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Ali Parvin
Ali Parvin on the right
Personal information
Full name Ali Parvin
Date of birth 25 September 1947 (1947-09-25) (age 62)
Place of birth Tehran, Iran
Height 1.69 m (5 ft 6+12 in)[1]
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1962–? Aref
Alborz
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
?–1968 Kian
1968–1970 Paykan
1970–1988 Persepolis 2780 (95)
National team
1970–1980 Iran 0760 (13)
Teams managed
1982–1988 Persepolis
1988–1993 Persepolis
1989–1993 Iran
1998–2003 Persepolis
2005–2006 Persepolis
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 18 July 2009.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 18 July 2009

Ali Parvin (Persian: علی پروین, Nicknamed Soltan that means the King Of Kings( Great Shah), born September 25, 1947 in Tehran) is an Iranian football coach and former player. He is one of the most famous footballers ever to play in Iran, and regarded as one of the best from Iran.

Contents

Playing career

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Club career

He was discovered while playing street football with for neighbourhood club Aref in the alleys near his home. After being scouted he joined Alborz FC, the reserve team of Kayan FC, where he would be called up very quickly. Eventually he made his way to Paykan FC and was one of the star players in the team in its short run in Iranian football. He moved to Persepolis FC as many other Paykan players did after the club was dissolved in 1970. After the Iranian Revolution and during the Iran–Iraq War Parvin was instrumental in helping the Persepolis club survive, often providing the team with financial help and not allowing the team to be destroyed. By the end of his playing career he was a in a player/manager position. He retired from competitive football in 1988.

International career

Because of his great form for Persepolis he was soon invited to the national team and had many impressive displays as a midfielder. His first official cap was on September 1, 1970 versus Pakistan. He was part of the Iranian Asian Cup winning sqauds of 1972 and 1976 and participated in the 72 Munich and 76 Montreal Olympic Games football tournament. He retired from international football after Iran's exit in the 1978 World Cup in Argentina. He finished his international career with 81 caps and 12 goals.

Managerial career

In late 1989 Parvin (or Sultan as many call him) became the Iranian national team manager. He had already gained experience managing Tehran powerhouse, Persepolis FC. At first his popularity grew even more as the team won the 1990 Asian Games football gold medal, but early elimination from the 1992 Asian Cup and failure to qualify for World Cup 1994 cost him his job. He was fired in 1993 and replaced by Stanko Poklepovic.

A number of years after he became the manager of Persepolis FC and helped the team to a number of league titles. He left the team briefly in the 2003-04 season but returned the year after as the technical director of the team. After a poor start for Persepolis in the 2005-06 season he again became the manager, only to leave at the end of the season due to the club's poor form.

In recent years Parvin has been criticized for the style of play his teams show on the field, which is considered by many to be thoughtless, ugly football with no real plan. Many also believe he completely ran Persepolis FC, and refused to let anyone else interfere, believing the team to be truly his own.

On April 30, 2007, Ali Parvin bought the rights to Azadegan League club Ekbatan F.C. who he renamed to Steel Azin F.C..[2].

Honours

  • Winning the Tehran Championships with Paykan Tehran F.C. (1969)
  • Winning the Friendship Cup with Paykan Tehran F.C. (1969)
  • Winning the Iran League Championships with Persepolis F.C. (1971)
  • Winning the Regional Improvement Cup with Iran National Team (1970)
  • Winning the Kurosh Cup with Iran National Team (1971)
  • Qualifying for the 1972 Olympic Games with Iran National Team (1972)
  • Winning the Asian Nations Cup with Iran National Team (1972)
  • Winning the Takht-e Jamshid League with Persepolis (1973)
  • Winning the Asian Games with Iran National Team (1974)
  • Winning the Takht-e Jamshid League with Persepolis (1975)
  • Qualifying for the 1976 Olympic Games with Iran National Team (1975)
  • Winning the Asian Nations Cup with Iran National Team (1976)
  • Qualifying for and playing in the 1978 World Cup with Iran National Team (1978)
  • Winning the Unification Cup with Persepolis (1981)
  • Winning the Tehran Championships with Persepolis (1982)
  • Winning the Tehran Knock-out Cup with Persepolis (1982)
  • Winning the Tehran Championships with Persepolis (1986)
  • Winning the Tehran Championships with Persepolis (1987)
  • Winning the Tehran Knock-out Cup with Persepolis (1987)
  • Winning the Iran Knock-out Cup with Persepolis (1987)
  • Winning the Tehran Championships with Persepolis (1988)
  • Winning the 17th of Shahrivar League with Persepolis (1989)
  • Winning the Asian Games with Iran National Team (1990)
  • Winning the Asian Winner of the Cup Winners (1991)
  • Winning the Iran Knock-out Cup with Persepolis (1992)
  • Winning the Azadegan League with Persepolis (1998-1999)
  • Winning the Iran Pro League (2001)

Personal life

Parvin is the fifth oldest child in an eight child family consisting of four sons and four daughters. His father, Ahmad Parvin worked in the Tehran bazar.

Parvin married in 1976. He has two daughters and one son. His son, Mohammad Parvin plays for Perspolis. He along with his wife, and the family of his children lives in house that he built in the Lavasan area, near Tehran.[3].

Notes

References

External links

Preceded by
Mehdi Monajati
Iran national football team
manager

1989-1993
Succeeded by
Stanko Poklepović

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