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Alan Grayson


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida's 8th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 2009
Preceded by Ric Keller

Born March 13, 1958 (1958-03-13) (age 52)
The Bronx, New York City, New York
Political party Democratic Party
Spouse(s) Lolita Grayson
Residence Orlando, Florida
Alma mater Harvard College (A.B.)

John F. Kennedy School of Government (M.P.P.)
Harvard Law School (J.D.)

Profession Attorney
Religion Jewish[1][2]
Website www.Grayson.House.gov

Alan Mark Grayson (born March 13, 1958) is an American attorney who is currently serving as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Florida's 8th congressional district. The district includes just over half of Orlando, as well as Celebration, Walt Disney World and part of Ocala. A progressive Democrat, Grayson defeated Ric Keller, a four-term incumbent Republican in the 2008 congressional election.

Contents

Early life and education

Grayson was born in the Bronx, New York and grew up in the tenements. He graduated from Bronx High School of Science and worked his way through Harvard University graduating summa cum laude in three years. He was also a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He worked as an economist for two years and returned to Harvard for graduate studies. Within four years, he earned a law degree with honors from Harvard Law School, a masters in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government and completed the course work and passed the general exams for a Ph.D. in government.[3][4]

Career

Grayson was employed as a law clerk at the Colorado Supreme Court in 1983,[5] and at the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals from 1984 to 1985, where he worked with such judges as Abner Mikva, Robert Bork, and two judges who later joined the U.S. Supreme Court: Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia.[citation needed] He was an associate at the Washington D.C. firm of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson for five years, where he specialized in contract law.

Grayson wrote his masters thesis on gerontology and in 1986 he helped to found the Alliance for Aging Research (AAR), and served as an officer of the organization for more than twenty years.[6] AAR is a non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C. that was founded to promote medical research to improve the human experience of aging.

In 1991 he founded the law firm Grayson, Kubli which concentrated on government contract law. He was a lecturer at the George Washington University government contracts program and a frequent speaker on the topic.[4] Grayson also was the first president of IDT Corporation, a publicly traded billion-dollar telecommunications company.[6][7] Grayson was ranked as the 12th-wealthiest member of Congress based on financial disclosure forms with a minimum net worth of $31.12 million, according to Roll Call.[8]

In the 2000s he worked as a plaintiffs' attorney specializing in whistleblower fraud cases aimed at Iraq war contractors. One contractor, Custer Battles, employed individuals who were found guilty of making fraudulent statements and submitting fraudulent invoices on two contracts in 2003 the company had with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq.[9][10] On behalf of his clients, Grayson filed suit under the False Claims Act and its qui tam provisions.[9] Grayson disclosed his attorney fees and costs for the case exceeded $4 million.[10][11]

While pursuing the whistleblower cases, Grayson worked from a home office in Orlando where he lived with his wife and five children. In 2006, a Wall Street Journal reporter described Grayson as "waging a one-man war against contractor fraud in Iraq" and as a "fierce critic of the war in Iraq" whose car was "emblazoned" with bumper stickers such as "Bush lied, people died".[11]

Electoral history

In 2006 Grayson his first entered into electoral politics losing the 2006 Democratic primary for Florida's 8th Congressional District to Charlie Stuart, a prominent local businessman and center-right Democrat.[12] Stuart went on to lose the general election to incumbent Republican Congressman Ric Keller.[13] In late 2007, Grayson announced that he would run again for the 8th District seat, and again faced Stuart in the primary. During the primary, his campaign retained the services of Bill Hillsman.

In the August 26, 2008 Democratic primary, Grayson prevailed, receiving 48.5% of the vote. Stuart trailed with 27.5%, with three other candidates splitting the remaining 24%.[14] During the general election campaign, Grayson maintained a consistent lead over Keller, who had barely eked out renomination in the Republican primary over attorney Todd Long. On Election Day, Grayson received 172,854 votes, or 52%, to Keller's 159,490 votes, or 48%.[15] Although Keller won three out of four counties in the district, Grayson won by a margin of 55% to 45% in Orange County, home to Orlando and by far the largest county in the district.[16] Grayson was also helped by a massive voter registration drive that gave Democrats a slight edge in registered voters.

Grayson is only the second Democrat to represent this district since its formation after the 1970 census (it was the 5th District from 1973 to 1993 and has been the 8th District since 1993). The only other Democrat to represent this district, Bill Gunter, gave it up after only one term to run for the United States Senate in 1974.

Congressional career

Despite representing a historically Republican district, Grayson bills himself as a progressive Democrat. He is a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, of which he is vice-chairman.[17].

Federal Reserve transparency

During his first term in office, Grayson supported Ron Paul's Audit the Fed legislation.[18] Grayson gained attention for exchanges with Federal Reserve System Vice Chairman Donald Kohn and Inspector General Elizabeth A. Coleman.[19]

In March 2009, following the AIG bonus payments controversy, Grayson joined with fellow freshman Democrat Jim Himes of Connecticut to introduce the Grayson-Himes Pay for Performance Act, legislation to require that all bonuses paid by companies that had received funds under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 be "based on performance".[20] The bill was co-sponsored by eight other members of the House. On March 26, the bill was approved by the House Financial Services Committee by a vote of 38-22 and on April 1, the bill was passed by the full House of Representatives by a vote of 247-171.[21]

Grayson is a co-sponsor of the Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009, which would provide addition provisions to audit the Federal Reserve, including removing several key exemptions.[22]

On a September 2009 Alex Jones Show segment Grayson used the term whore when characterizing Federal Reserve Chair Bernanke's senior adviser Linda Robertson, stating in part, "I am the only member of Congress who actually worked as an economist, and this lobbyist, this K-Street whore, is trying to teach me about economics!"[23][24][25] Grayson's use of whore was widely criticized as inappropriate including by House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer.[26][27] Grayson's congressional spokesman, Todd Jurkowski, clarified that the comment "was on her professional career, not her personal life" and Grayson subsequently apologized.[28]

2009 health care comments

In September 2009, during the debates leading to the passage of the Affordable Health Care for America Act by the House in November, Grayson quipped during a speech that, "The Republican health care plan is this: 'Don't get sick, and if you do get sick, die quickly.'"[29] His remarks were widely condemned by Republican politicians but, according to Grayson, were well-received by his constituents. Grayson reported that his comments resulted in over five thousand campaign contributions and that the positive emails he received outnumbered the negative ones by a four-to-one margin;[30][31][32][33] the comments also generated funds from the Democratic National Committee towards his upcoming 2010 campaign race.[33][34] Grayson raised $347,000 for his reelection campaign during the third quarter, much of it attributed to his remarks.[35][36]

He defended his comment and in a House Floor speech stated, “I apologize to the dead and their families that we haven't voted sooner to end this holocaust in America." Grayson, who is Jewish by birth, apologized to the Anti-defamation League for those offended by his generic use of "holocaust".[37][38] He also maintained that Congressional Republicans have failed to offer a feasible plan.[39][40] In October 2009 he launched www.NamesOfTheDead.com, a website to "memorialize Americans who die because they don’t have health insurance." He subsequently read stories of the dead submitted through the Names of the Dead site on the House floor.[41]

He supported the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Grayson also voted for the FDA Oversight of Tobacco Products, which gives the FDA power to regulate tobacco products. He voted in support of Eliminating Adjustments of Medicare Rates of Payment. He also voted against Republican substitutes for the health care amendment and insurance law amendments.[42]

Civil rights positions

Grayson voted in support of the Hate Crimes Expansion Act, which expands the definition of hate crimes and strengthens enforcement of hate crime laws. He also voted for the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. Grayson supported the Paycheck Fairness Act, a bill that allows victims of wage discrimination to sue for punitive damages.[43]

Record on defense

Grayson voted for the 2009-2010 Defense Appropriations, which authorizes $681.02 billion of appropriations for the Department of Defense.[44] He also supported the 2009-2010 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Authorizations, which provided $46.18 billion in appropriations for 2009-2010.[45]

Committee assignments

See also

References

  1. ^ "Grayson regrets use of term ‘holocaust’". The Jewish Chronicle. 2009-10-06. http://jta.org/news/article/2009/10/06/1008327/grayson-regrets-use-of-holocaust. Retrieved 2009-11-30. 
  2. ^ "Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL 8th District)". Congress.org. http://congress.org/congressorg/bio/id/60210. Retrieved 2009-11-30. 
  3. ^ About Alan Grayson, graysonforcongress.com, accessed 2009-09-30
  4. ^ a b An Oversight Hearing on Waste, Fraud and Abuse in U.S. Government Contracting in Iraq - Witness Biographies, U.S. Senate Democratic Policy Committee, 2005-02-14, accessed 2009-09-30.
  5. ^ "Shellie Ruston to Marry Alan Grayson on April 29", The New York Times, March 4, 1984, retrieved 2010-03-11
  6. ^ a b Congressman Alan Grayson Biography, graysonhouse.gov, accessed 2009-10-04.
  7. ^ SEC Info - Idt Corp - 10-Q/A - For 4/30/03 - EX-10.69, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 2000-10-10, accessed 2009-09-30
  8. ^ Who is Alan Grayson Anyway, Wall Street Journal blogs, 2009-10-01
  9. ^ a b Contractor Faces False Claims Act Liability for Payments Made by Iraq’s Coalition Provisional Authority, Construction WebLinks, Howrey LLP, April 20, 2009>
  10. ^ a b Lone War Profiteer Case Wins on Appeal: U.S. Appeals Court Reverses Lower Court Decision, grayson.house.gov, April 10, 2009>
  11. ^ a b Dreazen, Yochi Attorney Pursues Iraq Contractor Fraud, Wall Street Journal., 2006-04-19, accessed 2009-10-03.
  12. ^ Florida Election Results, 2006 Democratic Primary, Florida Dept of State, 2006-09-05
  13. ^ Florida Election Results 2006 General Election, Florida Dept of State, 2006-11-07
  14. ^ D Primary Race Detail, ourcampaigns.com
  15. ^ 2008 General Election Results, Florida Dept of State, 2008-11-04
  16. ^ Fl District 8 General Election Race Detail, ourcampaigns.com
  17. ^ Member List, Website of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, 2009-02-20, accessed 2009-10-03
  18. ^ [1]
  19. ^ Greenwald, Glenn Salon Radio: Rep. Alan Grayson on bailout transparency, (transcript and audio), Salon.com, 2009-01-26
  20. ^ A Better Way For Wall Street, grayson.house.gov, 2009-03-24
  21. ^ Grayson gets his bill through the House, Orlando Sentinel, 2009-04-01
  22. ^ "Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009". 2009-10-22. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-1207. 
  23. ^ Alan Grayson, the Liberals’ Problem Child David M. Herszenhorn, New York Times, October 31, 2009.
  24. ^ [2]
  25. ^ [3]
  26. ^ [4]
  27. ^ "The O'Reilly Factor, Interview with Joe Sestak, October 27, 2009". Fox News Channel. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZ9j3iSgcL8&feature=related. Retrieved November 4th, 2009. 
  28. ^ A Statement from Congressman Alan Grayson, grayson.house.gov, 2009-10-27
  29. ^ "Alan Grayson on the GOP Health Care Plan: 'Don't Get Sick! And if You Do Get Sick, Die Quickly!'", YouTube.com, 2009-09-29
  30. ^ Jonathan Allen Grayson: GOP wants 'you to die', Politico.com, 2009-09-29, accessed 2009-09-30
  31. ^ Is Alan Grayson the Democrats' Joe Wilson?, Yahoo newsroom blog, 2009-10-01
  32. ^ Jonathan Alter Grayson likens health crisis, holocaust, Politico.com, 2009-09-30, accessed 2009-10-01
  33. ^ a b Rep Alan Grayson on Hardball: We can't run this country based on Republican hissy fits,YouTube.com, 2009-10-02.
  34. ^ Alan Grayson (October 20, 2009). "Rep. Alan Grayson on Rachel Maddow: No One Cares About Bipartisanship". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWbTzbadG0I. 
  35. ^ "Cha-ching! Campaign cash tops and flops", Politico.com, 2009-10-16
  36. ^ GOP looks to cash in on Grayson's comments, 2009-10-01, USA Today blogs
  37. ^ Alan Grayson (2009-10-29). "Alan Grayson Enters Rebel Headquarters!". The Young Turks. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnjmoXgK9Og#t=12m42s. 
  38. ^ "Alan Grayson Unlikely to Face GOP Reprimand", CBSNews Blogs, 2009-10-06
  39. ^ Grayson calls Republicans knuckle dragging Neanderthals,CNN.com, 2009-09-30, accessed 2009-10-01
  40. ^ House Republicans Offer Health Care Plan,CBS News, 2009-06-17, accessed 2009-10-02
  41. ^ "Alan Grayson Honors Those Who Died for Lack of Health Insurance, Launches NamesOfTheDead.com". October 21, 2009. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV9TRoYMtjs. 
  42. ^ "Key Vote 2009 Economic Package". votesmart. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=23323&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20th, 2010. 
  43. ^ "Key Vote 2009 Economic Package". votesmart.com. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=23235&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20th, 2010. 
  44. ^ "Key Vote 2009-2010 Defense Appropriations". votesmart.com. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=27807&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20th, 2010. 
  45. ^ "Key Vote 2009-2010 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Authorizations". votesmart.com. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=28013&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20th, 2010. 

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Ric Keller
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida's 8th congressional district

2009 – present
Incumbent

Alan Grayson
File:Alan Grayson high

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida's 8th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 2009
Preceded by Ric Keller

Born March 13, 1958 (1958-03-13) (age 52)
New York City, New York
Political party Democratic Party
Spouse(s) Lolita Grayson
Residence Orlando, Florida
Alma mater Harvard College (A.B.)

Harvard Kennedy School (M.P.P.)
Harvard Law School (J.D.)

Profession Attorney
Religion Jewish[1]
Website www.Grayson.House.gov
Alan Mark Grayson (born March 13, 1958) is an American attorney who is currently serving as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Florida's 8th congressional district. The district includes just over half of Orlando, including Downtown, as well as Celebration, Walt Disney World and part of Ocala. An outspoken liberal Democrat, Grayson defeated Ric Keller, a four-term incumbent Republican in the 2008 congressional election. He is currently running for re-election against Republican Daniel Webster.

Contents

Early life and education

Grayson was born in the Bronx, New York. He graduated from Bronx High School of Science and worked his way through Harvard University as a janitor and nightwatchman,[2] graduating summa cum laude in three years. He was also a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He returned to Harvard for graduate studies. Within four years, he earned a law degree with honors from Harvard Law School, a masters in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and completed the course work and passed the general exams for a Ph.D. in government.[3][4]

Law career

Grayson was employed as a law clerk at the Colorado Supreme Court in 1983,[5] and at the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals from 1984 to 1985, where he worked with such judges as Abner Mikva, Robert Bork, and two judges who later joined the U.S. Supreme Court: Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia.[citation needed] He was an associate at the Washington D.C. firm of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson for five years, where he specialized in contract law.

Grayson wrote his masters thesis on gerontology and in 1986, he helped found the Alliance for Aging Research (AAR), and served as an officer of the organization for more than twenty years.[6] AAR is a non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C. that was founded to promote medical research to improve the human experience of aging.

In 1991 he founded the law firm Grayson, Kubli which concentrated on government contract law. He was a lecturer at the George Washington University government contracts program and a frequent speaker on the topic.[4] Grayson also was the first president of IDT Corporation, a publicly traded billion-dollar telecommunications company.[6][7] Grayson was ranked as the 12th-wealthiest member of Congress based on financial disclosure forms with a minimum net worth of $31.12 million, according to Roll Call.[8]

In the 2000s, he worked as a plaintiffs' attorney specializing in whistleblower fraud cases aimed at Iraq war contractors. One contractor, Custer Battles, employed individuals who were found guilty of making fraudulent statements and submitting fraudulent invoices on two contracts in 2003 the company had with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq.[9][10] On behalf of his clients, Grayson filed suit under the False Claims Act and its qui tam provisions.[9] Grayson disclosed his attorney fees and costs for the case exceeded $4 million.[10][11]

While pursuing the whistleblower cases, Grayson worked from a home office in Orlando where he lived with his wife and five children. In 2006, a Wall Street Journal reporter described Grayson as "waging a one-man war against contractor fraud in Iraq" and as a "fierce critic of the war in Iraq" whose car displayed bumper stickers such as "Bush lied, people died".[11]

U.S. House of Representatives

Despite representing a historically Republican district, Grayson bills himself as a progressive Democrat. He is a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, of which he is vice-chairman.[12]

Committee assignments

Legislation head sponsored by Grayson

Political positions

Federal Reserve transparency

During his first term in office, Grayson supported Ron Paul's Audit the Fed legislation.[13] Grayson gained attention for exchanges with Federal Reserve System Vice Chairman Donald Kohn and Inspector General Elizabeth A. Coleman.[14]

In March 2009, following the AIG bonus payments controversy, Grayson joined with fellow freshman Democrat Jim Himes of Connecticut to introduce the Grayson-Himes Pay for Performance Act, legislation to require that all bonuses paid by companies that had received funds under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 be "based on performance".[15] The bill was co-sponsored by eight other members of the House. On March 26, the bill was approved by the House Financial Services Committee by a vote of 38-22 and on April 1, the bill was passed by the full House of Representatives by a vote of 247-171.[16]

Grayson is a co-sponsor of the Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009, which would provide additional provisions to audit the Federal Reserve, including removing several key exemptions.[17]

On a September 2009 Alex Jones Show segment Grayson used the term whore when characterizing Federal Reserve Chair Bernanke's senior adviser Linda Robertson, stating in part, "I am the only member of Congress who actually worked as an economist, and this lobbyist, this K-Street whore, is trying to teach me about economics!"[18][19][20] Grayson's use of whore was widely criticized as inappropriate; including by House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer.[21]

Economic stimulus and health care

Grayson supported the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Grayson also voted for the FDA Oversight of Tobacco Products, which gives the FDA power to regulate tobacco products. He voted in support of Eliminating Adjustments of Medicare Rates of Payment. He also voted against Republican substitutes for the health care amendment and insurance law amendments.[22]

On March 9, 2010, Grayson introduced the Public Option Act, a bill which would allow all citizens and permanent residents of the United States to buy into the public Medicare program.[23] Grayson later voted for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act[24] and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.[25] His controversial remarks denouncing Republican opponents of the health care bill earned him national fame.

Civil rights

Grayson voted in support of the Hate Crimes Expansion Act, which expands the definition of hate crimes and strengthens enforcement of hate crime laws. He also voted for the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. Grayson supported the Paycheck Fairness Act, a bill that allows victims of wage discrimination to sue for punitive damages.[26]

Environment

Grayson voted for the House's 2009 Cap and Trade Bill, despite his initial resistance to the measure; his vote was won with the addition of a $50 million "Hurricane Study Center." Grayson noted after the passage of the Cap and Trade bill his concern for the environment and need for conservation of energy.

Defense

Grayson voted for the 2009-2010 Defense Appropriations, which authorizes $681 billion of appropriations for the Department of Defense.[27] He also supported the 2009-2010 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Authorizations, which provided $46.18 billion in appropriations for 2009-2010.[28]

Controversies over public remarks

Health care

In September 2009, during the debates leading to the passage of the Affordable Health Care for America Act by the House in November, Grayson quipped during a speech that, "The Republican health care plan is this: 'Don't get sick, and if you do get sick, die quickly.'"[29] His remarks were widely condemned by Republican politicians but, according to Grayson, were well received by his constituents. Grayson reported that his comments resulted in over five thousand campaign contributions and that the positive emails he received outnumbered the negative ones by a four-to-one margin;[30][31][32][33] the comments also generated funds from the Democratic National Committee towards his upcoming 2010 campaign race.[33][34] Grayson raised $347,000 for his reelection campaign during the third quarter, much of it attributed to his remarks.[35][36]

He defended his comment and in a House Floor speech stated, “I apologize to the dead and their families that we haven't voted sooner to end this holocaust in America." Grayson, who is Jewish by birth, apologized to the Anti-defamation League for those offended by his generic use of "holocaust".[37][38] He also maintained that Congressional Republicans have failed to offer a feasible plan.[39][40] In October 2009 he launched www.NamesOfTheDead.com, a website to "memorialize Americans who die because they don’t have health insurance." He subsequently read stories of the dead submitted through the Names of the Dead site on the House floor.[41]

Glenn Beck rally

During an appearance on the progressive talk-radio “Stephanie Miller Show” on Sept. 2, 2010, Grayson referred to people attending Glenn Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally the previous weekend by saying “These are people who were wearing sheets over their heads 25 years ago.” He also said: “You only have three friends in life: God, your mama, and the Democratic Party.” [42]

Political campaigns

Grayson is the second Democrat to represent this district since its formation after the 1970 census (it was the 5th District from 1973 to 1993 and has been the 8th District since 1993). The only other Democrat to represent this district, Bill Gunter, gave it up after only one term to run for the United States Senate in 1974.

2006

In 2006, Grayson first entered into electoral politics, losing the 2006 Democratic primary for Florida's 8th Congressional District to Charlie Stuart, a prominent local businessman and center-right Democrat.[43] Stuart went on to lose the general election to incumbent Republican Congressman Ric Keller.[44] In late 2007, Grayson announced that he would run again for the 8th District seat, and again faced Stuart in the primary. During the primary, his campaign retained the services of Bill Hillsman.

2008

In the August 26, 2008 Democratic primary, Grayson prevailed, receiving 48.5% of the vote. Stuart trailed with 27.5%, with three other candidates splitting the remaining 24%.[45] During the general election campaign, Grayson maintained a consistent lead over Keller, who had barely eked out renomination in the Republican primary over attorney Todd Long. On Election Day, Grayson received 172,854 votes, or 52%, to Keller's 159,490 votes, or 48%.[46] Although Keller won three out of four counties in the district, Grayson won by a margin of 55% to 45% in Orange County, home to Orlando and by far the largest county in the district.[47] Grayson was also helped by a massive voter registration drive by the Democratic Party in the 8th District that gave Democrats a slight edge in registered voters.

2010

Grayson is running for re-election again three opponents: Republican Daniel Webster, Independent George Metcalfe, Florida Whig Party candidate Steve Gerritzen, and Peg Dunmire of the Florida TEA Party, a group not affiliated with the Tea Party movement.[48][49]

In August, Grayson warned that, should government spending drastically decrease, people may have to resort to a sort of cannibalism.[50] In September 2010, Grayson began running a commercial calling Webster a "draft-dodger."[51]

Later that month, Grayson began running a 30-second commercial calling Webster "Taliban Dan" and warning viewers that "Religious fanatics try to take away our freedom, in Afghanistan, in Iran and right here in Central Florida."[52] FactCheck reported that Grayson used edited video to make Webster appear to be saying the opposite of what he really said.[53] The Orlando Sentinel stated Grayson took Webster's comments out of context and twisted the meaning of his words.[54]

References

  1. ^ "Grayson regrets use of term ‘holocaust’". The Jewish Chronicle. 2009-10-06. http://jta.org/news/article/2009/10/06/1008327/grayson-regrets-use-of-holocaust. Retrieved 2009-11-30. 
  2. ^ "About Alan | Alan Grayson for U.S. Congress". Graysonforcongress.com. 2006-04-19. http://www.graysonforcongress.com/page.asp?PageId=2. Retrieved 2010-07-11. 
  3. ^ About Alan Grayson, graysonforcongress.com. Retrieved 2009-09-30.
  4. ^ a b An Oversight Hearing on Waste, Fraud and Abuse in U.S. Government Contracting in Iraq - Witness Biographies, U.S. Senate Democratic Policy Committee, 2005-02-14. Retrieved 2009-09-30.
  5. ^ "Shellie Ruston to Marry Alan Grayson on April 29", The New York Times, March 4, 1984, retrieved 2010-03-11
  6. ^ a b Congressman Alan Grayson Biography, graysonhouse.gov. Retrieved 2009-10-04.
  7. ^ SEC Info - Idt Corp - 10-Q/A - For 4/30/03 - EX-10.69, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 2000-10-10. Retrieved 2009-09-30.
  8. ^ Who is Alan Grayson Anyway, Wall Street Journal blogs, 2009-10-01
  9. ^ a b Contractor Faces False Claims Act Liability for Payments Made by Iraq's Coalition Provisional Authority, Construction WebLinks, Howrey LLP, April 20, 2009>
  10. ^ a b Lone War Profiteer Case Wins on Appeal: U.S. Appeals Court Reverses Lower Court Decision, grayson.house.gov, April 10, 2009>
  11. ^ a b Dreazen, Yochi Attorney Pursues Iraq Contractor Fraud, Wall Street Journal., 2006-04-19. Retrieved 2009-10-03.
  12. ^ Member List, Website of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, 2009-02-20. Retrieved 2009-10-03.
  13. ^ [1][dead link]
  14. ^ Greenwald, Glenn Salon Radio: Rep. Alan Grayson on bailout transparency, (transcript and audio), Salon.com, 2009-01-26
  15. ^ A Better Way For Wall Street, grayson.house.gov, 2009-03-24
  16. ^ Grayson gets his bill through the House, Orlando Sentinel, 2009-04-01
  17. ^ "Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009". 2009-10-22. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-1207. 
  18. ^ Alan Grayson, the Liberals’ Problem Child David M. Herszenhorn, New York Times, October 31, 2009.
  19. ^ Robert Scheer (2009-06-25). "Printable version: In financial crisis, Obama is more of the same". Sfgate.com. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/06/25/EDCO18D2QI.DTL&type=printable. Retrieved 2010-07-11. 
  20. ^ Winant, Gabriel (October 27, 2009). "Rep. Alan Grayson goes a comment too far". War Room (Salon). http://www.salon.com/news/politics/war_room/2009/10/27/grayson/. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  21. ^ Sherman, Jake; Allen, Jonathan (October 26, 2009). "Alan Grayson goes too far for colleagues". Politico. http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1009/28763.html. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  22. ^ "Key Vote 2009 Economic Package". votesmart. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=23323&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20, 2010. 
  23. ^ Klein, Ezra (March 10, 2010). "'The Public Option Act'". The Washington Post. http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezra-klein/2010/03/the_public_option_act.html. Retrieved March 25, 2010. 
  24. ^ FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 167(Patient Protection and Affordable Care)House.gov
  25. ^ FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 194(Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010)House.gov
  26. ^ "Key Vote 2009 Economic Package". votesmart.com. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=23235&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Key Vote 2009-2010 Defense Appropriations". votesmart.com. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=27807&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Key Vote 2009-2010 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Authorizations". votesmart.com. http://www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_detail.php?cs_id=28013&can_id=68184. Retrieved January 20, 2010. 
  29. ^ "Alan Grayson on the GOP Health Care Plan: 'Don't Get Sick! And if You Do Get Sick, Die Quickly!'", YouTube.com, 2009-09-29
  30. ^ Jonathan Allen Grayson: GOP wants 'you to die', Politico.com, 2009-09-29. Retrieved 2009-09-30.
  31. ^ Is Alan Grayson the Democrats' Joe Wilson?, Yahoo newsroom blog, 2009-10-01
  32. ^ Jonathan Alter Grayson likens health crisis, holocaust, Politico.com, 2009-09-30. Retrieved 2009-10-01.
  33. ^ a b Rep Alan Grayson on Hardball: We can't run this country based on Republican hissy fits,YouTube.com, 2009-10-02.
  34. ^ Alan Grayson (October 20, 2009). "Rep. Alan Grayson on Rachel Maddow: No One Cares About Bipartisanship". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWbTzbadG0I. 
  35. ^ "Cha-ching! Campaign cash tops and flops", Politico.com, 2009-10-16
  36. ^ GOP looks to cash in on Grayson's comments, 2009-10-01, USA Today blogs
  37. ^ Alan Grayson (2009-10-29). "Alan Grayson Enters Rebel Headquarters!". The Young Turks. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnjmoXgK9Og#t=12m42s. 
  38. ^ "Alan Grayson Unlikely to Face GOP Reprimand", CBSNews Blogs, 2009-10-06
  39. ^ Grayson calls Republicans knuckle dragging Neanderthals,CNN.com, 2009-09-30. Retrieved 2009-10-01.
  40. ^ House Republicans Offer Health Care Plan,CBS News, 2009-06-17. Retrieved 2009-10-02.
  41. ^ "Alan Grayson Honors Those Who Died for Lack of Health Insurance, Launches NamesOfTheDead.com". October 21, 2009. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV9TRoYMtjs. 
  42. ^ http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/news_politics/2010/09/alan-grayson-glenn-beck-fans-wore-sheets-over-their-heads.html
  43. ^ Florida Election Results, 2006 Democratic Primary, Florida Dept of State, 2006-09-05
  44. ^ Florida Election Results 2006 General Election, Florida Dept of State, 2006-11-07
  45. ^ D Primary Race Detail, ourcampaigns.com
  46. ^ 2008 General Election Results, Florida Dept of State, 2008-11-04
  47. ^ Florida District 8 General Election Race Detail, ourcampaigns.com
  48. ^ "Candidate Listing for 2010 General Election". Division of Elections. Tallahassee, Florida: Florida Department of State. 2010. http://election.dos.state.fl.us/candidate/canlist.asp. Retrieved 31 August 2010. 
  49. ^ Ferris, Kevin (29 August 2010). "Back Channels: Democrats backing 'tea-party' candidates". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia Media Holdings (Philadelphia). http://www.philly.com/inquirer/opinion/20100829_Back_Channels__Democrats_backing__tea-party__candidates.html. Retrieved 31 August 2010. 
  50. ^ Grayson: People Might 'Eat Each Other' if we Don't Spend More Fox. Retrieved 10/4/10.
  51. ^ Mark SchluebAlan Grayson TV ad calls Dan Webster a draft dodger Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 9/26/10.
  52. ^ Mark Schlueb (9/26/10) Grayson TV ad compares Webster to Taliban Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 9/26/10.
  53. ^ http://www.factcheck.org/2010/09/rep-grayson-lowers-the-bar/
  54. ^ http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0910/42818.html

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Ric Keller
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from [[Florida's 8Template:Safesubst:Template:Safesubst:Template:Safesubst: congressional district]]

2009 – present
Incumbent


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Alan Grayson is the current Democratic Representative for the 8th congressional district of Florida.

Contents

Sourced

  • "You may recall that a few weeks ago, President Obama came to this chamber, and he addressed the chamber on health care before a joint session of the House and the Senate. During that session I was privileged to be here, and I saw my colleagues on the far side of the aisle, the Republicans, waving pieces of paper during his speech, and I was wondering what they were. I couldn’t imagine — it almost seemed like they wanted President Obama’s autograph. I just didn’t get it. I heard from one of my colleagues that this is what they called the Republican health care plan. I went over, after the speech was over, I picked up a copy that was lying down on the Republican side, and it turns out that the Republicans’ health care plan was a blank piece of paper. I inquired further, trying to find out exactly what the Republicans’ health care plan is. And it’s my duty and pride tonight to be able to announce exactly what the Republicans plan to do for health care in America."
  • "The Republicans’ health care plan for America: "Don’t get sick." That’s right — don’t get sick. If you have insurance, don’t get sick; if you don’t have insurance, don’t get sick; if you’re sick, don’t get sick — just don’t get sick! That’s what the Republicans have in mind for you, America. That’s the Republicans’ health care plan. But I think that the Republicans understand that that plan isn’t always going to work — it’s not a foolproof plan. So the Republicans have a backup plan, in case you do get sick. If you get sick in America, this is what the Republicans want you to do. If you get sick, America, the Republican health care plan is this: "Die quickly." That’s right. The Republicans want you to die quickly if you get sick."
  • Now, the Democrats have a different plan. The Democrats say that: “If you have health insurance, we’re going to make it better. If you don’t have health insurance, we going to provide it to you. If you can’t afford health insurance, then we’ll help you afford health insurance.” So America gets to decide. Do you want the Democratic plan, or do you want the Republican plan? Remember, the Republican plan: "Don’t get sick. And if you do get sick, die quickly.""
    [Grayson on health care reform].
  • "America understands that there is one party in this country that is favor of health care reform and one party that is against it, and they know why. They understand that if Barack Obama were somehow able to cure hunger in the world the Republicans would blame him for overpopulation. They understand that if Barack Obama could somehow bring about world peace they would blame him for destroying the defense industry. In fact, they understand that if Barack Obama has a BLT sandwich tommorrow for lunch, they will try to ban bacon. But that's not what America wants, America wants solutions to it's problems and that begins with health care, and that's what I'm speaking for tonight."
    [Grayson on health care reform].
  • "“By the way, I have trouble listening to what [Cheney] says sometimes because of the blood that drips from his teeth while he’s talking, but my response is this: he’s just angry because the president doesn’t shoot old men in the face. But by the way, when he was done speaking, did he just then turn into a bat and fly away?”"
    [Grayson on Dick Cheney].

Regarding himself

"They call me nuts, they call me stupid, they call me ugly. They might be right about ugly. ...All that I've done is to say what's on other peoples' mind."[1]

Regarding the Republican Party

  • "What the Republicans have been doing is an insult to America. ...These are foot-dragging, knuckle-dragging neanderthals." [Questioned, 'Why are you name-calling?'] "I didn't call names, what I said is true."–September 30, 2009[2][3]
  • "Republican Party, you're a lie factory, that's all you do."–October 1, 2009[4]
  • "Fox News and their Republican collaborators are the enemy of America, ...the enemy of anybody who wants anything good for this country."–October 21, 2009[5]

Regarding Dick Cheney

  • "I have trouble listening to what he [that is, former Vice President of the United States Dick Cheney] says sometimes because of the blood that drips from his teeth while he's talking"
  • "He's just angry because the president [Obama] doesn't shoot old men in the face."
  • "When he was done speaking, did he just then turn into a bat and fly away?"–October 23, 2009[6]

Regarding Rush Limbaugh

  • "Rush Limbaugh is a has-been hypocrite loser, who craves attention. His right-wing lunacy sounds like Mikhail Gorbachev, extolling the virtues of communism. Limbaugh actually was more lucid when he was a drug addict. If America ever did 1% of what he wanted us to do, then we'd all need pain killers."–January 2009[7]
  • "I’m sorry... I’m sorry that Limbaugh is one sorry excuse for a human being."–March 4, 2009[8]

Regarding others

  • "What Joe Wilson did is like a belch."–October 12, 2009[9]
  • "Neil [Cavuto] [a Fox News Senior Vice President (and anchor)], I'm not the one using profanity on the air. I'm not the one interrupting the guest to show incredible rudeness on the air. I'm simply the one trying to answer your questions and make America a better place."–March 31, 2009[10]

References

  1. "Grayson Has No Plans to Pull His Verbal Punches", Orlando Sentinet, October 30, 2009, [1]
  2. CNN, YouTube
  3. CNN Political Ticker
  4. The Ed Show, October 1, 2009, MSNBC, [2]
  5. Grayson: GOP, FOX News "Enemy Of America", October 21, 2009, RealClearPolitics.com
  6. Hardball with Chris Matthews, MSNBC, October 22, 2009, [3]
  7. HuffingtonPost.com
  8. AllHeadlineNews.com
  9. "Alan Grayson: I'm no Joe Wilson" by Andy Barr, Politico.com, October 12, 2009
  10. "Rep. Alan Grayson Hates Me, Not Fox" by Neil Cavuto, Fox News, October 28, 2009







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