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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An alarm gives an audible or visual warning about a problem or condition.

Alarms include:

Alarms have the capability of causing a fight-or-flight response in humans; a person under this mindset will panic and either flee the perceived danger or attempt to eliminate it, often ignoring rational thought in either case. We can characterise a person in such a state as "alarmed".

With any kind of alarm, the need exists to balance between on the one hand the danger of false alarms (called "false positives") — the signal going off in the absence of a problem — and on the other hand failing to signal an actual problem (called a "false negative"). False alarms can waste resources expensively and can even be dangerous. For example, false alarms of a fire can waste firefighter manpower, making them unavailable for a real fire, and risk injury to firefighters and others as the fire engines race to the alleged fire's location. In addition, false alarms may acclimatise people to ignore alarm signals, and thus possibly to ignore an actual emergency: Aesop's fable of The Boy Who Cried Wolf exemplifies this problem.

Etymology

The word comes from the Old French À l'arme meaning "To the arms", "To the weapons", telling armed men to pick up their weapons and get ready for action, because an enemy may have suddenly appeared.

See also

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An alarm gives an audible or visual warning about a problem or condition.

Alarms include:

Alarms have the capability of causing a fight-or-flight response in humans; a person under this mindset will panic and either flee the perceived danger or attempt to eliminate it, often ignoring rational thought in either case. We can characterise a person in such a state as "alarmed".

With any kind of alarm, the need exists to balance between on the one hand the danger of false alarms (called "false positives") — the signal going off in the absence of a problem — and on the other hand failing to signal an actual problem (called a "false negative"). False alarms can waste resources expensively and can even be dangerous. For example, false alarms of a fire can waste firefighter manpower, making them unavailable for a real fire, and risk injury to firefighters and others as the fire engines race to the alleged fire's location. In addition, false alarms may acclimatise people to ignore alarm signals, and thus possibly to ignore an actual emergency: Aesop's fable of The Boy Who Cried Wolf exemplifies this problem.

Etymology

The word comes from the Old French À l'arme meaning "To the arms", "To the weapons", telling armed men to pick up their weapons and get ready for action, because an enemy may have suddenly appeared.

See also


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also alarm

German

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German Wikipedia has an article on:
Alarm

Wikipedia de

Noun

Alarm m. (genitive Alarms, plural Alarme)

  1. alert, alarm

Derived terms


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

A particular quivering sound of the silver trumpets to give warning to the Hebrews on their journey through the wilderness (Num 10:5f), a call to arms, or a war-note (Jer 4:19; Jer 49:2; Zeph 1:16).

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)


Simple English

An alarm is something used to alert people quickly to something. Most alarms use loud noises and/or flashing lights. Some alarms may use other ways of attracting peoples attention quickly.

Types of alarms

  • Alarm clock
  • Burglar alarm
  • Siren on an emergency vehicle (ambulance, fire truck, police car)
  • Klaxon
  • Fire alarm

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