advance Wars DS 2 This Year". IGN. http://ds.ign.com/articles/804/804082p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  21. ^ Hatfield, Daemon (2007-10-01). "IGN: Advance Wars 2 Playable at Paris Show". IGN. http://ds.ign.com/articles/824/824132p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  22. ^ Geddes, Ryan (2007-10-12). "IGN: New Advance Wars Gets Name, Street Date". IGN. http://ds.ign.com/articles/827/827002p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  23. ^ Greenhough, Chris (2007-12-06). "Confirmed: Advance Wars: Dark Conflict laying siege to Europe on January 25". Joystiq. http://www.dsfanboy.com/2007/12/06/confirmed-advance-wars-dark-conflict-laying-siege-to-europe-on/. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  24. ^ "Interview: Nintendo, Advance Wars, & The Art Of Localization". Gamasutra. 2008-01-23. http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=17079. Retrieved 2009-10-12.  
  25. ^ Kolan, Patrick (2008-02-20). "IGN AU: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Review". IGN. http://ds.ign.com/articles/853/853784p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  26. ^ "Game Rankings Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Reviews". Game Rankings. http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/943675.asp?q=advance%20wars%20days%20of%20ruin. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  27. ^ "Metacritic Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Reviews". Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/games/platforms/ds/advancewarsdaysofruin?q=Advance%20Wars:%20Days%20of%20Ruin. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  
  28. ^ a b Hsu, Dan (2008-01-18). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Review from 1UP". 1UP. http://www.1up.com/do/reviewPage?cId=3165528. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  29. ^ Bramwell, Tom (2008-01-23). "Advance Wars: Dark Conflict Review from Eurogamer". Eurogamer. http://www.eurogamer.net/article.php?article_id=91232. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  30. ^ Biessner, Adam (2008-01-21). "Game Informer Online: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Review". Game Informer. http://gameinformer.com/Games/Review/200803/R08.0122.1607.09030.htm. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  31. ^ Jones, George (2008-01-22). "Review: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin for DS on GamePro.com". GamePro. http://www.gamepro.com/nintendo/ds/games/reviews/157948.shtml. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  32. ^ Davis, Ryan (2008-01-29). "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin for DS GameSpot Review". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/ds/strategy/advancewarsdaysofruin/review.html?sid=6185280&om_act=convert&om_clk=multimodule&tag=multimodule;picks;title;3. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  33. ^ a b Hatfield, Daemon (2008-01-21). "IGN: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Review". IGN. http://ds.ign.com/articles/846/846648p1.html. Retrieved 2008-12-23.  
  34. ^ a b Shepperd, Chris (2008-01-20). Apocalypse Wow. 225. Nintendo Power. p. 86.  
  35. ^ "IGN DS: Best Online Multiplayer Game of 2008". IGN. 2008-12-15. http://bestof.ign.com/2008/ds/18.html. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  36. ^ "IGN DS: Best Strategy Game 2008". IGN. 2008-12-15. http://bestof.ign.com/2008/ds/11.html. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  37. ^ "IGN DS: Best Artistic Design 2008". IGN. 2008-12-15. http://bestof.ign.com/2008/ds/13.html. Retrieved 2008-12-19.  
  38. ^ Red, Carmine (2008-03-14). "Nintendo DS Sells 587k, Wii 432k in February". Nintendo World Report. http://nintendoworldreport.com/newsArt.cfm?artid=15556. Retrieved 2008-12-20.  

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin
Box artwork for Advance Wars: Days of Ruin.
Developer(s) Intelligent Systems
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Release date(s)
 2009 (TBA)
Genre(s) Turn-based strategy
System(s) Nintendo DS
Mode(s) Single player, Multiplayer
Rating(s)
ESRB: Everyone 10+
OFLC: Mature
PEGI: Ages 12+
Preceded by Dual Strike
Series Advance Wars

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin (titled Advance Wars: Dark Conflict in Europe and Australia, and Famicom Wars DS 2 in Japan) is a turn-based strategy video game for the Nintendo DS handheld game console. It is the fourth and latest installment in the Advance Wars series and was released in North America on January 21, 2008; in Europe on January 25, 2008; and in Australia on February 21, 2008. The game is preceded by Advance Wars: Dual Strike, Advance Wars 2: Black Hole Rising, and Advance Wars, although this series is a sub-series of the Famicom Wars set of games, which dates back to the NES game Famicom Wars in 1988.

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin was intended to have a darker atmosphere and more serious tone in contrast to the previous installments in the series, and features a new storyline independent of the previous games. Set amidst a post-apocalyptic world, the story focuses on the Rubinelle 12th Battalion, one of the surviving remnants of the military of the country of Rubinelle, which had been locked in a century-long war with its rival, Lazuria, prior to a devastating global meteor shower. In the aftermath, the Battalion devotes itself to saving any other survivors of the disaster, despite the shattered nations renewing their war against each other and an uncurable disease ravaging both sides. Meanwhile, a mysterious faction with unknown motives takes advantage of the destruction and pushes both sides deeper into conflict from behind the scenes.

A terrible asteroid strike has left the planet devastated. Few survivors remain and the world is in chaos. Toxic clouds are choking out the food supply. New diseases strike without warning. Terror runs rampant as people do whatever necessary for their own survival.

One small band fights to restore human dignity in a world gone mad… but the mission seems impossible. Their own country is being led by madmen. Their former enemy thinks only of revenge. And behind the scenes, a mad scientist with unbelievable power dreams of eliminating the human race once and for all.

Table of Contents

Getting Started
  • Controls
  • Modes
  • Story Mode Characters
  • Multiplayer
  • Strategies & Tips
Appendices
  • COs
  • Units
  • Terrain
  • Weather
  • Regional Differences
Walkthrough
  1. Days of Ruin
  2. A Single Life
  3. Freehaven
  4. Moving On
  5. New Allies
  6. Fear Experiment
  7. A Kind of Home
  8. A New Threat
  9. The Beast
  1. Almost Home
  2. A Storm Brews
  3. History of Hate
  4. Greyfield Strikes
  5. A Hero's Farewell
  6. Icy Retreat
  7. Hope Rising
  8. The Creeper
  9. Panic In The Ranks
  1. Salvation
  2. Waylon Flies Again
  3. Lin's Gambit
  4. The Great Owl
  5. Sacrificial Lamb
  6. Crash Landing
  7. Lab Rats
  8. Sunrise

editAdvance Wars seriesFamicom Wars

Advance Wars  · Black Hole Rising  · Dual Strike  · Days of Ruin


Simple English

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin
Developer(s) Intelligent Systems
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Series Wars
Platform(s) Nintendo DS
Release date(s) NA January 21, 2008[1]
EU January 25, 2008[2]
AUS February 21, 2008[3]
JP TBA 2008
Genre(s) Turn-based tactics
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer, online multiplayer
Rating(s) ESRB: E10+
PEGI: 12+
OFLC: M
Media Nintendo DS Game Card
Input methods DS Face Buttons and D-pad, Touchscreen, Microphone

Advance Wars: Days of Ruin, known in PAL regions as Advance Wars: Dark Conflict and in Japan as Famicom Wars DS 2, is a turn-based tactics video game made by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS game console.[4] It's a lot different from other games in the series, which are cartoony, while this is gritty and realistic.

References

  1. Nintendo of America: Advance Wars: Days of Ruin Game Info
  2. Nintendo of Europe: Advance Wars: Dark Conflict Game Info
  3. IGN: Aussie Game Releases (February 18 - 23)
  4. George Jones, "Advance Wars: Days of Ruin: New features, multiplayer, and a dark story line make this sequel shine," GamePro 235 (April 08): 78.








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