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Alessandro Calori
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Personal information
Date of birth August 29, 1966 (1966-08-29) (age 43)
Place of birth    Arezzo, Italy
Height 1.89 m (6 ft 2+12 in)
Playing position Manager (former centre back)
Club information
Current club Portosummaga
Youth career
1984–1985 Arezzo
Senior career1
Years Club App (Gls)*
1985–1989
1989–1991
1991–1999
1999–2000
2000–2002
2002–2004
Montevarchi
Pisa
Udinese
Perugia
Brescia
Venezia
078 0(3)
061 0(1)
255 (10)
033 0(5)
063 0(1)
058 0(1)   
Teams managed
2005
2006
2008
2009–
Triestina
Sambenedettese
Avellino
Portosummaga

1 Senior club appearances and goals
counted for the domestic league only.
* Appearances (Goals)

Alessandro Calori (born August 29, 1966 in Arezzo)[1] is an Italian football (soccer) manager and former player.

Contents

Career

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Playing

A product of Arezzo's youth system, Calori made his professional debut in 1985 with Serie C team Montevarchi, where he spent four season. After two seasons with Pisa, in 1991 Calori joined Udinese, where he spent eight seasons, all as a regular, gaining reputation of a powerful, strong centre back. In 1999 Calori, then aged 33, signed for Perugia, and gained space in the headlines as he scored the winning goal in a 1–0 win to Juventus in the final league week, a goal that unexpectedly let Juventus lose the Serie A title to Lazio.[2] He retired in 2004, after spells with Brescia and Venezia.

Coaching

Following his retirement as a player, Calori initially stayed at Venezia, joining the managing staff that worked alongside head coach Julio César Ribas in the arancioneroverdi's 2004–2005 season, initially as team manager, and then as assistant coach. In 2005 he became joint coach of Serie B side Triestina, alongside Adriano Buffoni, only to be sacked a few weeks later. In 2006 he was then appointed at the helm of Serie C1 team Sambenedettese, a spell which proved to be unsuccessful as he was sacked on October 2006.[2][3]

On March 10, 2008 he was unveiled as new Avellino coach, replacing Guido Carboni.[4] He left his post on June, after having failed to save his team from relegation.

On February 2009 he was unveiled as new head coach of Lega Pro Prima Divisione club Portosummaga, replacing Manuele Domenicali.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Alessandro Calori". FootballPlus. http://www.footballplus.com/players/5361/Alessandro-Calori.html. Retrieved 2008-03-10.  
  2. ^ a b "Calori nuovo allenatore della Samb" (in Italian). Sambenedetto Oggi. 2006-06-29. http://www.sambenedettoggi.it/2006/06/29/21494/calori-nuovo-allenatore-della-samb/. Retrieved 2008-03-10.  
  3. ^ "Via Calori, torna Chimenti" (in Italian). Sambenedetto Oggi. 2006-10-03. http://www.sambenedettoggi.it/2006/10/03/26181/via-calori-torna-chimenti/. Retrieved 2008-03-10.  
  4. ^ "UFFICIALE: Avellino, esonerato Carboni. Arriva Alessandro Calori" (in Italian). TuttoMercatoWeb. 2008-03-10. http://tuttomercatoweb.com/?action=read&id=96534. Retrieved 2008-03-10.  
  5. ^ "Il Portogruaro a Calori" (in Italian). Corriere dello Sport - Stadio. 2009-02-09. http://www.corrieredellosport.it/Notizie/Calcio/57955/Il+Portogruaro+a+Calori. Retrieved 2009-02-09.  

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