Alex Rider: Wikis

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Alex Rider
Covers of all the books in the Alex Rider series.
Stormbreaker
Point Blanc
Skeleton Key
Eagle Strike
Scorpia
Ark Angel
Snakehead
Crocodile Tears
Author Anthony Horowitz
Country United Kingdom
Genre Spy fiction, thriller
Publisher Walker Books (UK)
Puffin (US)
Philomel (US)
Published 4 September 2000
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
Nintendo DS
GameBoy Advance
DVD

Alex Rider is a series of spy novels by British author Anthony Horowitz about a teenage spy named Alex Rider. The series is aimed primarily at teenagers. Eight novels have been published to date, as well as three graphic novels, three short stories and a supplementary book. The first novel, Stormbreaker, was first released in the United Kingdom in 2000 and was adapted into a motion picture in 2006. A video game was released in 2006, based on the film. The novels are published by Walker Books in the United Kingdom. They were first published by Puffin in the United States, but have also been published more recently by Philomel, also an imprint of Penguin Books.[1] The graphic novels are published by Walker in the United Kingdom, and by Philomel in the United States.

Contents

Overview

The books follow the life of 14-year-old orphan. After the death of his uncle, a spy working for MI6, Alex enters the organization and embarks on a series of missions. The series pays homage to the James Bond franchise through its use of unusual villians, spy gadgetry and extreme scenarios. Throughout the series Alex endeavours to protect the world from evil and learn more about MI6's connection to his family history.

Novels

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Stormbreaker

Stormbreaker, published in 2000, is the series' first novel. A 14-year-old orphan, Alex Rider, learns that his uncle has died. Unbeknownst to Alex, his uncle was a spy, who had been training him for a career with MI6. Alex soon finds himself recruited by MI6 and forced to investigate Lebanese millionaire Herod Sayle, who plans to kill all of Britain's schoolchildren with his "Stormbreaker" computers.

Point Blanc

Point Blanc (renamed Point Blank in North America) was published in 2001. Alex investigates Dr Hugo Grief, a South African scientist who runs Point Blanc, an academy in the French Alps.Alex exaped from Point Blanc and found a way to get down the snowy slop.

Skeleton Key

Skeleton Key was published in 2002. After foiling a Triad plot to fix Wimbledon games, Alex is in danger of assassination. Forced to leave the country, MI6 sends him on a mission to Cuba with the CIA, where he encounters a former Soviet general, Alexei Sarov, with plans for a nuclear holocaust and world domination.

Eagle Strike

Eagle Strike was published in 2003. Damian Cray, a world-famous pop star, hopes to destroy the world's drug-making countries by hijacking the the United States' nuclear arsenal. Suspicious of him, Alex takes Cray on without the help of the skeptical MI6.

Scorpia

Scorpia was published in 2004. Following the advice of the assassin Yassen Gregorovich, Alex joins the criminal organisation "Scorpia" to find out the truth about his father.

Ark Angel

Ark Angel, published in 2005, follows Alex's second mission for the CIA to gather information on Russian billionaire Nikolei Drevin, who is financing the space hotel "Ark Angel", and the eco-terrorist organization, Force Three.

Snakehead

Snakehead was published in 2007. Taking place immediately after Ark Angel, the novel sees Alex recruited by SAS to infiltrate a Snakehead organization by posing as an Afghan refugee. Alex meets his godfather, Ash, and confronts the organisation Scorpia for the second time.

Crocodile Tears

Crocodile Tears, the eighth novel, was published in 2009. Targeted by a hitman and under threat of his past being exposed by the media, Alex reluctantly turns to MI6. But their help doesn't come cheap: they need Alex to spy on the activities at a GM crop plant being developed by Leonard Straik. There he spots Desmond McCain with Straik, he is a high profile charity organiser, who realises that Alex is on to him and the real plans for the money he's raising. Kidnapped and whisked off to Africa, Alex learns the full horror of McCain's plot: to create an epic disaster that will kill millions of people. Getting word to MI6 only makes matters worse. Now, before even facing the real enemy, Alex must also stop his own side before they unwittingly trigger the death of a whole nation.

Past

Originally, Snakehead was to follow Birdstrike as the eighth book, and would be the final Alex Rider novel. However, Horowitz rethought this idea, following negative responses during school visits. Crocodile Tears was instead released as the eighth book, in November 2009. This will be followed by Yassen and then by the tenth and last book, which could be named Endurance Point making for a series of ten books.[2][3] Anthony Horowitz has hinted that he may use the title "Endurance Point" for a future Alex Rider novel.[4]

Characters

Franchise

Novels

  1. Stormbreaker (4 September 2000)
  2. Point Blanc (3 September 2001) (entitled Point Blank in the United States)
  3. Skeleton Key (8 July 2002)
  4. Eagle Strike (7 April 2003)
  5. Scorpia (1 April 2004)
  6. Ark Angel (1 April, 2005)
  7. Snakehead (31 October 2007)
  8. Crocodile Tears (12 November 2009)
  9. Yassen (upcoming)

Graphic novels

  • Stormbreaker: The Graphic Novel (July 2006)
  • Point Blanc: The Graphic Novel (September 2007)
  • Skeleton Key: The Graphic Novel (September 2009)

Supplementary books

  • Alex Rider: The Gadgets (17 October 2005)
  • Alex Rider: The Mission Files (6 October 2008)

Short stories

  • Alex Rider: Secret Weapon (9 February 2003)
  • Alex Rider: Christmas at Gunpoint (1 January 2007)
  • Alex Rider: Incident in Nice (9 November 2009)[5]
  • Alex Underground
  • Resistance to Interrogation, an extra chapter in Stormbreaker

Films

  • Stormbreaker (21 July 2006) (retitled Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker in the United States)

Video games

  • Alex Rider: Stormbreaker (25 September 2006)

Reception

So far, the series has had 10 million sales worldwide.[6][7] The third novel, Skeleton Key, was awarded the Red House Children's Book Award.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Search/AdvSearchProc/1,,S52720,00.html
  2. ^ Horowitz, Anthony (17 December 2008). "I’M OFF FOR CHRISTMAS…AND THE NEXT ALEX". anthonyhorowitz.com. http://anthonyhorowitz.com/newscentre/alexrider/i%E2%80%99m-off-for-christmasand-the-next-alex/80/. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 
  3. ^ Horowitz, Anthony (30 June 2008). "SUMMER – MADNESS IN SCOTLAND AND TEA WITH TERRORISTS". anthonyhorowitz.com. http://anthonyhorowitz.com/newscentre/alexrider/summer-madness-in-scotland-and-tea-with-terrorists/63/. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  4. ^ Horowitz, Anthony (28 October 2008). "NECROPOLIS, NEW YORK AND A QUESTION: SHOULD I SUE DARREN SHAN?". anthonyhorowitz.com. http://anthonyhorowitz.com/newscentre/category/alexrider/page/3/. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  5. ^ Anthony Horowitz (9 November 2009). "Alex Rider exclusive: Incident in Nice". The Times. http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/fiction/article6906501.ece. Retrieved 2009-11-15. 
  6. ^ Middleton, Christopher (6 November 2009). "Alex Rider returns in Crocodile Tears but author Anthony Horowitz hints it might be the end". Telegraph.co.uk. Telegraph Media Group Limited. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookclub/6508053/Alex-Rider-returns-in-Crocodile-Tears-but-author-Anthony-Horowitz-hints-it-might-be-the-end.html. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 
  7. ^ Corbett, Sue (5 November 2009). "Invent a Tool for Alex Rider". Publishers Weekly. Reed Business Information. http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6705501.html?industryid=47152. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  8. ^ "Past winners from 2000–2008". Red House Children's Book Award. http://www.redhousechildrensbookaward.co.uk/past-winners-2000-2008.html. 

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Alexander "Alex" Rider is a fictional character from the novel series Alex Rider written by British author Anthony Horowitz.

Sourced

  • I'm sorry you were bullied at school, but lots of kids get bullied and they don't turn into psychopaths.
  • It looks like I sleighed him...
    • Point Blanc, Anthony Horowitz, 2001-09-03.
    • Spoken when Rider runs his sled into Dr. Grief's helicopter. It is a play on words, with "sleighed" also meaning "slayed" in the same context.
  • Damian Cray to Rider: Do you know the most evil thing in the world?
    Rider to Cray: Is that including or not including you?

Unsourced

  • Major Yu to Rider: My life has been a remarkable one. Maybe one day someone will write a book about me...
    Rider to Major Yu: I've never much cared for horror stories.
    • Spoken in a conversation between characters Major Yu and Alex Rider
  • Major Yu to Rider: Goodbye, Alex. I enjoyed meeting you.
    Rider to Major Yu: Go to Hell, Major Yu
    • Spoken in a conversation between characters Major Yu and Alex Rider

External links

Wikipedia
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