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Examples
  • The waves came in quickly over the rocks.
  • I found the film incredibly dull.
  • The meeting went well, and the directors were extremely happy with the outcome!
  • Crabs are known for walking sideways.
  • I often have eggs for breakfast.
  • However, I shall not eat fried eggs again.
.An adverb is a part of speech.^ Traditionally, the part of speech which qualifies a verb: some important semantic classes of adverbs are manner , time , place .
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

.It is any word that modifies any part of language other than a noun (modifiers of nouns are primarily adjectives and determiners).^ It's French ( merde ) -- but close to what you'd say in just about any other Romance language as a common word for excreta.

^ Adverbs which modify adjectives and other adverbs Adverbs which modify adjectives or other adverbs usually immediately precede the words they modify.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ The thing about those nouns and adjectives that end in -a for both genders is that most of them came from the Greek language, where they are masculine.
  • Bottle of Water - Discussion 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC spanishpod.com [Source type: General]

.Adverbs can modify verbs, adjectives (including numbers), clauses, sentences and other adverbs.^ In this sentence on is an adverb, modifying the verb walked.

^ In this sentence Hard is an adverb modifying the verb tried.

^ Intensifiers An adverb which is used to modify adjectives and adverbs, but which is not usually used to modify verbs, can be referred to as an intensifier .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

.Adverbs typically answer questions such as how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent?.^ Object and Puzzle Dependencies || || [OAPD] || || || ()===========================================================================() This section tries to list all the main dependencies in the game; it tries to answer questions such as "to do THIS, what do I have to have done first?".
  • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

^ Adverbs of time Adverbs of time answer the question When?
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ This question is usually answered by a phrase or clause, rather than by a single-word adverb.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

.In English, they often end in -ly.^ Adverbs of location, and adverb phrases and clauses of location, most often occupy the end position of a clause, where they precede adverbs of time and adverbs of purpose.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Adverbs of manner most often occupy the end position of a clause, where they follow an intransitive verb, or the direct object of a transitive verb.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

.This function is called the adverbial function, and is realized not just by single words (i.e., adverbs) but by adverbial phrases and adverbial clauses.^ This question is usually answered by a phrase or clause, rather than by a single-word adverb.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Verbs may be modified not only by single-word adverbs, but also by adverb phrases and clauses.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ A dependent clause which functions as an adverb of time.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

An adverb may be a sentence element in its own right:
They treated her well.
Alternatively, an adverb may be contained within a sentence element (here part of the subject element):
An extremely tall woman entered the room.

Contents

Adverbs in English

.In English, adverbs of manner (answering the question how?) are often formed by adding -ly to adjectives.^ Adverbs of location Adverbs of location answer the question Where?
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Many adverbs of manner have the ending ly .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Adverbs of time Adverbs of time answer the question When?
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

For example, great yields greatly, and beautiful yields beautifully. .(Note that some words that end in -ly, such as friendly and lovely, are not adverbs, but adjectives, in which case the root word is usually a noun.^ Many adverbs of manner have the ending ly .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Words which are used to modify verbs or adjectives are usually referred to as adverbs .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ In these examples, the adverbs often and usually follow the word not .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

There are also underived adjectives that end in -ly, such as holy and silly.)
The suffix -ly is related to the Germanic word "lich" meaning corpse or body. .(There is also an obsolete English word lych or lich with the same meaning.^ A word meaning the same as another.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Double negatives In modern English, there is a rule that a clause containing one negative word expresses a negative meaning, but a clause containing two negative words expressed an affirmative meaning.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ In some dialects of English, clauses containing two negative words may be used to express a negative meaning.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

) Both words are also related to the word like. The connection between -ly and like is easy to understand. The connection to lich is probably that both are descended from an earlier word that meant something like "shape" or "form".[1]
In this way, -ly in English is cognate with the common German adjective ending -lich and the Dutch ending -lijk. This same process is followed in Romance languages with the ending -mente, -ment, or -mense meaning "of/like the mind".
.In some cases, the suffix -wise may be used to derive adverbs from nouns.^ Inverted word order When used with a verb of motion, an adverb or adverb phrase of location may be placed at the beginning of a clause, followed immediately by the verb, followed by the noun subject of the verb.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Your use of the Site is subject to all applicable local, state, national laws and regulations and, in some cases, international treaties.
  • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]
  • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - End Credits | SPIKE 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ In some dialects of English, clauses containing two negative words may be used to express a negative meaning.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

Historically, -wise competed with a related form -ways and won out against it. In a few words, like sideways, -ways survives; words like clockwise show the transition. .Again, it is not a foolproof indicator of a word being an adverb.^ There used as an introductory word In addition to being used to indicate location, there can also be used as an introductory word, in clauses indicating the existence of something.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

.Some adverbs are formed from nouns or adjectives by appending the prefix a- (such as abreast, astray).^ Morphological definition (morphological case): the distinctive inflected forms of a noun which correlate with such semantic functions.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

.There are a number of other suffixes in English that derive adverbs from other word classes, and there are also many adverbs that are not morphologically indicated at all.^ A foreign word is made to look like a morphological derivative of the host language, e.g.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Spanish and English distinguish singular and plural number morphologically.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ The idea that there are also many good people, and good things happen often as well, is an all to easily avoidable fact of life.
  • Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) …review and/or viewer comments | Christian Spotlight™ on the Movies | ChristianAnswers.Net 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.christiananswers.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Gerunds can function as adverbs in English when used in a construction known as verbal hendiadys.^ (In English, the cognate form in -ing is traditionally variously known as a gerund, a gerundive or a present participle depending on its function.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ In modern linguistics, the term is also (and predominantly) used to denote a clause (or a clause-equivalent such as an infinitive or gerund ) which functions as the subject, object or prepositional object of a verb.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

This usage is more common in Semitic languages, but is attested in English vernacular expressions such as "He was hopping mad." The most common usage of verbal hendiadys in English occurs with profanity, as in "He was fucking mad."
.Comparative adverbs include more, most, least, and less (in phrases such as more beautiful, most easily etc.^ Adverbs of location, and adverb phrases and clauses of location, most often occupy the end position of a clause, where they precede adverbs of time and adverbs of purpose.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Negative adverbs Negative adverbs include adverbs with an explicit negative meaning, such as never , not and nowhere , as well as adverbs with an implied negative meaning, such as hardly , scarcely and seldom .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Most websites don’t focus on their topic well, and so keyword lists containing 50 or more phrases per page are recommended.

).
.The usual form pertaining to adjectives or adverbs is called the positive.^ Adverbs of time usually occupy either the beginning position or the end position of a clause.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Adverb phrases and clauses of purpose usually occupy the end position of a clause, and follow any other adverbs, or adverb phrases or clauses.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ It should be noted that the adverbs daily , weekly , monthly , yearly and annually usually do not occupy the middle position of a clause.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

Formally, adverbs in English are inflected in terms of comparison, just like adjectives. .The comparative and superlative forms of some (especially single-syllable) adverbs that do not end in -ly are generated by adding -er and -est (She ran faster; He jumps highest).^ Many adverbs of manner have the ending ly .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ The general rules for adverbs in the middle of sentences: -before an action verb -after a form of be -between the auxiliary and the action verb Now, where do you put the adverb if there are two auxiliaries?
  • Adverb Placement - Absolute Write Water Cooler 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC absolutewrite.com [Source type: General]

^ The story does tend to jump form one scene to another quite quickly and at some points I found myself thinking the events to be a little random.
  • Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) …review and/or viewer comments | Christian Spotlight™ on the Movies | ChristianAnswers.Net 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.christiananswers.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Others, especially those ending -ly, are periphrastically compared by the use of more or most (She ran more quickly).^ I didn’t think there were any frightening scenes (compared to other children’s films) and the ending had a bit of hope (unlike the books).
  • Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) …review and/or viewer comments | Christian Spotlight™ on the Movies | ChristianAnswers.Net 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.christiananswers.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Elements usually stayed with moderate atmosphere, and some scenes used those aspects better than others.
  • Lemony Snicket's A Series Of Unfortunate Events: Collector's Edition (2004) 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.dvdmg.com [Source type: General]

^ The difference between the Imperfect and Preterite tenses in Spanish is usually thought of as an aspectual difference, though several other verb-forms, and especially the periphrastic verb-forms, have aspectual values.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

Adverbs also take comparisons with as ... as, less, and least. Not all adverbs are comparable; for example in the sentence He wore red yesterday it does not make sense to speak of "more yesterday" or "most yesterday".

Adverbs as a "catch-all" category

.Adverbs are considered a part of speech in traditional English grammar and are still included as a part of speech in grammar taught in schools and used in dictionaries.^ One of the traditional parts of speech.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ I still have tons of homework to do, mainly a speech/presentation for English.
  • Aneesah’s Hideaway » A Series of Unfortunate Events 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC aneesah.pixelled.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Part of the reason for this is the tradition including Colette and Victor Hugo .

.However, modern grammarians recognize that words traditionally grouped together as adverbs serve a number of different functions.^ A group of words which have the same function as a verb, e.g.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Functional classes of words: tose traditionally distinguished are nouns, adjectives, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions and conjunctions.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

.Some would go so far as to call adverbs a "catch-all" category that includes all words that do not belong to one of the other parts of speech.^ One of the traditional parts of speech.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ One of the basic categories of speech sound.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ How would you like to go out for some sodas?
  • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

.A more logical approach to dividing words into classes relies on recognizing which words can be used in a certain context.^ Use of more than one word to express a grammatical notion, e.g.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ An expression which uses more words than are strictly necessary to convey an idea.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Glaucus : A Sunny utterance that as usual contains more meaning in a single word in context than most people's conversation will contain in an entire day.

For example, a noun is a word that can be inserted in the following template to form a grammatical sentence:
The _____ is red. (For example, "The hat is red".)
When this approach is taken, it is seen that adverbs fall into a number of different categories. .For example, some adverbs can be used to modify an entire sentence, whereas others cannot.^ Words which are used to modify adverbs can also be referred to as adverbs .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ In this example, the adverb very modifies the adverb quickly .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ This is the entire and exclusive Agreement between you and us regarding use of the Site and it cannot be modified, except as specifically described below in Section 2.
  • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]
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Even when a sentential adverb has other functions, the meaning is often not the same. .For example, in the sentences She gave birth naturally and Naturally, she gave birth, the word naturally has different meanings.^ Similarly, the meaning of the second example could be correctly expressed by either of the following sentences:       He told nobody the secret.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Thus, the meaning of the first example could be correctly expressed by either of the following sentences:       I'm saying nothing about it.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

.(Actually the first sentence could be interpreted in the same way as the second, but context makes it clear which is meant.^ For the Butterfly, let the first platform sink a fair way then jump to the second and up to catch the Butterfly to the right; reverse this (i.e.
  • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

^ Jump on the first and let it sink almost all way then jump to the second and almost immediately to the third.
  • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

^ Drop down the other side and jump over a second, taller, building the same way.
  • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

) .Naturally as a sentential adverb means something like "of course" and as a verb-modifying adverb means "in a natural manner". This "naturally" controversy demonstrates that the class of sentential adverbs is a closed class (there is resistance to adding new words to the class), whereas the class of adverbs that modify verbs isn't.^ Words which are used to modify adverbs can also be referred to as adverbs .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Words which are used to modify verbs or adjectives are usually referred to as adverbs .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ A natural class of related meanings, e.g.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

.Words like very and particularly afford another useful example.^ As shown in these examples, inverted word order must be used, with the subject following the Simple Past or Simple Present of the verb to be , or the first auxiliary.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Another extreme example would be which I also used somewhere else, because this is something that I know would be writing a book about Jew who eats Christian babies for breakfast.
  • Do authors have ethical responsibilities beyond the book? | Dear Author: Romance Novel Reviews, Industry News, and Commentary 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC dearauthor.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The following words are commonly used as intensifiers:       fairly       quite       rather       so       too       very In addition, the word really is often used as an intensifier in informal English.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

We can say Perry is very fast, but not Perry very won the race. .These words can modify adjectives but not verbs.^ Words which are used to modify verbs or adjectives are usually referred to as adverbs .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ As shown in these examples, inverted word order must be used, with the subject following the Simple Past or Simple Present of the verb to be , or the first auxiliary.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Intensifiers An adverb which is used to modify adjectives and adverbs, but which is not usually used to modify verbs, can be referred to as an intensifier .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

.On the other hand, there are words like here and there that cannot modify adjectives.^ There were other things that were clothing purchases that seemed to be police-relatedclothing purchases, things like thatwhere you were actually indicted on those along with the stuff regarding the women.
  • Eddie: Baltimore�s Former Police Commissioner Speaks�the Second of a Two-Part Series | Baltimore City Paper 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.citypaper.com [Source type: General]

^ In any case you seem to be suggesting that really needn't be used cuz on account of there are so many other words to play with instead.
  • Adverb Placement - Absolute Write Water Cooler 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC absolutewrite.com [Source type: General]

^ Sometimes it just feels like you've been teleported up the road--a moment ago you were back there, and suddenly you're up here!
  • Maastricht to Tuscany: A series of unfortunate events - ADVrider 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.advrider.com [Source type: General]

.We can say The sock looks good there but not It is a there beautiful sock.^ It ends, I believe, with Lemony Snicket saying that there are many bad people in the world, but there are also many good people.
  • Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) …review and/or viewer comments | Christian Spotlight™ on the Movies | ChristianAnswers.Net 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.christiananswers.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Reply kakakaa Unregistered i have to say, after looking at your travel plan, YOU ARE GOOD, MAN! .
  • kennysia.com: A Series Of Unfortunate Events From London To Paris 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.kennysia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Because being able to look at myself in the mirror and feel good about what I see there is, in the end, more important than what’s in my bank account.
  • Do authors have ethical responsibilities beyond the book? | Dear Author: Romance Novel Reviews, Industry News, and Commentary 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC dearauthor.com [Source type: Original source]

.The fact that many adverbs can be used in more than one of these functions can confuse this issue, and it may seem like splitting hairs to say that a single adverb is really two or more words that serve different functions.^ Use of more than one word to express a grammatical notion, e.g.
  • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Words which are used to modify adverbs can also be referred to as adverbs .
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ Adverbs are used in fiction, whether we like them not.
  • Adverb Placement - Absolute Write Water Cooler 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC absolutewrite.com [Source type: General]

.However, this distinction can be useful, especially considering adverbs like naturally that have different meanings in their different functions.^ Connecting adverbs Adverbs such as however , nevertheless and therefore are often used to connect the ideas expressed by the clauses in which they occur to ideas expressed in previous clauses.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ However, this use of the double negative is considered to be grammatically incorrect in standard English.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

^ However, in formal English, it is considered preferable not to use split infinitives.
  • English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC www.wordpower.ws [Source type: Reference]

Huddleston distinguishes between a word and a lexicogrammatical-word.[2]
Not is an interesting case. Grammarians have a difficult time categorizing it, and it probably belongs in its own class (Haegeman 1995, Cinque 1998).

Other languages

Other languages may form adverbs in different ways, if they are used at all:
.
  • In Dutch and German, adverbs have the basic form of their corresponding adjectives and are not inflected (except for comparison in which case they are inflected like adjectives, too).^ They ask you questions about race and notorious cases like Louima and [NYPD shooting victim Amadou] Diallo.
    • Eddie: Baltimore�s Former Police Commissioner Speaks�the Second of a Two-Part Series | Baltimore City Paper 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.citypaper.com [Source type: General]

    ^ "They're different animals, but Eternal Sunshine to me is a different kind of animal, but basically, in the case of Eternal Sunshine, the script is the star.
    • Jim Carrey - Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.femail.com.au [Source type: General]

    .Consequently, German primary-school teaching uses a single term, Eigenschaftswort, to refer to both adjectives and adverbs.^ The Spanish forms in -ndo are not adjectival, and are usually called the gerund ; the term present participle is sometimes used for Spanish adjectives in -nte ( interesante ), but not all verbs have forms in -nte (e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    However German linguists avoid this term.
  • In Scandinavian languages, adverbs are typically derived from adjectives by adding the suffix '-t', which makes it identical to the adjective's neuter form. Scandinavian adjectives, like English ones, are inflected in terms of comparison by adding '-ere'/'-are' (comparative) or '-est'/'-ast' (superlative). In inflected forms of adjectives the '-t' is absent. .Periphrastic comparison is also possible.
  • In Romance languages many adverbs are formed from adjectives (often the feminine form) by adding '-mente' (Portuguese, Spanish, Italian) or '-ment' (French, Catalan) (from Latin mens, mentis: mind, intelligence).^ It's French ( merde ) -- but close to what you'd say in just about any other Romance language as a common word for excreta.

    .Other adverbs are single forms which are invariable.
  • In the Romanian language, the vast majority of adverbs are simply the masculine singular form of the corresponding adjective – one notable exception being bine ("well") / bun ("good").^ Many oppositions identified in language are binary (ie involving two terms), such as singular/plural, masculine/feminine, etc.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Rosebud : One of the most famous one-word lines in cinema (the others being Plastics!, Mother?

    ^ One of the non-finite forms of the verb, used in compound forms of the verb and adjectivally.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    .However, there are some Romanian adverbs that are built from certain masculine singular nouns using the suffix "-eşte", such as the following ones: băieţ-eşte (boyishly), tiner-eşte (youthfully), bărbăt-eşte (manly), frăţ-eşte (brotherly), etcaetara.
  • Interlingua also forms adverbs by adding '-mente' to the adjective.^ There is one shortcoming, however, and that gives rise to Unfortunate Event #3: the door into the apartment is apparently TT-sized.
    • Maastricht to Tuscany: A series of unfortunate events - ADVrider 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.advrider.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Many oppositions identified in language are binary (ie involving two terms), such as singular/plural, masculine/feminine, etc.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Aunt Josephine ...And therefore, to indicate possession, end a singular noun with an apostrophe followed by an 's'.
    • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

    .If an adjective ends in c, the adverbial ending is '-amente'. A few short, invariable adverbs, such as ben, "well", and mal, "badly", are available and widely used.
  • In Esperanto, adverbs are not formed from adjectives but are made by adding '-e' directly to the word root.^ Malware -- short for MALicious softWARE -- is a term used to broadly classify a form of software which is installed in a computer system with malicious intentions, usually without the owner's knowledge or permission.
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - End Credits | SPIKE 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The use of a single word inflected form to express a grammatical notion, e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ One of the non-finite forms of the verb, used in compound forms of the verb and adjectivally.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    .Thus, from bon are derived bone, "well", and 'bona', 'good'. See also: special Esperanto adverbs.
  • Modern Standard Arabic forms adverbs by adding the indefinite accusative ending '-an' to the root.^ See-- I built that around an adverb, and its a really weak paragraph, particularly at the ending, because I'm telling the audience how he left--and the adverb is a part of that.
    • Adverb Placement - Absolute Write Water Cooler 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC absolutewrite.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The Mortmain Mountains : Like memento mori (above) anytime you see the "mort-" root you should figure it is not a good thing.

    ^ Because being able to look at myself in the mirror and feel good about what I see there is, in the end, more important than what’s in my bank account.
    • Do authors have ethical responsibilities beyond the book? | Dear Author: Romance Novel Reviews, Industry News, and Commentary 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC dearauthor.com [Source type: Original source]

    .For example, kathiir-, "many", becomes kathiiran "much". However, Arabic often avoids adverbs by using a cognate accusative plus an adjective.
  • Austronesian languages appear to form comparative adverbs by repeating the root (as in WikiWiki), similarly to the plural noun.
  • Japanese forms adverbs from verbal adjectives by adding /ku/ (く) to the stem (e.g.^ Adjectives are often said to be qualified by adverbs too: e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Otherwise, the noun's form seems plural.
    • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

    ^ An example is that the first letter is an E, juxtaposed against a card from Snicket to Beatrice, in which a map Snicket had drawn forms an E. The cardstock letters appear to be an anagram of 'Beatrice Sank'.
    • A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    haya- "rapid" hayai "quick/early", hayakatta "was quick", hayaku "quickly") and from nominal adjectives by placing /ni/ (に) after the adjective instead of the copula /na/ (な) or /no/ (の) (e.g. rippa "splendid", rippa ni "splendidly"). .These derivations are quite productive but there are a few adjectives from which adverbs may not be derived.
  • In Gaelic, an adverbial form is made by preceding the adjective with the preposition go (Irish) or gu (Scottish Gaelic), meaning 'until'.
  • In Modern Greek, an adverb is most commonly made by adding the endings <-α> and/or <-ως> to the root of an adjective.^ There are few sounds in this world that please me quite as much as to be working at the children's reference desk of my library and to hear a parent's reaction to the title of this book.
    • Amazon.com: Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography (9780060007195): Lemony Snicket: Books 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Each Promotion may have Additional Terms and/or Rules which will be posted or otherwise made available to you and, for purposes of each Promotion, will be deemed incorporated into and form a part of this Agreement.
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Most of them seem to originate in 1932, but there are 1960s shots, Victorian era prints, and some pictures of Lemony that must have been made relatively recently.
    • Amazon.com: Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography (9780060007195): Lemony Snicket: Books 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

    .Often, the adverbs formed from a common root using each of these endings have slightly different meanings.^ There's no discernible difference in meaning between these: He quickly ran , He ran quickly, and Quickly, he ran.
    • Adverb Placement - Absolute Write Water Cooler 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC absolutewrite.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Tense is also used more generally to denote the different forms of a verb (e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Spanish because these forms are not used in any other function.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    So, <τέλειος> (<téleios>, meaning "perfect" and "complete") yields <τέλεια> (<téleia>, "perfectly") and <τελείως> (<teleíos>, "completely"). .Not all adjectives can be transformed into adverbs by using both endings.^ Once you have all three Butterflies, have Sunny drag the Drum close to the left-hand end of the branch and use it to get to another branch above and to the left, where you'll find the sixth Butterfly.
    • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The seventh and eighth Butterflies are both on the roof at the end of the circuit and are easy enough to get -- at the end you should have all nine.
    • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The Spanish forms in -ndo are not adjectival, and are usually called the gerund ; the term present participle is sometimes used for Spanish adjectives in -nte ( interesante ), but not all verbs have forms in -nte (e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    <Γρήγορος> (<grígoros>, "rapid") becomes <γρήγορα> (<grígora>, "rapidly"), but not normally *<γρηγόρως> (*<grigóros>). .When the <-ως> ending is used to transform an adjective whose tonal accent is on the third syllable from the end, such as <επίσημος> (<epísimos>, "official"), the corresponding adjective is accented on the second syllable from the end; compare <επίσημα> (<epísima>) and <επισήμως> (<episímos>), which both mean "officially". There are also other endings with particular and restricted use as <-ί>, <-εί>, <-ιστί>, etc.^ When we use the term " Other Information ", we mean any information other than Personal Information collected by the Site (Personal Information and Other Information, together, the " Information ").
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - End Credits | SPIKE 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Traditionally, the part of speech that governs nouns, pronouns and other elements used nominally, expressing notions such as direction, instrument, agent, etc.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ We will not share any Personal Information with Advertisers or other third party marketers unless you opt-in to such disclosure.
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - End Credits | SPIKE 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    .For example, <ατιμωρητί> (<atimorití>, "with impunity") and <ασυζητητί> (<asyzitití>, "indisputably"); <αυτολεξεί> (<autolexeí> "word for word") and <αυτοστιγμεί> (<autostigmeí>, "in no time"); <αγγλιστί> [<anglistí> "in English (language)"] and <παπαγαλιστί> (<papagalistí>, "by rote"); etc.
  • In Latvian, an adverb is formed from an adjective, by changing the masculine or feminine adjective endings -s and -a to -i.^ Many oppositions identified in language are binary (ie involving two terms), such as singular/plural, masculine/feminine, etc.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Georgina Orwell : Oh how I love the works of George Orwell , which include the classic Politics and the English Language , Animal Farm , and 1984 , from which we get the adjective Orwellian.

    ^ This time most of them take the form of the words uttered by Sunny Baudelaire the baby that is no larger than a salami.
    • A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    ."Labs", meaning "good", becomes "labi" for "well". Latvian adverbs have a particular use in expressions meaning "to speak" or "to understand" a language.^ You make a good point that adverbs don't have to be used.
    • Adverb Placement - Absolute Write Water Cooler 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC absolutewrite.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A variety of language used for a particular purpose, e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Use of a native element to model a word or expression taken from a foreign language.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    .Rather than use the noun meaning "Latvian/English/Russian", the adverb formed form these words is used.^ When we use the term " Other Information ", we mean any information other than Personal Information collected by the Site (Personal Information and Other Information, together, the " Information ").
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - Theatrical Trailer | SPIKE 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]
    • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events - End Credits | SPIKE 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ He pleaded guilty to two counts related to spending from a Baltimore Police Department supplemental fund on items that were for personal use rather than for police-related activities.
    • Eddie: Baltimore�s Former Police Commissioner Speaks�the Second of a Two-Part Series | Baltimore City Paper 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.citypaper.com [Source type: General]

    ^ (Stop using such big words Klaus and tell us what it means.
    • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

    ."Es runāju latviski/angliski/krieviski" means "I speak Latvian/English/Russian", or very literally "I speak Latvianly/Englishly/Russianly". When a noun is required, the expression used means literally "language of the Latvians/English/Russians", "latviešu/angļu/krievu valoda".
  • In Ukrainian, an adverb is formed by removing the adjectival suffices "-ий" "-а" or "-е" from an adjective, and replacing them with the adverbial "-о". For example, "швидкий", "гарна", and "смачне" (fast, nice, tasty) become "швидко", "гарно", and "смачно" (quickly, nicely, tastefully).^ One of the non-finite forms of the verb, used in compound forms of the verb and adjectivally.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ But in Spanish, adjectives are often used as nouns ( el viejo 'the old man'), and in colloquial register sometimes as adverbs ( va muy rápido 'it goes very quickly').
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    ^ An example of grammaticalisation is when a periphrastic construction loses its literal meaning; the Spanish future tense is an example of a fully grammaticalised construction while the use of ir + past participle appears to be partially grammaticalised.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    .As well, note that adverbs are mostly placed before the verbs they modify: "Добрий син гарно співає."^ Traditionally, the part of speech which qualifies a verb: some important semantic classes of adverbs are manner , time , place .
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    (A good son sings nicely/well). .Although, there is no specific word order in east slavic languages.
  • In Korean, adverbs are formed by replacing 다 of the dictionary form of a verb with 게.^ As you walk through the gate, the words "OCEAN'S EDGE" appear at the bottom of the screen (NOTE -- there is NO Interaction Icon shown).
    • GameFAQs: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (GBA) FAQ/Walkthrough by cthrag yaska 10 February 2010 10:41 UTC www.gamefaqs.com [Source type: General]

    ^ This time most of them take the form of the words uttered by Sunny Baudelaire the baby that is no larger than a salami.
    • A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket 3 February 2010 16:27 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Used of a verb-form which consists of more than one word, e.g.
    • Glossary of linguistic terms 31 January 2010 12:012 UTC webspace.qmul.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

    So, 쉽다 (easy) becomes 쉽게 (easily).
  • In Turkish, the same word usually serves as adjective and adverb: iyi bir kız ("a good girl"), iyi anlamak ("to understand well).

References

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary Online; entry on lich, etymology section.
  2. ^ Huddleston, Rodney (1988). English grammar: an outline. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 7. doi:10.2277/0521311527. ISBN 0521323118. 
  • Cinque, Guglielmo. 1999. Adverbs and functional heads -- a cross linguistic perspective. Oxford: Oxford University press.
  • Ernst, Thomas. 2002. The syntax of adjuncts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Haegeman, Liliane. 1995. The syntax of negation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Jackendoff, Ray. 1972. Semantic Interpretation in Generative Grammar. MIT Press,

See also

External links


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also adverb

Contents

German

Pronunciation

Noun

Adverb n.
  1. adverb

Declension

case singular plural
nominative Adverb Adverbien
genitive Adverbs Adverbien
dative Adverb Adverbien
accusative Adverb Adverbien

Synonyms


Simple English

An adverb is a word used to tell more about a verb, and it almost always answers the questions how?, when?, where?, how often?, and in what way?. Words like slowly, loudly, carefully, quickly, or sadly are all adverbs. Adverbs usually, but not always, end in -ly.

Examples of adverbs in a sentence (with the adverb in italics):

  • How did the man walk? The man walked slowly.
  • How did the dogs bark? The dogs barked loudly.

An adverb can also modify (describe) an adjective or another adverb.

Examples:

Adverb modifying a verb: He writes well

Adverb modifying another adverb: He writes very well

Adverb modifying an adjective: He is very well

In the first two examples the word 'well' is an adverb. In the last example, it is an adjective. This is one example in which the same word can be both an adjective and an adverb but not in the same sentence.

As a rule, the same word can play different roles but not in the same sentence. It all depends on what the word is doing in the sentence. It could be a noun, an adjective, an adverb, a verb, etc. Example: take the word 'cool'. In the sentence, "he walks cool", the word 'cool' is an adverb. In the sentence, "cool the hot dish", the word 'cool' is a verb. In the sentence, "it is a cool evening", the word 'cool' is an adjective. In the first example, "he walks cool", the word 'cool' really means 'coolly' as in "play it cool" (do not get excited; be calm).

Adverb form

Most adverbs are formed by adding ly to the end of an adjective. To see 100 adjectives used in Basic English, click here ---> : adjective

Ext Links

Wikipedia: Adverb



Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 21, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Adverb, which are similar to those in the above article.








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