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Ajmalicine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(19α)-16,17-didehydro-19-methyloxayohimban-16-carboxylic acid methyl ester
Identifiers
CAS number 483-04-5
ATC code none
PubChem 251561
ChemSpider 220386
Chemical data
Formula C21H24N2O3 
Mol. mass 352.43 g/mol
SMILES eMolecules & PubChem
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.  ?
Legal status Prescription only
Routes Oral

Ajmalicine, also known as δ-yohimbine or raubasine, is an antihypertensive drug used in the treatment of high blood pressure.[1] It has been marketed under numerous brand names including Card-Lamuran, Circolene, Cristanyl, Duxil, Duxor, Hydroxysarpon, Iskedyl, Isosarpan, Isquebral, Lamuran, Melanex, Saltucin Co, Salvalion, and Sarpan.[1] It is also an alkaloid found naturally in various plants such as Rauwolfia spp., Catharanthus roseus, and Mitragyna speciosa.[1][2][3]

Ajmalicine is structurally related to yohimbine, rauwolscine, and other yohimban derivatives. Like corynanthine, it acts as a α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist with preferential actions over α2-adrenergic receptors, underlying its hypotensive rather than hypertensive effects.[1][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Wink, Michael; Roberts, M. W. (1998). Alkaloids: biochemistry, ecology, and medicinal applications. New York: Plenum Press. ISBN 0-306-45465-3. http://books.google.com/books?id=bMCzyrAtrvYC&lpg=PA450&dq=ajmalicine&as_brr=3&pg=PA451#v=onepage&q=&f=false. 
  2. ^ Kurz WG, Chatson KB, Constabel F, et al. (May 1981). "Alkaloid Production in Catharanthus roseus Cell Cultures VIII1". Planta Medica 42 (5): 22–31. doi:10.1055/s-2007-971541. PMID 17401876. http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-971541. 
  3. ^ León F, Habib E, Adkins JE, Furr EB, McCurdy CR, Cutler SJ (July 2009). "Phytochemical characterization of the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa grown in U.S.A". Natural Product Communications 4 (7): 907–10. PMID 19731590. 
  4. ^ Roquebert J, Demichel P (October 1984). "Inhibition of the alpha 1 and alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated pressor response in pithed rats by raubasine, tetrahydroalstonine and akuammigine". European Journal of Pharmacology 106 (1): 203–5. PMID 6099269. 
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