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Agave
Agave americana
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Agavaceae
Genus: Agave
L.
Species

see text. See also full listing.

Agave (pronounced /əˈɡɑːveɪ/[1] or /əˈɡeɪviː/[2]) is a succulent plant of a large botanical genus of the same name, belonging to the family Agavaceae.

Contents

Description

Chiefly Mexican, agaves occur also in the southern and western United States and in central and tropical South America. The plants have a large rosette of thick fleshy leaves, each ending generally in a sharp point and with a spiny margin; the stout stem is usually short, the leaves apparently springing from the root. Along with plants from the related genus Yucca, various Agave species are popular ornamental plants.

Each rosette is monocarpic and grows slowly to flower only once. During flowering, a tall stem or "mast" grows from the center of the leaf rosette and bears a large number of shortly tubular flowers. After development of fruit, the original plant dies, but suckers are frequently produced from the base of the stem, which become new plants.

It is a common misconception that agaves are cacti. Agaves are closely related to the lily and amaryllis families, and are not related to cacti.

Agave species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) species including Batrachedra striolata, which has been recorded on A shawii.

Commonly grown species

The most commonly grown species include Agave americana, Agave angustifolia, Blue agave (Agave tequilana), and Agave attenuata.

The flower of an agave plant.
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Agave americana

One of the most familiar species is Agave americana, a native of tropical America. Common names include century plant, maguey (in Mexico), or American aloe (it is not, however, closely related to the genus Aloe). The name "century plant" refers to the long time the plant takes to flower, although the number of years before flowering occurs depends on the vigor of the individual, the richness of the soil and the climate; during these years the plant is storing in its fleshy leaves the nourishment required for the effort of flowering.

Agave americana, century plant, was introduced into Europe about the middle of the 16th century, and is now widely cultivated for its handsome appearance; in the variegated forms, the leaf has a white or yellow marginal or central stripe from base to apex. As the leaves unfold from the center of the rosette, the impression of the marginal spines is very conspicuous on the still erect younger leaves. The tequ plants are usually grown in tubs and put out in the summer months, but in the winter require protection from frost. They mature very slowly and die after flowering, but are easily propagated by the offsets from the base of the stem.

Agave attenuata

A. attenuata is a native of central Mexico and is uncommon in its natural habitat. Unlike most species of Agave, A. attenuata has a curved flower spike from which it derives one of its numerous common names - the foxtail agave. A. attenuata is also commonly grown as a garden plant. Unlike many agaves, A. attenuata has no teeth or terminal spines, making it an ideal plant for areas adjacent to footpaths. Like all agaves, A. attenuata is a succulent and requires little water or maintenance once established.

Agave tequilana

Agave azul (Blue Agave) is used in the production of tequila.

Uses

the large flower spike of Agave chiapensis

Four major parts of the agave are edible: the flowers, the leaves, the stalks or basal rosettes, and the sap (called aguamiel—honey water). (Davidson 1999)

Each agave plant will produce several pounds of edible flowers during its final season. The stalks, which are ready during the summer, before the blossom, weigh several pounds each. Roasted, they are sweet and can be chewed to extract the aguamiel, like sugarcane. When dried out, the stalks can be used to make didgeridoos. The leaves may be collected in winter and spring, when the plants are rich in sap, for eating. The leaves of several species also yield fiber: for instance, Agave rigida var. sisalana, sisal hemp, Agave decipiens, false sisal hemp. Agave americana is the source of pita fiber, and is used as a fiber plant in Mexico, the West Indies and southern Europe.

During the development of the inflorescence, there is a rush of sap to the base of the young flower stalk. Agave syrup (also called agave nectar) is used as an alternative to sugar in cooking. In the case of A. americana and other species, this is used in Mexico and Mesoamerica in the production of the beverage pulque. The flower shoot is cut out and the sap collected and subsequently fermented. By distillation, a spirit called mezcal is prepared; one of the best-known forms of mezcal is tequila. In 2001, the Mexican Government and European Union agreed upon the classification of tequila and its categories. All 100% blue agave tequila must be made from the Weber blue agave plant, to rigorous specifications and only in certain Mexican states.

People have found a few other uses of the plant aside from its several uses as food. When dried and cut in slices, the flowering stem forms natural razor strops, and the expressed juice of the leaves will lather in water like soap. The natives of Mexico used the agave to make pens, nails and needles, as well as string to sew and make weavings. Leaf tea or tincture taken orally is used to treat constipation and excess gas. It is also used as a diuretic. Root tea or tincture is taken orally to treat arthritic joints.[citation needed]

Warnings

The juice from many species of agave can cause acute contact dermatitis. It will produce reddening and blistering lasting one to two weeks. Episodes of itching may recur up to a year thereafter, even though there is no longer a visible rash. Irritation is, in part, caused by calcium oxalate raphides. Dried parts of the plants can be handled with bare hands with little or no effect. If the skin is pierced deeply enough, by the needle-like ends of the leaf from a vigorously growing plant, this can also cause blood vessels in the surrounding area to erupt and an area some 6-7 cm across appear to be bruised. This may last up to two to three weeks.

Taxonomy

Agave is a genus within the family Agavaceae, which is currently placed within the order Asparagales. Agaves were once classified in Liliaceae, but most references now include them in their own family, Agavaceae. The genus Agave is divided into two subgenera: Agave and Littaea.

Agaves have long presented special difficulties for taxonomy; variations within a species may be considerable, and a number of named species are of unknown origin and may just be variants of original wild species.

Spanish and Portuguese explorers probably brought agave plants back to Europe with them, but the plants became popular in Europe during the 19th century, when many types were imported by collectors. Some have been continuously propagated by offset since then, and do not consistently resemble any species known in the wild, although this may simply be due to the differences in growing conditions in Europe.

Images of species and cultivars

Species

See List of Agave species.

See also

Agave nectar

References

Notes

  1. ^ An Anglo-Hispanic pronunciation. Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607.
  2. ^ An Anglo-Latin pronunciation. OED: "Agave".

Bibliography


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

AGAVE, a large botanical genus of the natural order Amaryllidaceae, chiefly Mexican, but occurring also in the southern and western United States and in central and tropical South America. The plants have a large rosette of thick fleshy leaves generally ending in a sharp point and with a spiny margin; the stout stem is usually short, the leaves apparently springing from the root. They grow slowly and flower but once after a number of years, when a tall stem or "mast" grows from the centre of the leaf rosette and bears a large number of shortly tubular flowers. After development of fruit the plant dies down, but suckers are frequently produced from the base of the stem which become new plants. The most familiar species is Agave americana (see fig.), a native of tropical America, the so-called century plant or American aloe (the maguey of Mexico). The number of years before flowering occurs depends on the vigour of the individual, the richness of the soil and the climate; during these years the plant is storing in its fleshy leaves the nourishment required for the effort of flowering. During the development of the inflorescence there is a rush of sap to the base of the young flowerstalk. In the case of A. americana and other species this is used by the Mexicans to make their national beverage, pulque; the flower shoot is cut out and the sap collected and subsequently fermented. By distillation a spirit called mescal is prepared. The leaves of several species yield fibre, as for instance, A. rigida var. sisalana, sisal hemp, A. decipiens, false sisal hemp; A. americana is the source of Pita fibre, and is used as a fibre plant in Mexico, the West Indies and southern Europe. The flowering stem of the last named, dried and cut in slices, forms.

Agave americana, Century plant or American aloe. About 1/40 nat. size. 1, Flower; 2, same flower split open above the ovary; 3, ovary cut across; 1, 2, and 3, about 1/2 nat. size.

From the Botanical Magazine, by permission of Lovell Reeve and Co.

natural razor strops, and the expressed juice of the leaves will lather in water like soap. In the Madras Presidency the plant is extensively used for hedges along railroads. Agave americana, century plant, was introduced into Europe about the middle of the 16th century and is now widely cultivated for its handsome appearance; in the variegated forms the leaf has a white or yellow marginal or central stripe from base to apex. As the leaves unfold from the centre of the rosette the impression of the marginal spines is very conspicuous on the still erect younger leaves. The plants are usually grown in tubs and put out in the summer months, but in the winter require to be protected from frost. They mature very slowly and die after flowering, but are easily propagated by the offsets from the base of the stem.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Agave americana
See also agave

Contents

Translingual

Etymology

Proper noun

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Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Agave

  1. a taxonomic genus, within family Agavaceae - the agaves
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Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies

See also

  • See Wikispecies for the many species

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Classification System: APG II (down to family level)

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiospermae
Cladus: Monocots
Ordo: Asparagales
Familia: Agavaceae
Genus: Agave
Species:

Directory A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

A. aboriginum - A. abortiva - A. abrupta - A. acicularis - A. acklinicola - A. acuispina - A. affinis - A. aktites - A. albescens - A. albicans - A. albomarginata - A. alibertii - A. aloides - A. aloina - A. altissima - A. amaniensis - A. americana - A. amoena - A. amurensis - A. ananassoides - A. angustiarum - A. angustifolia - A. angustissima - A. anomala - A. antillarum - A. apedicellata - A. applanata - A. arizonica - A. arubensis - A. aspera - A. asperrima - A. atrovirens - A. attenuata - A. aurea - A. auricantha - A. australis - A. avellanidens

B

A. bahamana - A. bakeri - A. banlan - A. barbadensis - A. baxteri - A. beaucarnei - A. beauleriana - A. bergeri - A. bernhardi - A. besseriana - A. bicolor - A. boldinghiana - A. bollii - A. bonnetiana - A. botterii - A. bouchei - A. bourgaei - A. bovicornuta - A. braceana - A. brachystachys - A. bracteosa - A. brandegeei - A. brauniana - A. breedlovei - A. brevipetala - A. breviscapa - A. brevispina - A. brittoniana - A. bromeliaefolia - A. brunnea - A. bulbifera - A. bulliana

C

A. cacozela - A. caeciliana - A. caerulescens - A. caespitosa - A. cajalbanensis - A. calderoni - A. californica - A. calodonta - A. campanulata - A. canartiana - A. candelabrum - A. cantala - A. cantula - A. capensis - A. carchariodonta - A. caribaea - A. caribaeicola - A. caribiicola - A. carminis - A. caroli-schmidtii - A. celsiana - A. celsii - A. cernua - A. cerulata - A. chamelensis - A. chiapensis - A. chihuahuana - A. chinensis - A. chisosensis - A. chloracantha - A. chrysantha - A. chrysoglossa - A. cinerascens - A. coarctata - A. coccinea - A. cochlearis - A. cocui - A. coerulescens - A. coespitosa - A. cohniana - A. colimana - A. collina - A. colorata - A. commelini - A. communis - A. compacta - A. complicata - A. compluviata - A. concinna - A. conduplicata - A. confertiflora - A. congesta - A. conjuncta - A. connochaetodon - A. consideranti - A. consociata - A. convallis - A. corderoyi - A. costaricana - A. couesii - A. crassispina - A. crenata - A. cubensis - A. cucullata - A. cundinamarcensis - A. cupreata - A. cuspidata - A. cyanophylla

D

A. dasyliriodes - A. dasylirioides - A. datylio - A. davilloni - A. de-meesteriana - A. dealbata - A. deamiana - A. debayyana - A. debilis - A. decaisneana - A. decipiens - A. deflexispina - A. delamateri - A. demeesteriana - A. densiflora - A. dentata - A. dentiens - A. deserti - A. desmetiana - A. desmettiana - A. deweyana - A. diacantha - A. difformis - A. disceptata - A. disjuncta - A. dissimulans - A. dolichantha - A. donnell-smithii - A. drimiaefolia - A. duplicata - A. duragensis - A. dussiana - A. dyckii

E

A. eborispina - A. echinoides - A. eduardi - A. eggersiana - A. ehrenbergiana - A. ehrenbergii - A. eichlami - A. ekmani - A. elizae - A. ellemeetiana - A. elongata - A. endlichiana - A. engelmanni - A. engelmannii - A. ensifera - A. ensiformis - A. entea - A. erosa - A. evadens - A. excelsa - A. expansa - A. expatriata

F

A. falcata - A. felgeri - A. felina - A. fenzliana - A. ferdinandi-regis - A. ferox - A. filamentosa - A. filifera - A. filipes - A. flaccida - A. flaccifolia - A. flavescens - A. flavovirens - A. flexispina - A. foetida - A. fortiflora - A. fourcroydes - A. fragrantissima - A. franceschiana - A. franzosini - A. franzosinii - A. friderici - A. fuerstenbergii - A. funifera - A. funkiana - A. fusca

G

A. galeottei - A. garciae-mendozae - A. geminiflora - A. gentryi - A. ghiesbrechtii - A. ghiesbreghtii - A. gigantea - A. gigantensis - A. gilberti - A. gilbeyi - A. glabra - A. glaucescens - A. glomeruliflora - A. goeppertiana - A. goldmaniana - A. gonzaloi - A. gracilipes - A. gracilis - A. grandibracteata - A. grandidentata - A. granulosa - A. grenadina - A. grijalvensis - A. grisea - A. guadalajarana - A. guatemalensis - A. guedeneyri - A. guerrerensis - A. guiengola - A. gustaviana - A. gutierreziana - A. guttata - A. gypsophila

H

A. hanburii - A. harrisii - A. hartmani - A. hartmanii - A. haseloffii - A. hauniensis - A. havardiana - A. haworthiana - A. haynaldi - A. haynaldii - A. henriquesii - A. heteracantha - A. hexapetala - A. hiemiflora - A. hookeri - A. horizontalis - A. horrida - A. houghii - A. houlletii - A. howardii - A. huachucaensis - A. huachucensis - A. huehueteca - A. humboldtiana - A. humilis - A. hurteri - A. hybrida - A. hystrix

I

A. impressa - A. inaequidens - A. inaguensis - A. indagatorum - A. ingens - A. inghami - A. inopinabilis - A. integrifolia - A. intermixta - A. intrepida - A. involuta - A. isthmensis - A. ixtli - A. ixtlioides -

J

A. jacobiana - A. jacquiniana - A. jaiboli - A. jaliscana - A. jarucoensis

K

A. kaibabensis - A. karatto - A. karwinskii - A. katharinae - A. kellermaniana - A. kellocki - A. keratto - A. kerchovei - A. kewensis - A. kirchneriana - A. knightiana - A. kochii

L

A. lagunae - A. lamprochlora - A. langlassei - A. lata - A. laticincta - A. latifolia - A. latissima - A. laurentiana - A. laxa - A. laxifolia - A. lecheguilla - A. lechuguilla - A. legrelliana - A. leguayana - A. lehmannii - A. lemairei - A. lempana - A. lepida - A. lespinassei - A. letonae - A. lindleyi - A. linearis - A. littaeaoides - A. littoralis - A. longibracteata - A. longiflora - A. longipes - A. longisepala - A. lophantha - A. lurida - A. lxtli

M

A. macracantha - A. macrantha - A. macroacantha - A. macroculmis - A. maculata - A. maculosa - A. madagascariensis - A. magni - A. maigretiana - A. malinezii - A. manguai - A. mapisaga - A. margaritae - A. marmorata - A. martiana - A. maximiliana - A. maximowicziana - A. mayoensis - A. mckelveyana - A. medioxima - A. megalacantha - A. melanacantha - A. melliflua - A. mescal - A. mexicana - A. michoacana - A. micracantha - A. micrantha - A. milleri - A. millspaughii - A. minarum - A. mirabilis - A. miradorensis - A. missionum - A. mitis - A. mitraeformis - A. monostachya - A. montana - A. montserratensis - A. moranii - A. morrisii - A. muilmanni - A. mulfordiana - A. multifilifera - A. multiflora - A. multilineata - A. murpheyi - A. mutiflora

N

A. nanchititlensis - A. nashii - A. nayaritensis - A. neglecta - A. nelsonii - A. neomexicana - A. neonelsonii - A. neopringlei - A. nevadensis - A. nevidis - A. newberyi - A. nickelsi - A. nigrescens - A. nissoni - A. nivea - A. nizandensis - A. noacki - A. noli-tangere

O

A. obducta - A. oblongata - A. obscura - A. ocahui - A. odorata - A. offoyana - A. oligophylla - A. oliverana - A. opacidens - A. orcuttiana - A. ornata - A. ornithobroma - A. oroensis - A. ortgiesiana - A. ottonis - A. ousselghemiana - A. ovatifolia - A. oweni

P

A. pachyacantha - A. pachycentra - A. pacifica - A. pallida - A. palmaris - A. palmeri - A. palustris - A. pampaniniana - A. panamana - A. papyriocarpa - A. papyrocarpa - A. parrasana - A. parryi - A. parvidentata - A. parviflora - A. patonii - A. paucifolia - A. paupera - A. pavoliniana - A. peacockii - A. pedrosana - A. pedunculifera - A. pelona - A. pendula - A. perbella - A. perlucida - A. perplexans - A. pes-mulae - A. petiolata - A. petrophila - A. phillipsiana - A. picta - A. planera - A. planifolia - A. platyphylla - A. polianthes - A. polianthiflora - A. polianthoides - A. polyacantha - A. polyanthoides - A. polyphylla - A. portoricensis - A. poselgeri - A. potatorum - A. potosina - A. potrerana - A. prainiana - A. pratensis - A. pringlei - A. producta - A. prolifera - A. promontorii - A. prostrata - A. protuberans - A. pruinosa - A. pseudotequilana - A. pubescens - A. pugioniformis - A. pulcherrima - A. pulchra - A. pulverulenta - A. pumila - A. punctata - A. purpurea - A. purpusorum - A. pygmae

Q

A. quadrata - A. quiotifera

R

A. ragusae - A. ramosa - A. rasconensis - A. recurva - A. regeliana - A. regia - A. reginae - A. revoluta - A. rhodacantha - A. richardsii - A. rigida - A. rigidissima - A. roezliana - A. rohanii - A. roseana - A. rosei - A. rubescens - A. rubrocincta - A. rudis - A. rufocincta - A. rumphii - A. rupicola - A. rutteniae - A. rzedowskiana

S

A. salmdyckii - A. salmiana - A. samalana - A. saponaria - A. saponifera - A. sartorii - A. saundersii - A. scaberrima - A. scabra - A. scaphoidea - A. scaposa - A. scheuermaniana - A. schidigera - A. schildigera - A. schlechtendahlii - A. schneideriana - A. schnittspahnii - A. schottii - A. scolymus - A. sebastiana - A. seemanniana - A. segurae - A. serrulata - A. sessiliflora - A. shaferi - A. shawii - A. shrevei - A. sicaefolia - A. sileri - A. simoni - A. singuliflora - A. sisalana - A. sisaliana - A. sisalina - A. sleviniana - A. smithiana - A. sobolifera - A. sobria - A. sonorae - A. sordida - A. spectabilis - A. spicata - A. spinosa - A. splendens - A. stenophylla - A. stictata - A. striata - A. stricta - A. stringens - A. subfalcata - A. subinermis - A. subsimplex - A. subtilis - A. subzonata - A. sudburyensis - A. sullivani

T

A. tecta - A. tenuifolia - A. tenuispina - A. teopiscana - A. teoxomuliana - A. tequilana - A. terraccianoi - A. theometel - A. thomasae - A. thomsoniana - A. thuacanensis - A. tigrina - A. titanota - A. todaroi - A. toneliana - A. tortispina - A. toumeyana - A. trankeera - A. treleasei - A. treleasii - A. triangularis - A. troubetskoyana - A. tuberosa - A. tubulata

U

A. uncinata - A. underwoodii - A. undulata - A. unguiculata - A. univittata - A. utahensis

V

A. valenciana - A. van-grolae - A. vanderdonckii - A. vandervinneni - A. variegata - A. ventum-versa - A. vera-crucis - A. vera-cruz - A. vernae - A. verschaffeltii - A. vestita - A. vexans - A. vicina - A. victoriae-reginae - A. vilmoriniana - A. virginiana - A. virginica - A. viridissima - A. vivipara - A. vizcainoensis

W

A. wallisii - A. warelliana - A. washingtonensis - A. watsonii - A. weberi - A. weingartii - A. weissenburgensis - A. wendtii - A. wercklei - A. whitackeri - A. wiesenbergensis - A. wightii - A. wildingii - A. willdingii - A. winteriana - A. wislizeni - A. wocomahi - A. woodrowi - A. wrightii

X

A. xalapensis - A. xylacantha - A. xylonacantha

Y

A. yaquiana - A. yuccaefolia - A. yuccifolia - A. yxtli

Z

A. zapupe - A. zebra - A. zonata - A. zuccarinii

Name

Agave L., Sp. Pl.: 323. 1753.

Synonyms

  • Bonapartea Haw., Syn. Pl. Succ.: 68. 1812.
  • Ghiesbreghtia Roezl, Gartenflora 10: 122. 1861, nom. nud.
  • Littaea Tagl., Bibliot. Ital. (Milan) 1: 106. 1816.

References

  • Linnaeus, Carl, 1718: Hort. Ups. 87.
  • The International Plant Names Index Agave.
  • GBIF .

Vernacular names

Dansk: Agave
Deutsch: Agaven
English: Agave
Español: Agave
Français: Agave
Italiano: Agave
Latina: Agave
Nederlands: Agave
日本語: リュウゼツラン属
Polski: Agawa
Русский: Агава
Suomi: Agaavet
ייִדיש: אַגאַווע
中文: 龍舌蘭草
Wikimedia Commons For more multimedia, look at Agave on Wikimedia Commons.

Simple English

Agave
File:Agave americana
Agave americana (Century Plant)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Liliopsida
Order: Asparagales
Family: Agavaceae
Genus: Agave
L.
File:Agave
Agave americana
File:Agave americana
Agave americana, flowering. The flower is 2 metres high
File:Agave
The agave that is used to make tequila

Agaves are succulent plants. Succulent plants store water in their leaves. Cacti (more than one cactus) are one kind of succulents; agaves are another kind. There are quite a few such kinds of succulent plants.

Agaves grow mainly in Mexico. The agave plants have their leaves in a rosetta arrangement. They flower only once, produce seeds and die off.

Tequila is made from agaves. Pulque is beer made from agave juice


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