Alfredo Griffin: Wikis

  

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Alfredo Griffin
Shortstop
Born: October 6, 1957 (1957-10-06) (age 52)
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Batted: Switch Threw: Right 
MLB debut
September 4, 1976 for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1993 for the Toronto Blue Jays
Career statistics
Batting average     .249
Hits     1,688
Stolen bases     192
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Alfredo Claudino Griffin (born October 6, 1957) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) player, who played shortstop for four teams from 1976 to 1993. He is currently the first base coach for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Contents

Playing career

Alfredo began his career as a member of the Cleveland Indians, who signed him as an amateur free agent in 1973. On December 5, 1978, before having played a full season in the majors, he was traded, along with Phil Lansford (minors), to the Toronto Blue Jays for Victor Cruz. Alfredo made an immediate impact, sharing the American League Rookie of the Year Award in 1979 with John Castino.

In 1984, he was named to the All-Star team. This was explained by John Feinstein of the Washington Post as: "Making the All-Star team the hard way: Major league baseball pays the expenses for each player here and for one guest. In most cases, players bring wives or girlfriends. Damaso Garcia, the Toronto Blue Jays' second baseman, brought his shortstop, Alfredo Griffin. When the Tigers' Alan Trammell hurt his arm and could not play tonight, Manager Joe Altobelli named Griffin to the team, partly because he's a fine player, but mostly because he was here."[1]

All the same, Griffin was valued far more for his glove than his bat. Mike Scioscia called him "the Ozzie Smith of the American League." A steady, everyday shortstop, he spent six years with the Blue Jays, playing in 392 consecutive games. He was traded after the 1984 season to Oakland, where, despite his reluctance to draw walks and a tendency to be overaggressive on the basepaths, he began to harness the offensive promise he showed in 1980 when he set an AL record for most triples by a switch-hitter with a league-leading 15.

After establishing personal bests in most offensive categories with the Athletics, Griffin was traded to the Dodgers for Bob Welch prior to the 1988 season in a move that helped both teams to league championships. A Dwight Gooden fastball broke his hand in May 1988, and he was disabled for much of 1988 and part of 1989.

Griffin returned to Toronto in 1992 and was a key contributor as the Jays took the first of two consecutive championships. On October 13, 1993, he stood on deck as Joe Carter faced Mitch Williams in the ninth inning of Game Six. His career came to an end moments later when Carter homered to win the World Series for Toronto.

Coaching career

He is currently the first-base coach for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in MLB, and also for the Estrellas Orientales (Eastern Stars) in his native Dominican Republic's Winter League.

Trivia

  • During the game in which his consecutive game streak ended, Griffin scored the winning run. This oddity happened because an official appearance in a major league game requires the player to either play an inning of defense or have a plate appearance (per Rule 10.24(c) of baseball's Official Rules). As a pinch runner, Griffin had neither.
  • Was pinch-hit for to set up Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series Game 1 winning home run, five years later he was on the on deck circle when Joe Carter hit game-winning home run in 1993 World Series.
  • Has one of the more famous nicknames used by ESPN Announcer Chris Berman: "Fettucini Alfredo Griffin."
  • Has been on the losing team in three perfect games, the Toronto Blue Jays in 1981, the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1988, and the Dodgers again in 1991.

Alfredo Griffin Career Stats

Alfredo Griffin (Updated: November 14, 2007 [2])
Season Ag Team Lg G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG *OPS+ TB SH SF IBB HBP GDP
1976 18 CLE AL 12 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 .250 .250 .250 49 1 0 0 0 0 0
1977 19 CLE AL 14 41 5 6 1 0 0 3 2 2 3 5 .146 .205 .171 6 7 0 0 0 0 1
1978 20 CLE AL 5 4 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 .500 .667 .750 301 3 0 0 0 0 0
1979 21 TOR AL 153 624 81 179 22 10 2 31 21 16 40 59 .287 .333 .364 89 227 16 4 0 5 10
1980 22 TOR AL 155 653 63 166 26 15 2 41 18 23 24 58 .254 .283 .349 69 228 10 5 2 4 8
1981 23 TOR AL 101 388 30 81 19 6 0 21 8 12 17 38 .209 .243 .289 49 112 6 2 1 1 6
1982 24 TOR AL 162 539 57 130 20 8 1 48 10 8 22 48 .241 .269 .314 54 169 11 4 0 0 7
1983 25 TOR AL 162 528 62 132 22 9 4 47 8 11 27 44 .250 .289 .348 71 184 11 3 0 3 5
1984 26 TOR AL 140 419 53 101 8 2 4 30 11 3 4 33 .241 .248 .298 48 125 13 4 0 1 5
1985 27 OAK AL 162 614 75 166 18 7 2 64 24 9 20 50 .270 .290 .332 77 204 5 7 1 0 6
1986 28 OAK AL 162 594 74 169 23 6 4 51 33 16 35 52 .285 .323 .364 94 216 12 6 6 2 5
1987 29 OAK AL 144 494 69 130 23 5 3 60 26 13 28 41 .263 .306 .348 79 172 10 3 2 4 9
1988 30 LAD NL 95 316 39 63 8 3 1 27 7 5 24 30 .199 .259 .253 50 80 11 1 7 2 3
1989 31 LAD NL 136 506 49 125 27 2 0 29 10 7 29 57 .247 .287 .308 72 156 11 1 2 0 5
1990 32 LAD NL 141 461 38 97 11 3 1 35 6 3 29 65 .210 .258 .254 43 117 6 4 11 2 5
1991 33 LAD NL 109 350 27 85 6 2 0 27 5 4 22 49 .243 .286 .271 60 95 7 5 5 1 5
1992 34 TOR AL 63 150 21 35 7 0 0 10 3 1 9 19 .233 .273 .280 53 42 3 2 0 0 3
1993 35 TOR AL 46 95 15 20 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 13 .211 .235 .242 28 23 4 0 0 0 3
TOTALS 1962 6780 759 1688 245 78 24 527 192 134 338 664 .249 .285 .319 67 2161 136 51 37 25 86

See also

References

External links

Preceded by
Lou Whitaker
American League Rookie of the Year
1979
Succeeded by
Joe Charboneau







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