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Aju or Achu (1227-1287) was a general and chancellor of the Mongol Empire and the Yuan Dynasty. He is from Jarchud clan of the Mongol Uriankhai.

His grandfather was Subotai, the honored general and noyan of Chingis, and father was Uryankhadai.

In 1253 he followed his father and subdued western Chinese people and defeated the Kingdom of Dali. Uryankhadai and Aju led 3,000 Mongols and more than 10,000 troops from Dali tribes to northern Vietnam in 1255. After three failed invasions by the Mongols, the kings of the Tran Dynasty only became vassal to avoid further conflict and bloodshed; this lasted until the reign of Kublai[1].

He and his father supported the Great Khan Mongke and Kublai's forces in 1258. Aju commanded a myriarch, 10,000 men in his earlier career. They conquered 13 cities within 2 years and destroyed 40,000 troops of the Song Dynasty while his father was ill. After the occupation of Chingzhoua and Yovajiyu, Uryankhadai met prince Kublai at Echjou.

When Kublai enthroned in 1260, Aju stayed his palace and became a cherbi of kheshigs. Following year, he was ordered to lead the Yuan troops in Lianshui (涟水). He crushed Song armies and navys from 1261-1275. He captured Fancheng (樊城) by using Khotan (Muslim) artillery during the Battle of Xiangyang in 1273 and its governor suicided. He was selected as the east hand chengxiang (丞相, "chancellor") of Central Governing Department (中書省) in 1275.

In 1276, Aju was appointed to defend Beshbalik from Kaidu, a grandson of Ogedei. He died after the defeat of prince Sarban, who revolted against his master Kublai, in 1287. But some source mentions he died in route in 1286.

References

  1. ^ Rene Grousset - Empire of Steppes, Encyclopedia of Mongolia and Mongol Empire: see - Aju

Christopher.P.E.Atwood - Encyclopedia of Mongolia and the Mongol Empire

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