The Full Wiki

Alan Jones (Formula 1): Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Alan Jones (racing driver) article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alan Jones
Nationality Australia Australian
Formula One World Championship career
Active years 1975 - 1981, 1983, 1985 - 1986
Teams Hesketh, Hill, Surtees, Shadow, Williams, Arrows, Haas Lola
Races 117 (116 starts)
Championships 1 (1980)
Wins 12
Podiums 24
Career points 199 (206)[1]
Pole positions 6
Fastest laps 13
First race 1975 Spanish Grand Prix
First win 1977 Austrian Grand Prix
Last win 1981 Caesars Palace Grand Prix
Last race 1986 Australian Grand Prix

Alan Stanley Jones[2] MBE (born 2 November 1946 in Melbourne, Australia) is an Australian former Formula One driver. He was the first driver to win a Formula One World Championship with the Williams team, becoming the 1980 World Drivers' Champion.

Jones is also the last Australian driver to win the Australian Grand Prix, winning the 1980 event at Calder Park Raceway, having lapped the field.

Contents

Early life

Jones attended Xavier College and was the son of Stan Jones, an Australian racing driver and winner of the 1959 Australian Grand Prix, and wanted to follow in his footsteps. The younger Jones left for Europe in 1967 to make a name for himself but met little success.

Racing career

Advertisements

Pre Formula One

It took about six years before any notable results of his own, in a Formula 3 car. In 1974 he managed to land a full time Formula Atlantic ride, and his team owner parlayed it into a chance at F1 the following season, after purchasing a car from the Hesketh racing team.

Formula One

After four races in F1 the team chose not to continue racing, but Jones did, as the race after his team disbanded he was named as an injury replacement for Rolf Stommelen on Graham Hill's racing team. He had a best finish of fifth at Hockenheim while there.

He earned his first full-time F1 drive in 1976, in John Surtees' racing team. Jones' car was mostly known for its infamous Durex sponsorship, but he managed several good finishes in it, a fourth in Japan being the best of them. Surtees dropped him after that year as he did not get along well with the Aussie, and Jones was racing in America when the Shadow team named him as a replacement for Tom Pryce, who had been killed in a freak racing accident in South Africa. He made the most of the opportunity and won at the Österreichring for his maiden victory, finishing seventh in the championship.

In 1978, Jones, who was on the Williams F1 roster on alternate weekends, also signed with Haas-Hall racing, and competed in the Lola 333CS Chaparral in the Can-Am championship, taking nine poles in ten races. (Jones missed the Laguna Seca race due to an F1 scheduling conflict. Stand-in Brian Redman finished twelfth in that race after the kill wire was crimped under a valve cover, resulting in intermittent ignition.) Of the nine races in which he competed, Jones won five (Atlanta, Mosport, Road America, Mid-Ohio, and Riverside.) He finished second to Elliot Forbes-Robinson at Charlotte after hitting a chicane and losing a spark plug wire, cracked up at St Jovite; lost a radiator at the Glen. He finished third at Trois-Rivieres after losing a shift fork and being stuck with only second and fifth gears on the tight road circuit. At that race, water-injected brakes were first used in Can-Am, developed by the Haas team and copied with varying degrees of success by others. Jones ran one Can-Am in 1979 (Mid-Ohio), where he and Keke Rosberg had fun running into each other and finishing 1-2, with Jones winning his last Can-Am start.

By 1977, he had already caught the attention of Frank Williams, who was looking to rebuild his F1 racing team. Williams Grand Prix had struggled for success in its first years and Jones was entrusted to give them their first taste of it. He did not do much initially to do that, a second place finish at Watkins Glen being the best he could do, but he helped put the team on the F1 map in 1979 using the Williams FW07, after winning four races in the span of five events near the end of the season. Jones finished third in the championship hunt that year, and it was the springboard to an excellent 1980 campaign.

1980 championship winning car Williams FW07

Jones won seven races in 1980, although the Spanish Grand Prix was later removed from the championship and the Australian Grand Prix was a non-championship race, so only five counted towards the Championship. Throughout the season he had a car which consistently made the podium, and he achieved ten during the year. At the end of the season he had beaten Nelson Piquet by 13 points in the standings, becoming Australia's first World Champion since Sir Jack Brabham. He had a good chance to repeat his success in 1981, but a very combative relationship with Carlos Reutemann led to an intense rivalry that possibly cost both drivers a chance at the championship. He finished four points behind Piquet for the championship and three behind Reutemann.

He announced his retirement after the season, which he managed to cap off with a win in Las Vegas, but came out of retirement for a one-time drive with Arrows in 1983. Two more years later, Team Haas was created and Jones was the first driver for that outfit, and he would race a full season in 1986, his first in five years, but after a series of disappointing results he left F1 for good.

Post Formula One

Jones post Formula One career was initially spasmodic in nature. Briefly in demand for his services as a Touring Car co-driver, he raced occasionally in his home country's biggest endurance race, the Bathurst 1000 but success was elusive. In 1982 he attempted his first full season of racing, driving a Porsche 935 to dominate the 1982 Australian GT Championship. Soon after he made his first failed comeback to Formula One. After returning to Australia again he formed his own Touring Car team, combining the resources of V8 Ford driver Bob Morris and rotary Mazda racer Barry Jones into a single two-car team but results were mixed and the exercise dissipated by the end of the season. 1984 brought a top six finish at Le Mans 24 Hour and a top four finish at the Bathurst 1000. Quickly snapped up as the lead driver in the newly formed factory supported Alfa Romeo touring car team for the 1985 season, he abandoned his first serious Australian Touring Car Championship campaign to make his second Formula One comeback with the Beatrix Lola team.

After returning home again in 1987 his career did not pick up again until a competitive third placing at the 1988 Bathurst 1000 saw him signed up as full time number 2 driver to Tony Longhurst in his Ford Sierra team, which was brutally fast but disappointingly fragile and results were again elusive. The team switched to BMWs in 1991, which saw the return of reliability at the cost of speed. Jones took the occasional podium result. A switch to Glenn Seton Racing mid-season in 1992 brought improved results and race wins and he finished runner up to his team leader Glenn Seton as their V8 Ford Falcons dominated the 1993 Australian Touring Car Championship. The team's dominance faded over the next few years. The 1995 Bathurst 1000 looked to be a high point with a memorable 1-2 finish for their two cars fading into just a second for the car Jones shared with Allan Grice. By this point the team was sundering apart and Jones took the major sponsor to form a new team with engineering brothers Ross and Jim Stone as partners, known commercially as Pack Leader Racing. Initially fast, the partnership was fading by 1997 and the Stones bought Jones out, rebadging the team as Stone Brothers Racing. Jones returned to race with Tony Longhurst's team again in 1998 by this time his form was fading. From 1999 onwards he no longer raced full-time, driving just the endurance races as a hired gun. His final race was with Dick Johnson Racing, driving into a seventh placed finish at the 2002 Bathurst 1000.

He became a commentator with Channel Nine as part of their F1 coverage in Australia in the late 1980s, a role which lasted over a decade until a change of network. Jones has since become involved in the Australian franchise of the A1 Grand Prix as Team Director. He attempted to race in the Grand Prix Masters World Series at Kyalami in November 2005 but had to pull out before qualifying due to neck pains. There was speculation at the time that his exit was due more to a general lack of fitness which had left him up to ten seconds per lap off the pace in practice.

Personal life

Jones separated from his wife Beverley in the late 1980s. In 1996 he began a relationship with Amanda Butler Davis and in 2001 their twins, Zara and Jack, were born.

Jones also has a daughter, Camilla, who was born in 1990.

Jones's adopted son Christian now races in various forms of motorsport.

Career results

Season Series Position Car Team
1973 British Formula Three Championship 2nd GRD DART
1978 Can-Am Cup 1st Lola T333CS Chevrolet Haas-Hall Racing
1982 Australian GT Championship 1st Porsche 935 Porsche Cars Australia
1985 Australian Touring Car Championship 8th Alfa Romeo Alfetta GTV6 Network Alfa
1985 CART Indy Car World Series 23rd Lola T900 Cosworth Newman-Haas Racing
1990 Australian Touring Car Championship 9th Ford Sierra RS500 Benson & Hedges Racing
1991 Australian Touring Car Championship 4th BMW M3 Benson & Hedges Racing
1992 Australian Touring Car Championship 7th BMW M3 Benson & Hedges Racing
1993 Australian Touring Car Championship 2nd Ford EB Falcon Glenn Seton Racing
1994 Australian Touring Car Championship 4th Ford EB Falcon Glenn Seton Racing
1995 Australian Touring Car Championship 8th Ford EF Falcon Glenn Seton Racing
1996 Australian Touring Car Championship 8th Ford EF Falcon Alan Jones Racing
1997 Australian Touring Car Championship 11th Ford EL Falcon Alan Jones Racing
1998 Australian Touring Car Championship 16th Ford EL Falcon Tony Longhurst Racing
1999 V8 Supercar Championship Series 62nd Ford AU Falcon
2001 V8 Supercar Championship Series 44th Ford AU Falcon
2002 V8 Supercar Championship Series 38th Ford AU Falcon

Complete Formula One results

(key) (races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Yr Team Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 WDC Points[1]
1975 Custom Made Harry Stiller Racing Hesketh 308B Ford V8 ARG
BRA
RSA
ESP
Ret
MON
Ret
BEL
Ret
SWE
11
17th 2
Embassy Racing with Graham Hill Hill GH1 Ford V8 NED
13
FRA
16
GBR
10
GER
5
AUT
ITA
USA
1976 Durex Team Surtees Surtees TS19 Ford V8 BRA
RSA
USW
NC
ESP
9
BEL
5
MON
Ret
SWE
13
FRA
Ret
GBR
5
GER
10
AUT
Ret
NED
8
ITA
12
CAN
16
USA
8
JPN
4
15th 7
1977 Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN8 Ford V8 ARG
BRA
RSA
USW
Ret
ESP
Ret
MON
6
BEL
5
SWE
17
FRA
Ret
GBR
7
GER
Ret
AUT
1
NED
Ret
ITA
3
USA
Ret
CAN
4
JPN
4
7th 22
1978 Williams Grand Prix Engineering Williams FW06 Ford V8 ARG
Ret
BRA
11
RSA
4
USW
7
MON
Ret
BEL
10
ESP
8
SWE
Ret
FRA
5
GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
AUT
Ret
NED
Ret
ITA
13
USA
2
CAN
9
11th 11
1979 Albilad-Saudia Racing Team Williams FW06 Ford V8 ARG
9
BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
USW
3
ESP
Ret
BEL
Ret
MON
Ret
FRA
4
3rd 40 (43)
Williams FW07 Ford V8 GBR
Ret
GER
1
AUT
1
NED
1
ITA
9
CAN
1
USA
Ret
1980 Albilad-Williams Racing Team Williams FW07B Ford V8 ARG
1
BRA
3
RSA
Ret
USW
Ret
BEL
2
MON
Ret
FRA
1
GBR
1
GER
3
AUT
2
NED
11
ITA
2
CAN
1
USA
1
1st 67 (71)
1981 TAG Williams Racing Team Williams FW07C Ford V8 USW
1
BRA
2
ARG
4
SMR
12
BEL
Ret
MON
2
ESP
7
FRA
17
GBR
Ret
GER
11
AUT
4
NED
3
ITA
2
CAN
Ret
CPL
1
3rd 46
1983 Arrows Racing Team Arrows A6 Ford V8 BRA
USW
Ret
FRA
SMR
MON
BEL
DET
CAN
GBR
GER
AUT
NED
ITA
EUR
RSA
NC 0
1985 Team Haas (USA) Ltd Lola THL-1 Hart S4 (t/c) BRA
POR
SMR
MON
CAN
DET
FRA
GBR
GER
AUT
NED
ITA
Ret
BEL
EUR
Ret
RSA
DNS
AUS
Ret
NC 0
1986 Team Haas (USA) Ltd Lola THL-1 Hart S4 (t/c) BRA
Ret
ESP
Ret
12th 4
Lola THL-2 Ford V6 (t/c) SMR
Ret
MON
Ret
BEL
11
CAN
10
DET
Ret
FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
GER
9
HUN
Ret
AUT
4
ITA
6
POR
Ret
MEX
Ret
AUS
Ret

Notes

  1. ^ a b Up until 1990, not all points scored by a driver contributed to their final World Championship tally (see list of pointscoring systems for more information). Numbers without parentheses are Championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.
  2. ^ FIA Year Book of Automobile Sport 1979. Patrick Stephens Ltd.. white p. 38. ISBN 0850593204.  
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Patrick Tambay
Can-Am Champion
1978
Succeeded by
Jacky Ickx
Preceded by
Jody Scheckter
Formula One World Champion
1980
Succeeded by
Nelson Piquet
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
John Watson
Hawthorn Memorial Trophy
1979-1981
Succeeded by
John Watson

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message